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ON THE EDGE OF EXTINCTION - D - THE LEOPARD (Panthera pardus)

United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
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( This post was last modified: 01-09-2020, 11:28 PM by BorneanTiger )

(12-30-2019, 09:24 AM)Styx38 Wrote: There seem to be some recent cases of Leopards killing humans, especially in India.


"Fatal encounter

November 27: Woman (45) killed in sugarcane field at Nawada village close to Nagina Dehat police station

December 17: Five-year-old Chetan of Prempuri village in Najibabad area killed and a child injured

December 19: Leopard mauls to death Chaman (23) at Alam Saray village

December 25: Shanu (16) falls prey to leopard attack at Asgarpur village

December 26: Shafiq killed by leopard



https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/meerut/farm-labourer-fifth-victim-of-leopard-attack/articleshow/72985690.cms






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Teenager mauled to death by a leopard in J-K's Kathua
      
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*This image is copyright of its original author

PTI, Jammu,

  • NOV 12 2019, 13:45PM IST
     
  • UPDATED: NOV 12 2019, 21:19PM IST


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Representative Image. (Reuters Photo).

"An 18-year-old boy was mauled to death by a leopard in Kathua district of Jammu and Kashmir, police said on Tuesday.
Paroshotam Kumar was attacked and killed by the wild animal while returning to his residence in Makwal village in Ramkote area late on Monday, a police official said.

He said the victim's mutilated body was recovered from the bushes and handed over to his family for last rites after completion of legal formalities.
The incident has caused panic among local residents who took to the streets on Tuesday morning along with the victim's body and blocked the main road to protest against the wildlife department.
Senior police and civil officers rushed to the area and were persuading the protesters to disperse, assuring necessary measures to prevent such an incident from occurring in the future, the official said.
The leopard remains untraced and is believed to have fled back into the forest, he said."


https://www.deccanherald.com/national/teenager-mauled-to-death-by-a-leopard-in-j-ks-kathua-775572.html



     

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Person killed by leopard in broad daylight in Karsog's Pangana Mandi News
Publish Date: Sat, 14 Dec 2019 04:17 PM (IST)A sheep leopard was killed in a leopard attack at Pangana in Karsog subdivision of Man Killed By Leopard District Mandi. This incident is being reported from Panayadu village in Pangana. ...




"Mandi, jnn. Sheep keeper was killed in a leopard attack at Pangana in Karsog subdivision of District Mandi. This incident is being reported from Panayadu village in Pangana. The person went towards the forest carrying the cattle, during which suddenly the leopard attacked him. It is being told that the person was alone at the time of the attack and the leopard bled him badly, Ram Singh resident Panayadu died on the spot.





Hearing the sound of shouting, people nearby and another man who brought cattle with him, reached the spot and rescued him from the clutches of the leopard, but by then he had died. The police and forest department team reached the spot and started investigating the case. Statements have also been taken in the case of local people."




https://www.jagran.com/himachal-pradesh/...43749.html

Albeit distressing, it's not too surprising, given that India is much more densely populated by humans than Africa. Both India and Africa have populations of over 1.3 billion, with the latter's population catching up with that of the former, but India's area is about 3.287 million km², whereas Africa's is about 30.37 million km², so imagine, with an area about one-tenth that of Africa, India has slightly more people! What that has meant for the Indian leopard is that urban areas have expanded, and natural habitats have diminished, forcing leopards to coexist with humans, even if that means preying on them or domestic livestock for survival, and likewise for other animals, including the tiger: https://blog.nationalgeographic.org/2016...icon-city/
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United States Lycaon Online
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French colonials with baby Atlas leopard in Algeria. 


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United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
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Jackpot, more image of Atlas leopards, and it may be that skins of Barbary and West African leopards were traded in Marrakesh in 2011: https://wildfact.com/forum/topic-african...#pid100708
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United States Lycaon Online
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( This post was last modified: 01-30-2020, 06:40 PM by Lycaon )

Stuffed barbary leopard at the Scientific institute of Rabat.


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Source https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:...orocco.jpg
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United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
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(01-30-2020, 06:39 PM)Lycaon Wrote: Stuffed barbary leopard at the Scientific institute of Rabat.


*This image is copyright of its original author


Source https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:...orocco.jpg

New thread for the Atlas or Barbary leopard: https://wildfact.com/forum/topic-atlas-o...#pid100833
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Belgium Luipaard Offline
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@peter Do you have further information regarding the two skulls?

Quote:I recently talked to a vet interested in skulls. He told me about 2 leopard skulls well exceeding 10 inches in greatest total length. I'll post about both skulls when I have the details (measurements and photographs).
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Netherlands peter Offline
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(03-06-2020, 12:44 PM)Luipaard Wrote: @peter Do you have further information regarding the two skulls?

Quote:I recently talked to a vet interested in skulls. He told me about 2 leopard skulls well exceeding 10 inches in greatest total length. I'll post about both skulls when I have the details (measurements and photographs).

Not yet.
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United States Lycaon Online
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@Pckts 

Wrong thread.
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United States Pckts Online
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(03-14-2020, 11:37 PM)Lycaon Wrote: @Pckts 

Wrong thread.

My bad, thanks Lycaon.
"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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United Kingdom Panthera10 Offline
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Phylogenetics, genome diversity and origin of modern leopard, Panthera pardus.

Abstract
Leopards, Panthera pardus, are widely distributed across southern Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. The extent and phylogeographic patterns of molecular genetic diversity were addressed in a survey of 77 leopards from known geographical locales representing 13 of the 27 classical trinomial subspecies. Phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequences (727 bp of NADH5 and control region) and 25 polymorphic microsatellite loci revealed abundant diversity that could be partitioned into a minimum of nine discrete populations, tentatively named here as revised subspecies: P. pardus pardus, P. p. nimr, P. p. saxicolor, P. p. fusca, P. p. kotiya, P. p. delacouri, P. p. japonensis, P. p. orientalis and P. p. melas. However, because of limited sampling of African populations, this may be an underestimate of modern phylogeographic population structure. Combined phylogeographic and population diversity estimates support an origin for modern leopard lineages 470,000-825,000 years ago in Africa followed by their migration into and across Asia more recently (170,000-300,000 years ago). Recent demographic reductions likely have led to genetic impoverishment in P. p. orientalis and in the island subspecies P. p. kotiya.

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/11479008_Phylogenetics_genome_diversity_and_origin_of_modern_leopard_Panthera_pardus
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United Kingdom Sully Offline
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Unsustainable anthropogenic mortality disrupts natal dispersal and promotes inbreeding in leopards

Abstract

Anthropogenic mortality of wildlife is typically inferred from measures of the absolute decline in population numbers. However, increasing evidence suggests that indirect demographic effects including changes to the age, sex, and social structure of populations, as well as the behavior of survivors, can profoundly impact population health and viability. Specifically, anthropogenic mortality of wildlife (especially when unsustainable) and fragmentation of the spatial distribution of individuals (home‐ranges) could disrupt natal dispersal mechanisms, with long‐term consequences to genetic structure, by compromising outbreeding behavior and gene flow. We investigate this threat in African leopards (Panthera pardus pardus), a polygynous felid with male‐biased natal dispersal. Using a combination of spatial (home‐range) and genetic (21 polymorphic microsatellites) data from 142 adult leopards, we contrast the structure of two South African populations with markedly different histories of anthropogenically linked mortality. Home‐range overlap, parentage assignment, and spatio‐genetic autocorrelation together show that historical exploitation of leopards in a recovering protected area has disrupted and reduced subadult male dispersal, thereby facilitating opportunistic male natal philopatry, with sons establishing territories closer to their mothers and sisters. The resultant kin‐clustering in males of this historically exploited population is comparable to that of females in a well‐protected reserve and has ultimately led to localized inbreeding. Our findings demonstrate novel evidence directly linking unsustainable anthropogenic mortality to inbreeding through disrupted dispersal in a large, solitary felid and expose the genetic consequences underlying this behavioral change. We therefore emphasize the importance of managing and mitigating the effects of unsustainable exploitation on local populations and increasing habitat fragmentation between contiguous protected areas by promoting in situ recovery and providing corridors of suitable habitat that maintain genetic connectivity.
"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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