There is a world somewhere between reality and fiction. Although ignored by many, it is very real and so are those living in it. This forum is about the natural world. Here, wild animals will be heard and respected. The forum offers a glimpse into an unknown world as well as a room with a view on the present and the future. Anyone able to speak on behalf of those living in the emerald forest and the deep blue sea is invited to join.
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  Anyone subscribed to curiositystream ?
Posted by: sanjay - 4 hours ago - Forum: Miscellaneous - No Replies
I am getting lot of advertisement for curiositystream.com. It's a subscription base documentaries and probably concept is same as Netflix and Amazon Prime. I think it is run by owner of discovery network.
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Sad Big Cat Durability
Posted by: ImperialLion - 08-13-2018, 04:28 AM - Forum: Wild Cats - No Replies
Does anyone have any cases of big cats taking life threatening injuries and living to roar about it?

Here's a young male lion who survived a kick from a giraffe



*This image is copyright of its original author


Tiger after a horrific fight I'm guessing.


*This image is copyright of its original author


Leopard gets skewered on gate. Sad
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.


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*This image is copyright of its original author
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  Big Cats Sounds
Posted by: AlexE - 08-12-2018, 02:47 PM - Forum: Terrestrial Wild Animals - No Replies



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  The foal that came in from the cold after 40,000 years
Posted by: Rage2277 - 08-12-2018, 07:09 AM - Forum: Herbivores Animals - No Replies
By The Siberian Times reporter
11 August 2018
Sensational find of world’s only completely preserved ancient baby horse, aged just three months when it died in the Palaeolithic period.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Clipety-clop! The Upper Paleolithic foal held by Semyon Grigoryev, head of the Mammoth Museum 
This is the first picture of an ancient foal dug out of the permafrost in the Batagai depression - also known as the ‘Mouth of Hell’ -  in the Yakutia region of Siberia. 
Head of the world famous Mammoth Museum in Yakutsk, Semyon Grigoryev,  said: ‘The foal was approximately three months old (when it died). 
‘The unique find was made in the permafrost of Batagai depression. The foal was completely preserved by permafrost.   
‘The extra value of the unique find is that we obtained samples of soil layers where it was preserved, which means we will be able to restore a picture of the foal’s environment.’

*This image is copyright of its original author




*This image is copyright of its original author




*This image is copyright of its original author




*This image is copyright of its original author

The Batagai depression in Verkhoyansky district of Yakutia. Pictures: The Siberian Times




The Ice Age foal lived up to 40,000 years ago, it is understood.
It was buried at a level of around 30 metres in the tadpole-shaped depression, which is a ‘megaslump’ one kilometre long and around 800 metres wide. 
‘We will report the exact time when it lived after studying the soil samples,’ said the scientist.
‘The foal has completely preserved dark-brown hair, its tail and mane, as well as all internal organs. 
‘There are no visible wounds on its body. 
‘This is the first find in the world find of a pre-historic horse of such a young age and with such an amazing level of preservation.’

*This image is copyright of its original author




*This image is copyright of its original author




*This image is copyright of its original author




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*This image is copyright of its original author

Semyon Grigoryev, head of the Mammoth Museum in Yakutsk, and the Batagai depression in Verkhoyansk depression in Verkhoyansk district of Yakutia. Pictures: The Siberian Times




One unconfirmed account suggests that hair on the ancient horse has ‘zebra-like stripes’ on its legs. 
The foal was found by an expedition to the Verkhoyansky district of Yakutia.
The find was located by scientists from the North-Eastern Federal University, and Kindai University in Japan along with a crew from Fuji TV.
Nine years ago locals in Batagai village found a bison calf and part of an ancient horse’s body.
Locals in the remote Yakutia region see this spectacular crater as superstitious, and know it as the 'gateway to the underworld'. In fact, the depression was caused by the Soviets, who cleared forest here, but it is now being enlarged and shaped by climate change, according to local scientists.
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  Lion subspecies, old and new classifications
Posted by: BorneanTiger - 08-10-2018, 07:41 PM - Forum: Premier League - No Replies
Before 2017, the following were recognised as subspecies (Heptner and Sludskiy: https://archive.org/stream/mammalsofsov2...4/mode/2up, Wozencraft: http://www.departments.bucknell.edu/biol...d=14000228, and Haas et al.: https://web.archive.org/web/201707281311...ra_leo.pdf): 

1) 1758: Nominate subspecies, the Barbary lion (Panthera leo leo) in North Africa 

Photo by Nelson Robinson, the New York Zoological Society, 1897 (https://archive.org/stream/annualreporto...#page/n141

*This image is copyright of its original author


2) 1826: the Persian lion (Panthera leo persica) in Asia, and the Senegal lion (Panthera leo senegalensis) in West Africa 

Photo of an Asiatic lion in Natureinfocus.com (https://hive.natureinfocus.in/photo_sharing/royal-walk/

*This image is copyright of its original author


Photo of a Senegal lion by Panthera (http://am1070theanswer.com/news/entertai...icas-lions

*This image is copyright of its original author


3) 1842: The Cape lion (Panthera leo melanochaita) in the Cape of Good Hope, South Africa 

Photo by an unknown photographer in Jardin des Plantes, Paris, circa 1860 (https://books.google.dk/books?id=15AsyQ8...&q&f=false

*This image is copyright of its original author


4) 1843: The Nubian lion (Panthera leo nubica) in Northeast Africa (treated as belonging to the Barbary subspecies by Wozencraft, and the Masai subspecies by Haas et al.), and the Gambian lion (Panthera leo gambianus) in West Africa (treated as belonging to the Senegalese subspecies by Wozencraft and Haas et al.

Photo of a young Nubian lion in the New York Zoological Gardens by Elwin Sanborn (https://archive.org/stream/annualreportn...9/mode/1up

*This image is copyright of its original author


Photo of a Gambian lion in BookAllSafaris (https://www.bookallsafaris.com/sam-s-tou...ark-gambia

*This image is copyright of its original author


5) 18911964: The Somali lion (Panthera leo somaliensis or Panthera leo webbiensis) in the Horn of Africa (treated as belonging to the Barbary subspecies by Wozencraft, and the Masai subspecies by Haas et al.

Photo of a lion in the Horn of Africa by Feisal Omar of Reuters (https://www.businessinsider.com/the-self...of-china-1

*This image is copyright of its original author


6) 18921895: The Masai lion (Panthera leo massaica) in East Africa 

Photo of a Masai lion by Alison Buttigieg (http://www.alisonbuttigieg.com/border_galleries/lions/

*This image is copyright of its original author


7) 1900: The Kilimanjaro lion (Panthera leo sabakiensis) in East Africa (treated as belonging to the Masai subspecies by Wozencraft and Haas et al.), and the Cameroon lion (Panthera leo kampzi) in Cameroon or West-Central Africa (treated as belonging to the Senegalese subspecies by Haas et al., and as a subspecies of its own by Wozencraft) 

Photo of a Kenyan lion in front of Mount Kilimanjaro by Stuart Abraham of Alamy (https://www.alamy.com/stock-photo-male-l...71851.html

*This image is copyright of its original author


Photo of a Cameroon lion by photo316 (https://www.flickr.com/photos/29844852@N06/2790086463

*This image is copyright of its original author


8) 1913: The Ugandan lion (Panthera leo nyanzae) in East Africa (treated as belonging to the Masai subspecies by Haas et al., and as a subspecies of its own by Wozencraft) 

Photo in the website of Marianah Tourist Hotel (https://marianahthotel.wordpress.com/saf...onal-park/

*This image is copyright of its original author


9) 1914: The Katanga lion (Panthera leo bleyenberghi) in what is now southern D R Congo and Southwest Africa, and the Sotik lion (Panthera leo hollisteri) in what is now Kenya in East Africa (treated as belonging to the Masai subspecies by Haas et al., and as a subspecies of its own by Wozencraft) 

Photo of a Namibian lion by Minden (https://www.mindenpictures.com/search/pr...09167.html

*This image is copyright of its original author


Stuffed Sotik lion shot by US President Theodore Roosevelt, photo by Jayne Orenstein in The Washington Post (https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/spea...ad97648320

*This image is copyright of its original author


10) 1924: The Congolese lion (Panthera leo azandica) in the northeastern part of what is now D R Congo 

Photo by Adrian Treves (https://savevirunga.com/2012/07/02/1-000...irunga-10/

*This image is copyright of its original author


11) 1929: The Transvaal lion (Panthera leo krugeri) in what is now the Greater Kruger or Transvaal region of South Africa, and Southeast Africa  

Photo of a Kruger lion by Bernard Dupont (https://www.flickr.com/photos/berniedup/16757912564/

*This image is copyright of its original author


12) 1945: The Kalahari lion (Panthera leo vernayi) in Southwest Africa (treated as belonging to the Transvaal subspecies by Haas et al.

Photo by Alison Buttigieg (http://www.alisonbuttigieg.com/border_galleries/lions/

*This image is copyright of its original author


In 2017, the Cat Classification Taskforce of the Cat Specialist Group (Pages 7173: https://repository.si.edu/bitstream/hand...sAllowed=y) revised lion subspecies. They recognised lions in Asia and Northern, Western and Central Africa as belonging to the subspecies Panthera leo leo, and those in Eastern and Southern Africa as belonging to the subspecies Panthera leo melanochaita, but there is a problem, the 2 subspecies appear to overlap in the Northeast African country of Ethiopia, which would mean that Ethiopian lions (formerly Panthera leo roosevelti or Felis leo roosevelti, in honor of the US President Theodore Roosevelt (https://archive.org/stream/smithsonianmi...3/mode/2up), but also treated as belonging to the Masai subspecies by Haas et al. and Wozencraft) are neither purely Panthera leo leo nor Panthera leo melanochaita, but a mixture (Panthera leo leo × Panthera leo melanochaita), and the Cat Specialist Group put a question mark over the Horn of Africa in Page 72: 

*This image is copyright of its original author

Credit: the Cat Specialist Group 

Ethiopian lions have been in the news for their genetic makeup before. In 2012, Bruche et al. (https://link.springer.com/article/10.100...012-0668-5) had tested them, and found them to be genetically different to other lions. 

Photo of a captive Ethiopian lion at Addis Abeba Zoo in an article by ZeHabesha (https://www.zehabesha.com/ethiopias-iron...ding-fast/

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  Reverse Image Search
Posted by: Rishi - 08-09-2018, 04:26 PM - Forum: Tips, Guides and Tutorial - Replies (1)
Most of the photos shared by the posters on Wildfact are copyright of someone else. 

Often people surf through Internet once in a while & hoard all good stuff they find. Later on while posting those one might have no idea where he/she had found them, or who the photographer was.
Even if someone bookmarks every one of them & individual photo sources are still hectic to find from the pile.

To encourage the habit sharing of links & credits to photographs' source website/profile/article, here's a reliable and easy to use "Reverse Image Search" engine:
Prepostseo Image Search


What it is & how it works.

Upload the image normally like you'd do otherwise. For example:

*This image is copyright of its original author

Simply copy the images url (in edit mode, or by opening it in new tab).

Open the Image Search & paste the link, or directly use the upload image feature. Press "Search Inage".

*This image is copyright of its original author

It will show available search options with multiple major search engines.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Unless the original image is in some private profile or gallery, there is a good chance that you'll find other copies of the image on the internet.

*This image is copyright of its original author

In this case, a WWF article:

*This image is copyright of its original author

Give it a try. By sharing the source not only are you giving owners their due credit, you are also making additional details available to the viewers of your post & may hit other interesting material related to it.

It is also a great way to double check the authenticity of images & find quality versions of them.
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  The Good and Bad about WildFact - Need your suggestions
Posted by: sanjay - 08-02-2018, 08:53 AM - Forum: Suggestion, Feedback and Complaint - Replies (13)
Hello Guys,
WildFact is more than 5 year old and It was created due to instability in AVA. There is lot of things I can say about WF, but I leave it on others.
The purpose of this thread is to tell us What things you like and What you don't like? what can be improved and how we are when compared to other website or forums on internet
Knowing this will help us to improve the forum further so that we can share the passion of wildlife with each other on wildfact. Below is my questions

1. What do you like about WildFact?

2. What you don't like?

3. What improvement do you want to see on this forum?

4. Is any important feature we are missing?

5. How is WildFact compared to other forums and websites (In animal category)?

6. Are you happy with the moderation? Or do you think we need to improve?

If you have any other questions or any suggestion, don't be shy, Share your thoughts here. Base on your feed back we will try to improve the WildFact.
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  Golden Jackal (Canis aureus)
Posted by: Pckts - 07-28-2018, 03:16 AM - Forum: Canids (Canidae) & Hyaenids (Hyaenidae) - Replies (1)
Hedayeat Ullah‎ 

(10 May 2018). Loc: Nakhanda Barpeta.

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  Dinofelis barlowi
Posted by: epaiva - 07-23-2018, 12:02 AM - Forum: Prehistoric animals - Replies (2)
This species displays the classic features of the genus, with skull similar in size to that of the jaguar, moderately flattened canines, large carnassial and a rather primitive mastoid region. The first fossils of this species known to science were a damaged skull and an upper canine found at the South African site of Sterkfontein, as described by R. Broom in 1937.
Reconstructed life appearance of Dinofelis barlowi, shoulder height 70 cm.        
Skull and reconstructed life appearance of head of Dinofelis barlowi
Book Sabertooth (Mauricio Anton)            

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author
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  Shark predation
Posted by: Genghis - 07-22-2018, 11:45 PM - Forum: Aquatic Animals and Amphibians - Replies (2)
I'm very surprised that this forum doesn't have a thread dedicated to 'Shark predations'... considering the fact that Sharks, especially the Great White, is one of the greatest and easily the most fearsome and devastating predator on earth! So, i'll start one...

"Sharks are apex predators throughout the ocean, yet relatively few studies have quantified or determined factors influencing their hunting behaviour and predatory success rates. The waters surrounding Seal Island in False Bay, South Africa, provide a unique opportunity to study predator-prey interactions involving Great White Sharks (hereafter white sharks). During the winter, white sharks visit Seal Island to hunt Cape fur seals. About 48% of surface attacks on seals result in successful kills. Attack frequency is high, averaging 6.68 per day, with as many as 43 recorded in a single day. Sharks attack seals on the surface via a sudden vertical rush, which propels predator and prey out of the water in an awesome display of power and acrobatic prowess"...

http://sharkresearch.rsmas.miami.edu/res...predation/

Giant 20+ft Great White Shark named 'Deep Blue' hunts for Elephant seals off Guadalupe Island:





Great White Shark attacks and tears apart an Elephant seal:





Great white breaches out of the water:





Shark attack on Dolphin:


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*This image is copyright of its original author



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*This image is copyright of its original author


You can't get scarier then this!!..


*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author
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