There is a world somewhere between reality and fiction. Although ignored by many, it is very real and so are those living in it. This forum is about the natural world. Here, wild animals will be heard and respected. The forum offers a glimpse into an unknown world as well as a room with a view on the present and the future. Anyone able to speak on behalf of those living in the emerald forest and the deep blue sea is invited to join.
--- Peter Broekhuijsen ---

  Tiger Intraspecific conflict
Posted by: Acinonyx sp. - 3 hours ago - Forum: Tiger - No Replies
This is a thread about intraspecific conflict in tigers.
Print this item
  The ability of bears to independently move fingers
Posted by: Florin - 04-09-2021, 06:49 AM - Forum: Bears - No Replies
Hello everyone !

I would like to know if bears can control their fingers to make different moves from each other.

Are bears able to pinch, like we, the humans are able to do ?


*This image is copyright of its original author


Can they move the 4 fingers (those other than the thumb) closer or further, by using lateral abduction or median abduction ? (shown below in the left)


*This image is copyright of its original author


THANK YOU IN ADVANCE FOR YOUR ANSWERS ,


Florin
Print this item
  Megaraptor namunhuaiquii
Posted by: DinoFan83 - 04-06-2021, 08:20 AM - Forum: Dinosaurs - Replies (2)
Megaraptor ("giant thief") is a genus of unusual theropod dinosaur that lived in the Turonian to Coniacian ages of the Late Cretaceous. Its fossils have been discovered in the rocks of the Portezuelo Formation in what is now Neuquén Province, Argentina. The holotype specimen was thought to be a giant dromaeosaurid at the time of naming in 1998 due to a very large claw interpreted as belonging to the second toe (as in dromaeosaurids). A more complete specimen described in 2004, however, showed the claw to not belong to the second toe at all but rather to the first digit of the manus, nullifying the previously proposed dromaeosaurid affinities.
The manus itself was found to be quite distinct from other known theropods at the time of its discovery, so it was not initially clear whether Megaraptor belonged to any known family of Gondwanan theropods or to a new family of theropods altogether. Early phylogenetic analyses placed Megaraptor as a basal tetanuran (both as an allosauroid and a spinosauroid), with the allosauroid theory becoming more widely accepted when other close relatives of Megaraptor (like Aerosteon and Orkoraptor) were discovered and found to form the family Megaraptora with it. 
New juvenile material of Megaraptor published in 2014 has established Megaraptor (and all other megaraptorans) were tyrannosauroids instead of allosauroids or spinosauroids, and that has been upheld very well, with almost all phylogenetic analyses since then recovering them as such. But, while bearing much morphological resemblance to the primitive tyrannosauroid family Proceratosauridae, megaraptorans were very different to the well-known tyrannosaurids in that they underwent forelimb enlargement instead of reduction and had very different ecology as a result of it.
Megaraptor itself was no exception to this. It would have had large, powerfully-built forelimbs bearing three-fingered hands, with an enlarged claw on the first digit. The humerus was long and robust with a prominent deltopectoral crest, and the ulna had a hypertrophied olecranon process, indicating the arm muscles (like the triceps and deltoids) were very well-developed for use in prey capture. The manus was very elongated to facilitate grasping of prey items, as was the first digit's claw, with the largest claws found so far being well over 30 centimeters long and quite sharp to boot. In fact, current estimates suggest the forelimbs of Megaraptor were both longer and more robust (therefore almost certainly more powerful) relative to the animal's size than the forelimbs of carnivorous mammals like big cats or bears, strongly indicating it had a need just as great as, if not greater than, said carnivorous mammals for forelimb use in prey acquisition. 
The rest of the animal showed similarities to various tyrannosauroids. Cranial material shows the skull was long-snouted with many small and sharp teeth (similar to the tyrannosauroids Dilong and Xiongguanlong), and the preserved portions of the axial skeleton show the torso would have been deep and wide (akin to tyrannosaurids). The hindlimbs were very distally elongated with particularly gracile metatarsals, no different to the nearly universal cursorial adaptations in almost all of Tyrannosauroidea, suggesting Megaraptor was probably a good runner.
Megaraptor was a large theropod. Known adult specimens were at least 6.5 meters long, and have been estimated to weigh 1000 kg by Gregory S. Paul. Owing to its size, it may have been the apex predator of the Portezuelo, dominant over the much smaller Unenlagia and unnamed abelisaurids.
Print this item
  Jaguars of Northern South America
Posted by: Balam - 04-04-2021, 10:47 PM - Forum: Jaguar - Replies (3)
This thread will cover the populations found in the forests and basins of South America north of the Amazon basin (excluding the Llanos), most predominantly the Magdalena Medio region of Colombia, the Maracaibo Lake basin of Venezuela, the Darien intersection between Colombia and Panama, the Venezuelan tepuys etc.

Jaguars in the Magdalena Medio Valley of Colombia
These jaguars are renowned for being buffalo killers:


*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author
By Jhon Mario

Jaguars from the Maracaibo Lake Basin, Venezuela. 
These Jaguars are tracked by the Sebraba Project, the most important jaguar conservationist organization in Venezuela:

Female


*This image is copyright of its original author

Male


*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author

Jaguar from the Darien Gap in the Pacific rainforests in northern Colombia
Bordering Panama, stretching to Ecuador and Peru.


*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

By Juan Delgado
Print this item
  The mystery of tiger Konda
Posted by: woshiniya - 04-04-2021, 09:08 PM - Forum: Tiger - Replies (19)
I find tiger Konda had been confused with another tiger,but I don't know who is the tiger.and I post some Konda picture next.


Attached Files Thumbnail(s)
           
Print this item
  Marshosaurus bicentesimus
Posted by: DinoFan83 - 04-02-2021, 05:43 AM - Forum: Dinosaurs - Replies (1)
Marshosaurus is a genus of carnivorous dinosaur belonging to either the Allosauroidea or the Megalosauroidea known from the Late Jurassic of the US states Utah and Colorado. 
It was a medium sized theropod from known fossils, with specimens discovered so far suggesting a size range of 4.5-5.9 meters and 200-450 kg. The holotype ilium can be estimated at 44.2 centimeters when complete based on comparisons with its more complete relative Eustreptospondylus. More specimens are known, such as the paratypes which consist of more pelvic material.
Known skull material indicates Marshosaurus had a large skull for its size, with the largest discovered skulls being 60 cm long and the largest specimens possibly having skulls about 78.7 cm long. Its forelimbs were large, heavily-muscled, and massively built relative to its size, being tipped with especially large claws. The hindlimbs were also very robustly constructed as well as proportionally long, suggesting an animal evolved for both strength and speed to capture prey.
Marshosaurus lived alongside many more famous and larger dinosaur species, such as Allosaurus, Torvosaurus, Apatosaurus, Stegosaurus, and Camptosaurus.
Print this item
  Purussaurus brasiliensis
Posted by: DinoFan83 - 03-28-2021, 11:16 PM - Forum: Prehistoric animals - Replies (2)
Purussaurus brasiliensis is an extinct species of giant caiman that lived in South America during the Miocene epoch, 20.4 to 5.3 million years ago. It is known from skull material found in the Brazilian and Peruvian Amazon, Colombian Villavieja Formation, Panamanian Culebra Formation and the Urumaco and Socorro Formations of northern Venezuela.
The largest published skull (UFAC 1403) is 134 cm in midline length with a 143.9 cm mandible, and a partial mandible (DGM 527-R) is estimated at 175 cm when complete with the estimated midline length being 163 cm. Based on a modern-day relative (the American alligator), these specimens of Purussaurus have been estimated at 10.1-12.2 meters in length and 4200-7600 kg, similar to modern elephants in size and among the largest crocodilians ever. However, as only skulls have been found this is not entirely certain.
The largest known Purussaurus specimens probably had a bite force of 93720 newtons (9560 kg), giving the animal a very powerful bite for its size and among the strongest bites in the animal kingdom, even stronger than modern estimates for the bite force of Tyrannosaurus rex
The teeth, although designed for executing a high bite force over cutting flesh, have small ridges along two of the edges which resemble those in ziphodonts. This indicates that Purussaurus hunted large vertebrates, as these ridges are used for puncturing and holding on to flesh. They are slightly flattened at the top and are roughly conical, which means that they would have been unlikely to break on impact with a thick bone.
The large size and estimated strength of this animal appears to have allowed it to include a wide range of prey in its diet, making it an apex predator in its ecosystem. As an adult, it would have preyed upon large to very large vertebrates such as the xenarthrans and notoungulates present, with no real competition from sympatric, smaller, carnivores.
Researchers have proposed that the large size of Purussaurus, though offering many advantages, may also have led to its vulnerability. The constantly changing environment on a large geological scale may have reduced its long-term survival, favoring smaller species more resilient to ecological shifts. In other words, it was over-specialised and couldn't survive when its habitat changed, unlike smaller related species of caiman.
Print this item
  Bahariasaurus ingens
Posted by: DinoFan83 - 03-28-2021, 07:08 AM - Forum: Dinosaurs - Replies (1)
Bahariasaurus (meaning "Bahariya lizard") is a genus of theropod dinosaur found in the Bahariya Formation in Egypt, and the Farak Formation of Niger of North Africa, which date to the late Cretaceous Period, (Cenomanian age), about 95 million years ago. With the proportions of the likely close relatives Proceratosauridae and Megaraptora, it would have been 13-15 meters long and roughly 8000-10500 kg, placing it one of the largest land carnivores ever. Those sizes suggest the animal was much heavier than Tyrannosaurus rex and in the same size range as the contemporary gigantic theropods Carcharodontosaurus and Spinosaurus.
The type species, B. ingens, was described by Ernst Stromer in 1934, though Stromer's finds were destroyed during World War II. The exact placement of Bahariasaurus is uncertain with it having been variously assigned to several theropod groups, namely Ceratosauria, Megalosauroidea, Allosauroidea, and Tyrannosauroidea. Modern phylogenetic analyses favor the last option, recovering it both as a member of Megaraptora within the Tyrannosauroidea and as a non-megaraptoran basal tyrannosauroid. 
However, it has been postulated that not all of Stromer's material belonged to one taxon (explaining the phylogenetic instability) and that Bahariasaurus may have been the same animal as Deltadromeus, another giant basal tyrannosauroid from the same time and place. More specimens would be needed to more accurately classify it, and to determine its relationship to Deltadromeus. Researcher Mickey Mortimer believes Bahariasaurus is diagnostic, although this remains tentative for the time being.
Print this item
  Jim Corbett Tiger reserve
Posted by: wfcholidays - 03-13-2021, 01:28 PM - Forum: Packages & Offers - No Replies
[color=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.75)]Jim Corbett is a national park located near to Ramnagar town in Uttrakhand. It is one of the most popular national park in India when it comes to Tiger sighting, as there around more than 250 Tigers as per recent census of 2020. Tourists are allowed to opt for Morning/Evening jungle safaris inside the deep forest area and it is the only Tiger reserve in India which allows people to stay even inside the forest area at the government run forest rest houses.
[/color]
[color=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.75)]Flora at the park[/color]
[color=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.75)]There are more than 450 types of species of plants have been recorded in the reserve. As per the reports around 65 to 70% of Corbett area is dominated by Sal forests. The famous zone Dhikala is well known for its vast Grassland area which is favourite spot of sighting the Elephant herds.
[/color]
[color=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.75)]Fauna at the park[/color]
[color=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.75)]Corbett Tiger reserve is home to around 500 resident and migratory birds species, some famous ones are Serpent Eagle, Red junglefowl, Parakeet, Kingfisher, Asian Paradise flycatcher etc. Royal Bengal Tiger is the king of the Jungle here and many other cat species can also be spotted i.e Leopard, jungle cat & fishing cat. The mammals include Elephants, Barking deer, Sambhar deer, Hog deer, Chital, Sloth and himalayan black bears, mongoose, fox and many more. Dhikala grassland is the famous area of the park to spot the herds of Elephants.[/color]
[color=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.75)]The park is to home to reptiles and famous species are India marsh Crocodile, Gharial, King Cobra, Python, Viper, monitor Lizard and Tortoise.
[/color]
[color=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.75)]Safari zones in Jim Corbett[/color]
[color=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.75)]There are total 8 zones in Jim Corbett Tiger reserve as of now which are available to tourists for day safaris. These are Bijrani, Dhikala, Jhirna, Dhela, Garjia, Durga devi, Pakhro and Sonanadi. Except Pakhro and Sonanadi all other zones are close to Ramnagar and these 2 zones (Pakhro and Sonanadi) can be visited from Kotdwar near to Lansdowne.
[/color]
[color=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.75)]Type of safaris and availability in various zones.
[/color]
[color=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.75)]Dhikala– There are 2 types of safari options available at this zone. One is canter which is used for morning/evening safaris and available for all tourists as per the availablity, and second option is jeep safari which is available only for those tourists who make the booking at government run forest rest house.[/color]
[color=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.75)]Total– 4 canters are available for safaris in morning and in afternoon as well. Each canter has 16 seats so total 64 tourists can visit the park in morning and exact number of pax in afternoon.[/color]
[color=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.75)]12 years and above are considered as adults and full seat fare will be applicable for them. Children 6 to 11 years old can travel with adults at approx half of the adult cost. A maximum of 6 adults and 2 children (6 to 11 years old) can travel in one permit.
[/color]
[color=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.75)]Dhikala day safaris are open for tourists from 15th November to 14th of June every year.
[/color]
[color=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.75)]Bijrani– Only jeep safari option is available for tourists to visit the park. There are 30 jeeps in morning and 30 jeeps in afternoon available for tourists. Maximum of 6 adults and 2 children (6 to 11 years old) can travel in one jeep. This zone is open for toursits from 15th October to 30th June every year.
[/color]
[color=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.75)]Jhirna– Jeep safari is the only option of visiting the park and there are 30 jeeps in morning and 30 jeeps in afternoon available for tourists. Maximum of 6 adults and 2 children (6 to 11 years old) can travel in one jeep. This zone is open through out year, however, forest department does not operate safaris on rainy days.
[/color]
[color=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.75)]Dhela– Jeep safari is the only option of visiting the park. And, there are 15 jeeps in morning and 15 jeeps in afternoon available for tourists. Maximum of 6 adults and 2 children (6 to 11 years old) can travel in one jeep. This zone is open through out the year, however, government does not operate safaris on rainy days.
[/color]
[color=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.75)]Durga devi– At this zone Jeep safari is the only option of visiting the park. And, there are 10 jeeps in morning and 10 jeeps in afternoon available for tourists. Maximum of 6 adults and 2 children (6 to 11 years old) can travel in one jeep. This zone is open for tourists from 15th October to 15th June every year.
[/color]
[color=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.75)]Garjia– Only jeep safari option is available for tourists to visit the park. There are 30 jeeps in morning and 30 jeeps in afternoon available for tourists. Maximum of 6 adults and 2 children (6 to 11 years old) can travel in one jeep. This zone is open for toursits from 15th October to 30th June every year.
[/color]
[color=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.75)]Pakhro– At this zone Jeep safari is the only option of visiting the park and there are 10 jeeps in morning and 10 jeeps in afternoon available for tourists. Maximum of 6 adults and 2 children (6 to 11 years old) can travel in one jeep. This zone is open for toursits from 15th October to 15th June every year.
[/color]
[color=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.75)]Sonanadi– This zone Jeep safari is the only option of visiting the park and, there are 15 jeeps in morning and 15 jeeps in afternoon available for tourists. Maximum of 6 adults and 2 children (6 to 11 years old) can travel in one jeep. This zone is open for toursits from 15th October to 15th June every year.
[/color]
[color=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.75)]Important points-

Jeep safari in Jim Corbett is not shared with other guests in any of the zone. One full jeep safari cost consists of Permit/Forest guide and gypsy hire cost.
Safari permits are non refundable and non amendable.
It is suggestible to book safari prior minimum 30 days of actual safari date in order to avoid non-availability.
During summer morning safaris start at 6:00 AM and last entry time can be upto 7:00 AM, and afternoon safaris start at 2:30 PM and last entry time can be upto 3:30 PM.
During winter morning safaris start at 7:00 AM and last entry time can be upto 7:45 AM, and afternoon safaris start at 1:30 PM and last entry time can be upto 2:30 PM.
Canter safari starts at 6:00 AM for morning shift and 12:30 PM for afternoon shift during summer.
Canter safari starts at 6:30 AM for morning shift and 12:00 PM for afternoon shift during winter
Suggestible to carry Binoculars. However, you can rent it out from the safari entry gate as well.
Always book safari prior to resort booking or make sure that sufficient gypsies are available as safari permit are always in high demand and might go sold out any time.
Jeep safari duration varies between 3 to 3 hours 30 minutes, where as, canter safari duration is 5 hours approximately.
Canter is a 16 seater mini bus (open from sides for view and covered from top).
Food, liquor, smoking not allowed inside the Tiger reserve.
ID proof is mandatory for booking and for the entry as well at the Tiger reserve. Pan card is acceptable.
Tourists can travel with infants as there is no restriction from the forest department for Jim corbett jeep safari.
Forest department does not allow pet inside the Tiger reserve during jungle safari.
During winter it is too cold inside the Tiger reserve, hence always carry gloves, enough sweaters/jackets etc.
There are plenty of private resorts available around the park, where as government run forest rest houses are inside the deep forest area. Suitable for wildlife lovers and photographers.
Canteen facility is available at Bijrani and Dhikala zone for tourists during day safaris.
[/color]
[color=rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.75)]We hope that you will find the above article about Jim corbett jeep safari informative and relevant. Please feel free to ask anything.[/color]
Print this item
  Jim Corbett Tiger reserve
Posted by: wfcholidays - 03-13-2021, 12:08 PM - Forum: Packages & Offers - No Replies
Hello Friends,

We are from WFC Holidays and organizing tour packages, forest house stays and safari permits for Jim Corbett Tiger reserve (As per the guidelines of Corbett Tiger reserve forest department). If you are wanting to stay inside the forest rest house which are located deep inside the forest area, you can contact us.

here is our Corbett focused website- https://jim-corbett.co.in


Attached Files Thumbnail(s)
   
Print this item
Welcome, Guest
You have to register before you can post on our site.

Email:
  

Password
  




Search Forums

(Advanced Search)
Forum Statistics
» Members: 1,393
» Latest member: theviral
» Forum threads: 1,085
» Forum posts: 110,780

Full Statistics
Online Users
There are currently 130 online users.
» 4 Member(s) | 126 Guest(s)
alexandro, chaos, woshiniya
Latest Threads
The Terai Tiger
Last Post: woshiniya | 41 minutes ago
Tiger Intraspecific confl...
Last Post: Acinonyx sp. | 3 hours ago
Jaguars of Northern South...
Last Post: Balam | 4 hours ago
Amazonian Jaguar
Last Post: Balam | 4 hours ago
Cerrado Jaguar
Last Post: Balam | 4 hours ago
Jaguar Directory
Last Post: Balam | 4 hours ago
Felids Interactions - Int...
Last Post: Rage2277 | 6 hours ago
Polar Bears - Data, Pictu...
Last Post: epaiva | 7 hours ago
Coalitions of Kruger Nati...
Last Post: TinoArmando | 8 hours ago
Asiatic Lion - Data, Pict...
Last Post: Rage2277 | 9 hours ago
Massive Head, Neck & Musc...
Last Post: Rage2277 | 9 hours ago
Tiger Predation
Last Post: Rage2277 | 9 hours ago
Lions of Sabi Sands
Last Post: Tonpa | 11 hours ago
Lions of Timbavati
Last Post: TinoArmando | Yesterday, 09:34 PM
Cheetah Reintroduction in...
Last Post: Ovie11 | Yesterday, 08:04 PM
About Us
Go Social     Subscribe  

Welcome to WILDFACT forum, a website that focuses on sharing the joy that wildlife has on offer. We welcome all wildlife lovers to join us in sharing that joy. As a member you can share your research, knowledge and experience on animals with the community.
wildfact.com is intended to serve as an online resource for wildlife lovers of all skill levels from beginners to professionals and from all fields that belong to wildlife anyhow. Our focus area is wild animals from all over world. Content generated here will help showcase the work of wildlife experts and lovers to the world. We believe by the help of your informative article and content we will succeed to educate the world, how these beautiful animals are important to survival of all man kind.
Many thanks for visiting wildfact.com. We hope you will keep visiting wildfact regularly and will refer other members who have passion for wildlife.

Forum software by © MyBB