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Crocodile and Big cats Interaction

United States Pckts Offline
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Spalea Offline
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Account from Zimbabwe where a pride of lions according to this wild life watcher began regularly to kill crocodiles...







" The adaptation of the Tashinga Pride, to the elements of the terrain and climate, and how these traits are starting to migrate to other areas. "
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crocodiledunphd
Happy World Tiger Day! Here in Chitwan, tiger and gharial range overlaps, and we occasionally record gharial-tiger interactions. Here a tiger walks along the beach, whilst a mother gharial is guarding her hatchlings down in the river. The female gharial is showing a defensive response to a potential threat: she is facing the tiger, and following the tiger's upstream movement. The babies are in the water around her. This is a large female gharial: a tiger would be unlikely (and pretty crazy) to take her on, and I'm not sure who I'd put my money on. However, there is at least one record of an adult tiger killing an adult female gharial in the 1990s, so it can happen, probably only for small females caught onland and unaware. This video is from a 2019 camera trap at the most isolated site we monitor gharial at, a beautiful downstream gorge just before the river flows to India. Here the Narayani is collected into a single very deep channel, where we sometimes see the last dolphin of the Narayani too. Tigers use these beaches as easy walking routes, on some days we see hundreds of tiger footprints from a few different tigers over a day of fieldwork. Nepal is really winning at tiger conservation, hopefully river conservation will follow the same trends in the future!
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