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Read the experience of Rishi who recently traveled to forest of Dooars (Bengal, India). Click Here

  Is Jaguar capable of killing big crocodiles ?
Posted by: sanjay - 08-22-2018, 10:24 PM - Forum: Questions - Replies (6)
Ok, This question keep coming in my mind from time to time. And I really don't know if the Big Male and experienced Jaguar is capable of killing the big Crocodile or Alligator like Salt water corcos , Nile Crocodiles and American Alligators. We have seen great footage and photos of Caiman hunt by Jaguars.. even big size Caiman are not safe.. The plus point of Jaguar is, They are most capable hunter inside water compared to any other big cats.

The big male Jaguar
Big jaguar
*This image is copyright of its original author


The Big Saltwater Crocodile
Big Saltwater crocdile
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The Big Nile Crocodile
Big Nile Crocodile
*This image is copyright of its original author


Big Alligator
Big Alligator
*This image is copyright of its original author



Would like to know your views.. Please be gentle during conversation .. this is not your favorite animal contest... so don't go mad.. remain unbiased with logical arguments.
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  Orinoco Crocodile (Crocodylus intermedius)
Posted by: epaiva - 08-22-2018, 06:44 AM - Forum: Aquatic Animals and Amphibians - Replies (20)
The Orinoco crocodile (Crocodylus intyermedius) is a critically endangered crocodile. Its population is very small and it can be found only in freshwater enviroments in Venezuela and Colombia with about 2000 individuals in Venezuela and 200 in Colombia, in particular the Orinoco River and its tributaries. Extensively hunted for their skins in the 19th and 20th centuries, this species is one of the most critically endangered species of crocodiles. It is one of the larger species of crocodilian. Males have been reported up to 6,6 m. (22 ft) in the past, but such sizes do not exist today, largest males today measure 5 m (16 ft). Males average 4,1 m (13 ft) in length weighing 380 kg (840 lb), while females are substantially smaller averaging 225 kg (496 lb) measuring 3,30 m long. The coloration is light even in adults.
The Orinoco crocodile is an apex predator and will take opportunity to prey on a variety of reptiles, birds, and mammals, including Caiman crocodilus on occasion. The prey base is mostly made up of large predatory fish, challenging the general view by locals complaining about crocodile hunting local fish to a very low numbers, despite its large size the Orinoco crocodile rarely poses a threat to humans. Reproduction takes place in the dry season when the water level is lower.
Orinoco crocodiles are hole nesters, diggins holes in the sand to lay their eggs. The females guard the nests and young upto several years.
Photos taken in Puerto Miranda, Estado Guarico and Hato El Frio, Apure, Venezuela.

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author
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  Homotherium ischyrus
Posted by: epaiva - 08-19-2018, 01:31 AM - Forum: Pleistocene Big Cats - No Replies
Homotherium ischyrus on the basis of a nearly complete skeleton from Birch Creek, Idaho. in general morphology the animal is similar to the Old World species Homotherium latidens, but some characters such as the retention of a two toothed third upper premolar in the mandible and an elongated lumbar section in the vertebral column suggest an early separation from the Europe lineage.
Taken from de book The other Saber-Tooths Scimitar-Tooth Cats of the Western Hemisphere (Virginia L. Naples - Larry D. Martin - John P. Babiarz)

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author
H
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  Big Cats Sounds
Posted by: AlexE - 08-12-2018, 02:47 PM - Forum: Wildlife Pictures and Videos Gallery - No Replies



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  Reverse Image Search
Posted by: Rishi - 08-09-2018, 04:26 PM - Forum: Tips, Guides, Tutorial & Technical Problem - Replies (2)
Most of the photos shared by the posters on Wildfact are copyright of someone else. 

Often people surf through Internet once in a while & hoard all good stuff they find. Later on while posting those one might have no idea where he/she had found them, or who the photographer was.
Even if someone bookmarks every one of them & individual photo sources are still hectic to find from the pile.

To encourage the habit sharing of links & credits to photographs' source website/profile/article, here's a reliable and easy to use "Reverse Image Search" engine:
Prepostseo Image Search


What it is & how it works.

Upload the image normally like you'd do otherwise. For example:

*This image is copyright of its original author

Simply copy the images url (in edit mode, or by opening it in new tab).

Open the Image Search & paste the link, or directly use the upload image feature. Press "Search Inage".

*This image is copyright of its original author

It will show available search options with multiple major search engines.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Unless the original image is in some private profile or gallery, there is a good chance that you'll find other copies of the image on the internet.

*This image is copyright of its original author

In this case, a WWF article:

*This image is copyright of its original author

Give it a try. By sharing the source not only are you giving owners their due credit, you are also making additional details available to the viewers of your post & may hit other interesting material related to it.

It is also a great way to double check the authenticity of images & find quality versions of them.
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  Golden Jackal (Canis aureus)
Posted by: Pckts - 07-28-2018, 03:16 AM - Forum: Canids (Canidae) & Hyaenids (Hyaenidae) - Replies (3)
Hedayeat Ullah‎ 

(10 May 2018). Loc: Nakhanda Barpeta.

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  Dinofelis barlowi
Posted by: epaiva - 07-23-2018, 12:02 AM - Forum: Prehistoric animals - Replies (2)
This species displays the classic features of the genus, with skull similar in size to that of the jaguar, moderately flattened canines, large carnassial and a rather primitive mastoid region. The first fossils of this species known to science were a damaged skull and an upper canine found at the South African site of Sterkfontein, as described by R. Broom in 1937.
Reconstructed life appearance of Dinofelis barlowi, shoulder height 70 cm.        
Skull and reconstructed life appearance of head of Dinofelis barlowi
Book Sabertooth (Mauricio Anton)            

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author
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  Shark predation
Posted by: Genghis - 07-22-2018, 11:45 PM - Forum: Aquatic Animals and Amphibians - Replies (4)
I'm very surprised that this forum doesn't have a thread dedicated to 'Shark predations'... considering the fact that Sharks, especially the Great White, is one of the greatest and easily the most fearsome and devastating predator on earth! So, i'll start one...

"Sharks are apex predators throughout the ocean, yet relatively few studies have quantified or determined factors influencing their hunting behaviour and predatory success rates. The waters surrounding Seal Island in False Bay, South Africa, provide a unique opportunity to study predator-prey interactions involving Great White Sharks (hereafter white sharks). During the winter, white sharks visit Seal Island to hunt Cape fur seals. About 48% of surface attacks on seals result in successful kills. Attack frequency is high, averaging 6.68 per day, with as many as 43 recorded in a single day. Sharks attack seals on the surface via a sudden vertical rush, which propels predator and prey out of the water in an awesome display of power and acrobatic prowess"...

http://sharkresearch.rsmas.miami.edu/res...predation/

Giant 20+ft Great White Shark named 'Deep Blue' hunts for Elephant seals off Guadalupe Island:





Great White Shark attacks and tears apart an Elephant seal:





Great white breaches out of the water:





Shark attack on Dolphin:


*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author


You can't get scarier then this!!..


*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author
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  Use infographics to show data
Posted by: sanjay - 06-29-2018, 03:53 PM - Forum: Tips, Guides, Tutorial & Technical Problem - Replies (1)
I have seen many of posters including our great mod team, sometime posts various type of data related to animals. These data includes but not limited to Weight, body measurement, fossils measurement, evolution of species, statistics, counting, availability, progress and many other things.

For broader reach, effectiveness and easy to understand use Infographics to represent these data. Read about What is infographics - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Infographic
You can use photoshop, Adobe Illustrator or free online tool like canva.com to create these images.

Posting the data in plain text is not best practice and does not reach broader audience.
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  Rainy Day at Alipore Zoo, Kolkata
Posted by: Rishi - 06-27-2018, 04:02 PM - Forum: Vacations and Holidays - Replies (5)
The test is over. Googled the answers. My score is falling short of projected cut-off, not by much, but enough to bury the chances of me getting lucky.
Done my analysis. Identified my shortcomings. Drawn up plans for next attempt & aiming to meet UPSC-2019 better prepared. Another year of grinding...

But before that something i've been looking forward to, India's oldest zoo. The Alipore Zoological Garden is being renovated & new enclosures built.  
Some of the enclosures are more then 100 years old. I hadn't been there in years & i just had to see the place one last time before the older structures are demolished. 

The highest recoded attendance till date was on January 1, 2018 with 110,000 visitors. Thus i had to make sure i avoid the mob, or the animals don't come out of their shelters (standard practice here is for about 1/4 of the enclosure to be private space). So, i went on a weekday with the monsoon pouring down cats & dogs. The enclosures sure looked beautiful & lush but it meant some prized new arrivals like the Mouse deers were barely visible.
*This image is copyright of its original author

Chowsingha, the Indian four horned antelope.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Barking Deer.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Swamp Deer.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Nilgai or blue-bull female. The male was somewhere behind the bushes.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Cheetal or spotted deer, much larger up close than they look in photos. This facility is also used as a breeding centre for them. If i remember correctly, these animals have cousins that have been released in Sundarbans.

*This image is copyright of its original author

In the reptile house; Russell's Viper.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Burmese Python. (The sign says "No photography" so i decided to stop)

*This image is copyright of its original author

My favourite & Bengals state animal, Fishing cats. 

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author

Jungle cat.

*This image is copyright of its original author

The new leopard enclosure. He's on that tree. Eyes could see him but camera couldn't.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Old Aviary. Hexagonal structure with 6 triangular cages. Peacock & Saras crane in the back.  

*This image is copyright of its original author

The one in last image.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Peafowl's housing.

*This image is copyright of its original author

New aviary.

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author

At this point the rain got harder. I stood under the shed infront of the leopard enclosure. He came out & started pacing in the downpour.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Rhino (female). She has a calf who was behind the privacy wall. Her horn had been shaven for safety.

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author

Tigress Rani didn't come out of her cavern.

*This image is copyright of its original author

New enclosure for tigers, presently houses a mating pair of a regular coloured female & this male (that's him in post #1,600 in Tiger Extinction thread back in his old cage). 

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author

Most of the old cages are gone. Only 3-4 remain, with two animals still living there. This female...

*This image is copyright of its original author

...& this ex-maneater from Sundarban (In third video of post #1,600). Unlike previous times i was taking a note of their physique this once. 
He is exactly the similar to the mainland tigress in both size & stature, bigger head though. Shouldn't weigh very different.

*This image is copyright of its original author

It wasn't a day to be sitting in the water. It was damp & raining with quite a nip in the air. Helps him relive memories, i guess...

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