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Lions of Sabi Sands

Portugal Michael Offline
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(08-30-2018, 02:05 AM)T Rabbit Wrote: The nomadic mhangenis are in really bad situation. Starving and full of mange. They are too young and weak to live by their own. Many of them could die yet.
How old are they two ?
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United States Peteporker Offline
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Londolozi Blog

Lion Update: Lots of Question Marks


Do you ever get that feeling like something’s been sitting in equilibrium for too long, and change is imminent? Not necessarily drastic change, but something has to give soon, or at least shift.

For a while now the number of nomadic groups of lions has almost outnumbered the number of stable prides, which if I’m honest has made things hard to predict. Let’s break Londolozi up into quarters and we’ll run through the lion movements in each area:


*This image is copyright of its original author


North

Once the stronghold of the Tsalala pride, the only consistency here these days is the single Tsalala lioness who has been focusing her movements in and around the Manylethi riverbed, and moving south to the Sand River on occasion. Since there has been no regular territorial pride for months, the area has seen incursions from the west by the Mhangeni lionesses, and the north and east by both the Nkahuma and Styx prides. Coalition-wise the Birmingham males are rare visitors, and with no pride presenting mating opportunities, one can understand why.

As far as I’m aware it was the Birmingham coalition that fathered the Styx and Nkahuma cubs and sub-adults (I’d love some clarity here if anyone can help), so logically speaking there is no reason why these prides would be reluctant to move in and attempt to establish territory in Londolozi’s north. The Ntsevu pride forced out the Sparta females, so why would adult lions from these two bigger prides not try and move in to claim territory? This is one of the main reasons I mentioned an uneasy equilibrium earlier. That part of the reserve is absolutely primed for a resident pride, and I’m sure that one will establish itself within the year, it’s just hard to say who it will be.


West-Central

Along with the deep south, this quadrant has been the most unpredictable, with the Mhangeni sub-adults and the Tsalala males popping up regularly but in no discernible pattern, and the Mhangeni females have been moving in and out of the Sand River right up in the top-left corner. This latter pride’s movements have been regularly consistent around the river as a couple of the females are raising new litters of cubs, but they are still spending a lot of time stashing the cubs in the dense palm thickets and reed-beds, so viewing has been tricky.
The Tsalala males as mentioned in a blog a few days ago, are occupying a kind of no-man’s land between the Birmingham males to the east and the Matimba coalition to the west, so it is likely they will continue to operate in this north-south line for some time.


East-Central

The Birmingham males and Ntsevu pride make up 95% of the lion viewing in this section of Londolozi, with the occasional visit by the Tsalala lioness near the Londolozi Camps. During the winter months we have traditionally seen the prides that occupy this quadrant operate mainly around the Sand River where game necessarily congregates during dry times, then move further afield in the summer when water and good grazing is available everywhere. The Sparta pride were well known for doing this, and it seems as thought the Ntsevu female are following in their footsteps.


South

Much like the west-central quadrant, the South has been unpredictable, with the nomadic groups of lions like the Mhangeni sub-adults being the most often viewed. On the subject of the Mhangeni sub-adults, it seems they have had a couple of run-ins with other lions recently, or at least other predators. A group of only five young males was seen a few days ago sleeping near a waterhole deep in the south, and the day before Ranger Alex Jordan had found a badly injured young male not far away. From an original group of more than 10, it seems that they have either splintered or lost a member every couple of months.


The Ntsevu females patrol the eastern fringes of this quadrant as well, and make regular forays away from the Sand River to roughly mid way across Londolozi. 


As usual it’s a case of more questions than answers, but if it was anything else, things would run the risk of getting stale. Instead, it’s a constantly stimulating environment, and we’ve never been happier to be left scratching our heads about what these lions are doing than now…
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Brazil T Rabbit Offline
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Michael oldest boy 2 years and half and youngest boys 2 years old. As we can see they are too young to be nomadic lions. 
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Bangladesh sundarbans Offline
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I find it strange that the Mhangeni sub-adults left their natal pride at such a young age. After the split neither they nor their mothers have fared too well. With the demise of their dominant males, wouldn't it have made sense for the pride to stick together so that they could bring down bigger prey regularly? Any explanation as to why they left their pride so early?
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United States Peteporker Offline
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(09-04-2018, 10:03 PM)sundarbans Wrote: I find it strange that the Mhangeni sub-adults left their natal pride at such a young age. After the split neither they nor their mothers have fared too well. With the demise of their dominant males, wouldn't it have made sense for the pride to stick together so that they could bring down bigger prey regularly? Any explanation as to why they left their pride so early?

They were abandoned by their mothers. Their mothers were probably in estrus again so probably instinctively left them to mate. Also, having to hunt for 12 sub adult lions was probably becoming tiring and likely contributed to their mothers abandoning them is my guess.
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Australia Herekitty Offline
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( This post was last modified: 09-18-2018, 02:31 PM by Herekitty )

The Torchwood pride of lions seem to be doing incredibly well at the moment. We don’t see them all too often, as they spend a fair deal of their time in the Kruger National Park, but it’s so special when they do come in.
Credit: image by Andrew Khosa at Jac's Sabi House, posted August 4, 2018.


*This image is copyright of its original author


We located all 16 members the Torchwood pride of lions having a drink at a pan yesterday! Credit: image by Andrew Khosa at Jac's Sabi House, posted September 2, 2018.


*This image is copyright of its original author
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Australia Herekitty Offline
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( This post was last modified: 09-18-2018, 02:31 PM by Herekitty )

The Avoca male lions were seen again this morning! They had a quick drink, and were still with the lioness. Credit: image by Andrew Khosa at Jaci's Sabi House, posted September 4, 2018


*This image is copyright of its original author

Credit: image by JP van Zyl at Sabi Sands Gamer Reserve, posted September 4, 2018

*This image is copyright of its original author

Mating lions is something special to see. The aggression & incredible noises produced are incredible to witness. Credit: image by Andrew Khosa at Jaci's Sabi House, posted September 4, 2018

*This image is copyright of its original author
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United States vinodkumarn Offline
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Tsalala/Marthly males today in Lion Sands PGR.
Photo credit to Mark Winckler-Lion Sands Private Game ReserveI(Instagram post)


*This image is copyright of its original author
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Australia Herekitty Offline
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I'm curious what constitutes the boundaries of Sabi Sands as there doesn't appear to be an official demarcation outside of Sabi Sands Game Reserve, but since the thread author started with a post from Timbavati, I'll accept that it as pretty broad. So here's a video from Tintswalo Game Lodge, August 29, 2018. Interested to know what relationship the young Birminghams here have to the famous ones.

Amazing display of dominance as the Red Road Male shows this young Birmingham Male who is boss! The Red Road and the Koppies Male look like they might be joining a coalition with the two young Birmingham males...  
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United States swtlei4u Offline
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(09-06-2018, 07:56 AM)Herekitty Wrote: A Spotted Hyena feeding on a Lion carcass, a Lion that was killed by three upcoming rogue Lions. Captured in the Singita Concession, Kruger National Park.


Credit: video by Quniton Paul Josop at Singita, posted September 1, 2018

isn't singita north west of londoliza? any id on who this lion is?
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Brazil T Rabbit Offline
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swtlei4u no. Its another lodge in very far east kruger national park. This sub-adult was killed by the dominant sish males and the hyena feed on him after that. 
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United States swtlei4u Offline
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(09-06-2018, 07:02 PM)T Rabbit Wrote: swtlei4u no. Its another lodge in very far east kruger national park. This sub-adult was killed by the dominant sish males and the hyena feed on him after that. 
so these previous post should be removed and moved to kruger lion thread, this thread is only for sabi sands.
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United States Peteporker Offline
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(09-06-2018, 07:02 PM)T Rabbit Wrote: swtlei4u no. Its another lodge in very far east kruger national park. This sub-adult was killed by the dominant sish males and the hyena feed on him after that. 

I thought that I read somewhere that this was one of the 9 shishangaan sub adult males that was killed by 3 nomadic males.  Out of the 9 males, I think 4 have already died already.
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Australia Herekitty Offline
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Update on the Sand River Pride. Credit: Lion Sands Game Reserve, words and images by Mark Winckler August 20, 2108

The Sand River pride is the largest group of lions we currently see at Lion Sands – and a personal favourite of many. They are beautiful lions in great condition, and with several cubs, they are always a magnificent sight.

*This image is copyright of its original author

The Sand River pride made their first appearance here about three years ago. At the time, the group consisted of five females and one young male, together with the two Toulon Males. Then, in 2016, the Toulon Males were pushed out by the five Mantimahle Males, who took over the pride. One of the Toulon Males was confirmed dead, while the other wasn’t seen again. The young male left – he wouldn’t have been tolerated by the new dominant males. He moved into Kruger and has been seen in the southern part of the park. As a lone, nomadic male he has a long road ahead for survival.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Following the takeover, the Sand River pride’s females mated with the Mantimahle Males. The two younger females and one of the older females all fell pregnant and produced four cubs each! All twelve cubs were seen together from a very young age by guests and guides on safari. Unfortunately, in the last year, a cub from each of the first and second litter has died, leaving 10 cubs.

*This image is copyright of its original author

One of the older females also died in early 2017, and one of the Mantimahle Males has since split from the other four. This has left a pride of four Mantimahle Males, four females (two about five years old and two between 12 and 14), and 10 cubs between seven to 14 months old.

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author

But considering few cubs survive to adulthood, due to predators and other factors of a harsh life in the bush, this pride is doing well in nurturing them. With a mighty coalition guarding them, a healthy bloodline and lion-perfect habitat, we suspect these cubs will continue to thrive here.


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author
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Australia Herekitty Offline
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( This post was last modified: 09-18-2018, 02:07 PM by Herekitty )

This looks to be the dominant darker skinned northern young Avoca male who was spotted by Safari Live on his own in Djuma a few months back. He has a menacing look about him and I think it was Brent Leo Smith who said that he was the tallest lion he'd seen at Djuma since Hairy Belly Matimba.


The African king... A wonderful sighting close to the Buffelshoek Tented Camp, Manyeleti Game Reserve. Credits: image by Armand Grobler posted September 11, 2018.

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