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Sad Vaquita only 97 left in wild!
Posted by: animalfan6 - 06-20-2019, 06:52 PM - Forum: Aquatic Animals and Amphibians - No Replies

.jpeg   images (1).jpeg (Size: 2.99 KB / Downloads: 12)     The vaquita is the smallest  dolphin in  the world, near extinction. Scientists say that captivity is the only thing that will save This species. This is so sad. Disappointed
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  Fainting goat behavior!
Posted by: animalfan6 - 06-20-2019, 06:39 PM - Forum: Herbivores Animals - No Replies
Here show a fainting goat "faints". It is actually not fainting, when this goat gets scared, it's muscles contract and make it immobile. Then in about thirty seconds, it's muscles relax and  it can move again!


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  Other birds
Posted by: Hans Kasza - 06-20-2019, 12:10 PM - Forum: Reptiles and Birds - Replies (1)
Two videos I took durring my trip in Mazury Region in Poland. Mazury is called 'green lungs' of Poland due to huge forest coverage and hundredes of lakes, rivers and brooks.








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  Interspecies hybrids: natural & artificial
Posted by: animalfan6 - 06-20-2019, 03:51 AM - Forum: Miscellaneous - Replies (6)
This is a zonkey, a weird breed produced by humans, in captivity. I am wondering how they breed two different species and it does not have defects? By the way I am a new member! Lol


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  Pleistocene wolf discovered in Yakutia
Posted by: Pckts - 06-10-2019, 11:47 PM - Forum: Canids (Canidae) & Hyaenids (Hyaenidae) - Replies (3)
Still snarling after 40,000 years, a giant Pleistocene wolf discovered in Yakutia
By The Siberian Times reporter
07 June 2019
Sensational find of head of the beast with its brain intact, preserved since prehistoric times in permafrost.

*This image is copyright of its original author

The Pleistocene wolf’s head is 40cm long, so half of the whole body length of a modern wolf which varies from 66 to 86cm. Picture: Albert Protopopov
The severed head of the world’s first full-sized Pleistocene wolf was unearthed in the Abyisky district in the north of Yakutia. 
Local man Pavel Efimov found it in summer 2018 on shore of the Tirekhtyakh River, tributary of Indigirka.
The wolf, whose rich mammoth-like fur and impressive fangs are still intact, was fully grown and aged from two to four years old when it died. 

*This image is copyright of its original author

The wolf, whose rich mammoth-like fur and impressive fangs are still intact, was fully grown and aged from two to four years old when it died. Picture: Albert Protopopov
The head was dated older than 40,000 years by Japanese scientists.
Scientists at the Swedish Museum of Natural History will examine the Pleistocene predator’s DNA.
‘This is a unique discovery of the first ever remains of a fully grown Pleistocene wolf with its tissue preserved. We will be comparing it to modern-day wolves to understand how the species has evolved and to reconstruct its appearance,’ said an excited Albert Protopopov, from the Republic of Sakha Academy of Sciences. 

*This image is copyright of its original author

Local man Pavel Efimov found it in summer 2018 on shore of the Tirekhtyakh River, tributary of Indigirka.
The Pleistocene wolf’s head is 40cm long, so half of the whole body length of a modern wolf which varies from 66 to 86cm. 
The astonishing discovery was announced in Tokyo, Japan, during the opening of a grandiose Woolly Mammoth exhibition organised by Yakutian and Japanese scientists. 

*This image is copyright of its original author





*This image is copyright of its original author




*This image is copyright of its original author

CT scan of the wolf's head. Pictures: Albert Protopopov, Naoki Suzuki
Alongside the wolf the scientists presented an immaculately-well preserved cave lion cub. 
‘Their muscles, organs and brains are in good condition,’ said Naoki Suzuki, a professor of palaeontology and medicine with the Jikei University School of Medicine in Tokyo, who studied the remains with a CT scanner. 
‘We want to assess their physical capabilities and ecology by comparing them with the lions and wolves of today.’

*This image is copyright of its original author




*This image is copyright of its original author

‘This is a unique discovery of the first ever remains of a fully grown Pleistocene wolf with its tissue preserved.' Pictures: Naoki Suzuki
The cave lion cub named Spartak - previously announced - is about 40cm long and weighed about 800 grams. 
Scientists believe the cub died shortly after birth. 
The recent discovery follows that of the remains of three cave lions in 2015 and 2017 by the same team.
The cave lion cub named Spartak - previously announced - is about 40cm long and weighed about 800 grams. Pictures: The Siberian Times, YSIA

*This image is copyright of its original author




*This image is copyright of its original author




*This image is copyright of its original author




*This image is copyright of its original author

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  Which bigcat has widest skull relative to skull length?
Posted by: Panther - 06-08-2019, 10:59 PM - Forum: Questions - Replies (11)
Recently I viewed a few discussions from Carnivora, in which I found claims like "tigers having wider skulls relative to skull lengths". Which is also my opinion. 

But the data regarding this is very low on internet. I haven't found much of info on old AVA threads, and sadly some images are missing. 

I need the info regarding skull widths relative to skull lengths of both lions(African) and tigers (Bengal), Especially from @GuateGojira, @GrizzlyClaws and @tigerluver. Although, anyone is free to answer..
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  The Great Migration
Posted by: Pckts - 06-06-2019, 11:50 PM - Forum: Herbivores Animals - Replies (15)
Each year, almost two million wildebeest and 20 000 plains game migrate from Tanzania's Serengeti to the south of Kenya's Masai Mara in search of lush grazing grounds and life-giving water. This treacherous odessey is dictated by the seasons and where the rains are, the wildebeest are not far behind. This epic journey from north to south spans almost 3000 kilometres and is virtually endless.
This great spectacle of nature is an iconic safari option for avid travellers, nature lovers and those who want a little more from their African experience. 
Rather than having a start or end point, the Great Migration moves rhythmically in a clockwise direction, making herd tracking unpredicatable. It is for this reason that our Herdtracker app was created; to help you track the wildebeests' movements and plan the safari of a lifetime. Choose from our existing safari packages or tailor-make your own journey according to your budget. 
Below, you'll find some useful resources that detail when to go, where to stay and what to expect along this unforgettable journey. 


maraengailodge

Between the month of November and December, over a million wildebeests usually arrive at the plains of the Serengeti. To our surprise, we saw this at Mara Engai. The great migration is happening very early this year and we are looking for answers as to why. Check out our story for a sneak peek ?: Jason Hafso 


naiborcamp

They’re here! Exciting news from the Mara and many thanks to our guest @baruahprerna for capturing this footage from the Sand river yesterday morning. There are currently hundreds of wildebeests above camp and we can’t wait for more migration excitement. 
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  Cheetah Predation
Posted by: Pckts - 06-04-2019, 03:57 AM - Forum: Wild Cats - Replies (1)



Cheetah's killing Kudu Bull




Cheetah Killing Kudu Bull @4:50
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  Post of the Month - June 2019
Posted by: sanjay - 06-01-2019, 12:10 PM - Forum: Top posts of the month - Replies (15)
We have Listed the Best Post of the month June 2019. If we miss any please do report us.

If you want to help us in nominating the post of the month, please read this guide for more information Read Here

@Pckts's post in thread Felids Interactions - Intraspecific Conflicts

2 video from Instagram - Tigers fighting

Watch the video: Click Here


Mods, Please add the post of the month June 2019 directly in this thread
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  Post of the Month - May 2019
Posted by: sanjay - 06-01-2019, 11:46 AM - Forum: Top posts of the month - Replies (11)
We have Listed the Best Post of May 2019 fromour members. Please report if we missed any.

If you want to help us to nominate a post as the best post of the month, please read this post for more information Read Here

@smedz Post in Reintroduction & Rewilding

Cougar Reintroduction in Ohio

See the post: CLICK HERE
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