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ON THE EDGE OF EXTINCTION - D - THE LEOPARD (Panthera pardus)

Norway Jubatus Offline
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#31
( This post was last modified: 06-04-2015, 03:03 AM by Jubatus )

Regarding size as some here has already stated: some huge Leopards from central western africa alongside the Persian leopard atleast before when there was alot more of them (etimated population today is 500-800 induviduals) is probably the biggest and heaviest, although @Pantherinae is not far of with his statements on leopards from south africa atleast from some places there are close to the top.
we have some huge males there, if it's ture as it seems, a male leopard there called ¨Vin diesel male¨ was weighed at over 90 kg's (I've heard 97 kg) no matter if he was gorged that's an insane weight for a leopard (when a leopard surpasses 70 kg, it starts to be a very impressive animal) and I would not be surprised if there are even bigger males in Krüger. 

with that said, huge leopardas can occur everywhere: Namibia, Botswana, Tanzania, India, Kenya and as discussed South Africa, but leopards I've seen from Gabon etc and Iran (looks to have gigantic chest girth) on pictures and what I've read abot those leopards skulls they would most likely be the biggest.
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India sanjay Offline
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#32

Got this wonderful image which represent  all nine extant subspecies of Leopards (Panthera Pardus.)

*This image is copyright of its original author

Credit to Roger Hall, Wildlife Art
 
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Lithuania makhulu Offline
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#33
( This post was last modified: 06-10-2015, 07:27 PM by tigerluver )

Sorry if not correct topic.

Leopard internal examination after being killed by porcupine. Quill thrusted leopard heart.






 

 
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United States Pckts Online
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#34
( This post was last modified: 09-18-2015, 12:33 AM by Pckts )

(09-15-2015, 04:57 AM)GuateGojira Wrote: The 2 first videos are incredible, showing that leopards, like all cats, can't recognize themselves in a mirror. As far I know, only chimpanzees, gorillas, orangutans, bottle-nose dolphins and orcas, are able to recognize themselves (I guess that elephants too).

On the issue of the mirror, I agree with @Pckts, it is too dangerous to use it with animals. Was the leopard injured after this? A cut with glass can be very serious.

Actually when Kevin Richardson did the Lion v Hyena: Intelligence test, the lions were able to realize it was a mirror and there was food behind it.

Apes seem to have the same reaction to mirrors that big cats do as well










I think its only natural, like when a puppy or kitten sees a mirror for the first time then they learn thats its just their reverse image.


Not trying to derail the topic, mods feel free to move if necessary.
Just thought it was relevant
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Guatemala GuateGojira Offline
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#35

No, it is great that you have post them, because I had saw only captive primates. I have not saw the reactions of wild specimens. Thanks @Pckts.

However, I most defend the gorilla this time, because it is known that a direct look at the eye is an act of aggression to them. So, in the experiment in captivity they used an indirect camera where the gorilla could see only his back, be even in that form, he managed to recognize itself.

I think that some animals, of the same species, had different reactions to others.
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United States Pckts Online
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#36

I think we know what happened next haha

"LEOPARD MATING & RIVAL MALE CHARGING ON THE COUPLE

Certainly the most rare Wildlife Moment I ever experienced and I doubt if I can see something else of this rarity and this standard till I die smile emoticon 1 hour of Leopard Mating, Fighting, territory marking and Roaring was out of the world experience — "


*This image is copyright of its original author
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United States Pckts Online
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#37

Cedit to Alexander Hamilton on the original find


"But the best sighting I have ever had happened in August last year. On the previous afternoon game drive ranger Nick Sims had found a male leopard in the northern parts of the reserve after the leopard had managed to kill a young giraffe! When I caught news of this event I thought he was joking because leopards surely don’t hunt giraffe, do they?
My curiosity got the better of me and we headed to the area the following morning. As we approached the area excitement was reaching boiling point! We could make out the shape of a predator in the distance and in that moment silence engulfed the vehicle… the closer we got we could soon tell that it wasn’t a leopard, but two hyenas feeding on a giraffe carcass. Everyone in the vehicle expected to see a leopard in the area so naturally they were quite disappointed. However, I told everyone that the leopard could still be somewhere around. We drove in a few concentric circles and sure enough, Euce managed to spot a massive male leopard sitting no more than 50 metres away from the kill. It was the Anderson Male. I had never seen this individual before and had only heard ell and about his size. To say I was in awe would probably be the understatement of the century. He is truly enormous! He looked fixedly at the hyenas with eyes wide open, possibly for an opportunity to regain his prize. The hyenas managed to dislodge a leg of the young giraffe and hastily made away with it. The leopard, without hesitation, ran towards the kill and swooped it up in one fluid motion. This caught the hyenas by surprise and they immediately dropped the leg they had been chewing on and charged back towards the carcass. The leopard dragged it at astonishing speed towards a nearby Cassia tree with the now trailing hyenas hot on his heels. He reached the trunk and without a second’s pause, hoisted it up in one seemingly effortless motion.While the carcass was being hoisted, one of the hyenas managed to grab hold of the back leg of the giraffe. This was the make or break moment for the leopard. It turned into a tug of war with the leopard up the tree and the hyena dangling in mid air hanging on to the giraffe’s leg. We could not believe what was transpiring in front of us. The hyena eventually conceded, falling back to the ground, and the exhausted leopard had claimed back the kill that he no doubt worked very hard for!We were left speechless by this raw display of brute strength. We watched the Anderson male for another couple of minutes before deciding to leave him with his hard-earned kill."
http://blog.londolozi.com/2016/04/the-best-sighting-ive-been-in/

Anderson Male

*This image is copyright of its original author



Alexander Hamilton "Tingana from the northern Sabi Sands next to a vehicle,a good picture that shows the size of a large male leopard compared to a group of people.Tingana is the 3rd biggest leopard in the Sabi Sands but much smaller than the Anderson male.'

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author
"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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United Kingdom Sully Offline
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#38

This happened in 2014, but still astounding!

Stranger than fiction
Advance science has no explanation for some of the mysteries of nature; only Almighty knows. Unprecedented strange relationships between a wild leopard and its prey-the cow observed in Antoli village in Vadodara district in Gujarat was one of such unbelievable mysteries.
*This image is copyright of its original author

 

The story begins in the summer, just after author’s joining duty in Vadodara Circle in June 2002. The leopard sightings were reported regularly from Antoli, a village about 20 km. away from Jambughoda Sanctuary and 40 km. from Vadodara city. In Antoli, a female leopard had chosen to litter in a sugarcane field, surviving on pigs, rodents, Indian hare, domestic dogs, birds, large frogs and the like, with the occasional goat thrown in for good measure. The irrigated agricultural fields had tall crops most of the times, providing adequate hides, linkages with nearby ravines, and easy movement of the big carnivores. As every part of the forest is heavily grazed, the leopardesses do not find safe hide and move in deeper part of sugar cane field for safety of their cubs. Infact, sugar cane fields contribute significantly for reproduction of the leopards. Sometimes leopardess moves far away from the forest boundary to select such field in the villages for littering.
By September 2002, the complaints began to pour in thick and fast. As a result, the forest officers decided to do something to address the problem of the villagers. People from Antoli village reported that a leopard with a cub was seen frequently in the evening and night. Such complains were normal in the region where man-animal conflict was common due to increase in the leopard’s population and absence of prey base in their habitats. In fragmented habitat or food scarce area, the leopard shift location and move away from original habitat to nearby area for some period to harvest food available in particular season. In such a situation, the Department avoided capturing the harmless animals. When complains reached the Forest Minister at Gandhinagar, the author was asked by the minister, Daulat Singh Desai to look into the matter. After consulting the Chief Wildlife Warden, it was decided to capture the animal from the area. The trap cage with a live bait was arranged at a suitable site by the staff. First photo record with video was recorded by Manoj Thaker, a naturalist from Vadodara. The range forest officer, forester, Rohit Vyas, Honorary Wildlife Warden, Manoj Thakar, nature lovers from Vadodara and their friends spent several nights in the village and trapped the female leopard successfully at about 2 O’clock at night on 20th September 2002, and released it into a nearby forest in the early morning.

*This image is copyright of its original author

The villagers witnessed trapping of the leopard and had a great relief but were unhappy as they lost an important guest with whom they had developed an intimacy. Also, the leopard was economical to them as they had a high crop yield because the cat’s presence in the village would protect damage of crop at night from jackals and wild boars.
 
A month later the complaints began to pour in again. The villagers believed that the leopard caught was probably the mother of a young leopard that roamed the area. When the forest staff and wild lifers visited the village, they came across a story so strange that the author refused to believe it at first. The village was dominated by Patel, an upper caste community, and lower caste inhabited at the fringe of the settlement, as normally found in the Indian villages. A family belonging to backward caste lived in the fringe of habitation with a cow, a buffalo calf and two bullocks. The animals in the open field in front of the house had open access from agricultural fields from three sides. The elder of the family, about sixty years old, observed a leopard coming near the cow every night where both had a fearless interaction. He doubted first day but was surprised to see their behaviour next day. When he narrated the event, no body believed his story. Subsequently, people witnessed an unnatural drama everyday.
The author was told about this story by the Range Forest Officer and Rohit Vyas but did not believe till he witnessed the drama on 17th October. The old man narrated interesting observation that every night the leopard would draw near to a particular cow, which has body colour similar to leopard, in an open field in the front of his house. The two animals would approach each other at very close proximity and seemed to all intents and purposes to be interacting, without any aggression on the part of the leopard, or fear on part of the cow.
The cat and its bovine friend ‘met’ and, exactly as the villagers had stated, seemed totally at ease with each other. There were two bulls and a buffalo calf in the field, which were pointedly ignored by the leopard but they were not at ease as the cow.
 
The story of the unlikely friendship spread like wildfire and people from other villages started coming to witness the phenomenon. The roof of a nearby pucca house was the best vantage point to witness the two strange friends. People said they could approach the two from a distance of less than 10 m, provided no camera flashes were set off. The wildlife lovers and photographers routinely began visiting the village, photographs were taken and the matter reported dutifully to forest officials.

*This image is copyright of its original author

A leading English daily even published the story on the front page, borrowing its headline from the title of a Hindi popular film, Ek chhoti si love story! (A small love story). But everyone was not quite comfortable with this situation. The elders in the village did not fear the cat, but worried that it might harm a child in the event of an encounter after dark. They did not want it harmed, but certainly wanted it taken away. People in Delhi also started asking their reporters about the news but full truth was never published, except in an article written by the author in the Sanctuary Asia magazine published from Mumbai. A team of a news channel passed a whole night to film the drama but the cat did not give any opportunity. The village became famous; people had no fear from the leopard. Several people, including the Chief Wildlife Warden, Pradeep Khanna visited the village and witnessed the strange behavior during this period; the Forest Department decided to trap it by arranging cages in the village.
Just when the story had attracted so much attention, the leopard disappeared for about a week. When it returned though, naturalists were on hand to document the relationship on film. Every night, normally between 9.30 p.m. and 11.00 p.m., the leopard would approach the cow from the surrounding fields. The cow would usually raise its ears before the cat’s arrival, seemingly detecting its presence from a distance. Village dogs too would bark to announce the leopard’s imminent arrival. And when it did arrive, the cat would first observe the surroundings from a distance, then move closer to the cow, rub the body with the cow and gently sit near it. At times it could be heard making a low gurgling sound that was difficult to describe, but certainly seemed submissive in nature. The two animals would often butt each other playfully with their heads. Once the cow seemed annoyed and actually pushed the leopard hard with its horns. At this the leopard merely moved closer and resumed its gurgling!
 
The cow would sometimes lick the cat on its head and neck. Indeed, to many observers, it seemed that the cow was behaving towards the leopard as she would towards her own calf. On occasion the leopard, its suspicious nature still on display, would find excitable humans, including photographers, uncomfortable and it would slink into the shelter of the fields. All night vigils revealed that five to six trips a night were normal and on one particular night she returned as many as a dozen times.
 
The author spent a few nights to enjoy these strange things happening there. One night, he reached Antoli at nine o’clock along with Rohit Vyas, Manoj Thaker, Tadvi (RFO) and other people. He fixed his camera in a hut where an old man slept. His chair in the hut was at about 10 metres away from the spot where the cow was sitting. The cow was young with a good height and reddish brown in color with a white belly. Barring black spots on the leopard, the color of the cow was not much different from the big cat. The author waited in the hut for over an hour and the old man started snoring while having a sound sleep. The man had observed the behaviour of the leopard for about two months time and knew every thing. He said before sleeping that the leopard normally comes at about 10 o’clock but some times earlier also. The electric supply went off when we occupied over position. After some time, there was some disturbance and we saw the leopard just sitting beside cow when torch was flashed. The leopard moved away in darkness. The light was flashed in the direction which was normally opted by the leopard for arrival. The author saw the big cat sitting on heap of paddy grass. Out of two bulls, one was tied between cow and paddy heap where leopard sat comfortably. The behaviour of the bull was different. It remained standing, attentive and breathing heavily looking at the leopard. The big cat just ignored the attentive action of the bull which kept on standing in a tense mood. For the bull, the leopard was unwanted and dangerous, although it was not as violent as a bull would normally become in the presence of a leopard. Perhaps, after observing behaviour of the two friends, the bull had less fear. The cow kept on sitting fearlessly; the leopard again came close to the cow, rubbed the body with her and sat beside it just like a calf normally sits close to her mother. The author came out from the hut and went on the roof to see both the drama. At night at about 2 O’ clock it was decided to return to Vadodara when the leopard disappeared in the darkness. In the next visit of the Chief Wildlife Warden, the events were photographed.
After a few days, the two photographers had developed a perfect understanding about the arrival of the leopard. Sensing the presence of human beings, sometimes a crowd of over three dozen, the cat coolly moved close to the cow. Many times they played with their heads and then sat close to each other. It is very difficult to explain the communication between them in words. The cow received the big cat like her calf that had come near the mother to get affection. The leopard sat close to the cow, sometimes joining her body and sometime below the mouth and neck of the cow. In most of the cases it was like a sub adult cat sitting with mother. Sometime, the leopard used foot to get cow in standing position. After passing some time, the animal used to disappear in the field in the darkness, perhaps due to the disturbance of the photographers but came back after some time. The relationship between the leopard and the cow grew which was never observed or reported in the past. Many time both played with their heads. The cow licked leopard several times, sometimes very heavily covering entire head and neck.
 
During the observation from November to January, the staff employed two cages at strategic locations with baits inside. Because of the strange behaviour of the leopard, goat, dog, puppy, hen and even meat were tried as baits but leopard did not enter the cage to kill the animals, although it inspected moving around the cages. The mission of capturing the leopard did not yield any result. It was finally decided to capture the animal using a tranquilizing gun but the animal stopped coming to the site before the plan was operationalized. In the meantime, I again visited the site with the Chief Wildlife Warden (CWW) on 2nd December and stayed there over the night to see the drama but the leopard did not visit the spot. One day before the visit, people of the village had a cultural programme with drums and songs at the site at night. Probably this event disturbed the leopard as visits were not regular after the disturbance. I observed the behaviour closely again with the CWW on 31st January. On 20th December the leopard injured a goat in the cage from outside. In December and January, people reported that plenty of puppies disappeared at regular intervals from villages as winter was a season for abundant new born dog pups. God knows, it might be a harvest season for our leopard.
 
With observers now almost permanently positioned, we came to learn that the leopard visited the cow continuously from October 8 to 22 and then from November 4 to 29. For some reason, between November 30 and December 29, the leopard stayed away. But it was seen in the vicinity. Then in the third week of January, the leopard seemed to vanish but visited again in the last week of February and stayed with the cow till early morning. Attempts to capture it in November and December proved futile, the wary animal steadfastly refusing to enter cages set out with baits, though it once tried to kill a goat from outside the cage. After over a week of regular visit, the cat again disappeared in February but returned for one or two  days in first week of March. Reports from villagers indicate that the animal also visited neighbouring villages to procure food, mainly dogs.
 
Nature lovers maintained contact with the villagers to collect fresh information. But the leopard did not return to the cow for reasons not known to anybody. Few months passed but nothing was heard, except  indirect evidences of the leopard visiting the village occasionally. People believed that two leopards occasionally visited the village in 2004 but it was difficult to say whether one of them was the same leopard. Once a leopard killed a cow in the village and ate partly. Perhaps it had become a mature large cat and got a mate somewhere, but nothing could be confirmed.
 
So what is this all about? How come a predator and prey behaved in this incredible way? There have been many varying interpretations for the strange behavior. Some suggest the female leopard captured in August was the mother of the sub-adult female we had observed, though from the photographs, she does seem fully grown.

*This image is copyright of its original author

We know least about the habit and behaviour of these animals; even we are not fully aware about some of the mysterious behaviour of human beings. I could not understand why the leopard regularly met the cow and behaved in a manner which was not believed by people. It was more surprising to me that why a cow accepted its enemy and loved like she loved her calves. The author believes the young leopard may have been affected by the absence of its own and somehow detected some maternal qualities in the cow, which would have reassured her and helped her cope without her own mother.
 
P.M. Lad, ex Chief Wildlife Warden of Madhya Pradesh, who had spent his entire life with tigers and leopards, was surprised to know the fact. His wife had kept a tiger cub at her residence which became an adult from there. Lad again explained the view of his wife that the cow was probably imprinted on the young leopard at a very early age, prior to its hunting instincts having emerged and matured. This may have led to the unusual relationship, since the cow too perceived no threat at all. It is likely that the cow had never encountered a leopard before and did not therefore ‘know’ that the two were meant to be sworn enemies.
 
No one will ever perhaps be able to state with confidence, just what the truth was, but it is clear that the behaviour of both cow and leopard was strange and downright unbelievable. And then of course this is India! People more knowledgeable than forest officers and field biologists insist that the two animals had shared a close relationship in their previous births. Some priests hinted at a supernatural relationship. But nature is not telling us anything. Nature is full of surprises; there may be some missing link and we know little about it. Who knows about the truth? But such an unbelievable and unprecedented event was worth while to mention in this article/blog for future benefits of the people.
"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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Italy Ngala Offline
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#39
( This post was last modified: 06-08-2016, 10:58 PM by Ngala )

Indochinese Leopard (Panthera pardus delacouri), taken with camera trap, in Mondulkiri Protected Forest, Cambodia. Credits to WWF Cambodia.

*This image is copyright of its original author
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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United Kingdom Sully Offline
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#40

Rare Javan leopards captured in stunning camera-trap photos
May 22, 2013 By David Strege
 
*This image is copyright of its original author

   
Thirty cameras were placed throughout the Gunung Halimun Salak National Park in West Java, Indonesia, to capture wildlife scenes in the rainforest. The camera traps sat for one month before researcher Age Kridalaksana of the Center for International Forestry Research finally collected them.
What he discovered when retrieving the images were stunning photos of the rare and critically endangered Javan leopards. One leopard acted as if it knew right where to lie down and get photographed. Kridalaksana shared the vivid and brilliant photos in this Vimeo video. Enjoy:



The photos in the video show the leopard resting, grooming, yawning, and rolling around. Another camera caught a leopard just passing by.
According to Wired Science, Kridalaksana captured thousands of images of deer, civets, and birds, along with the rare photos of two spotted leopards and one black leopard.
“The Javan leopard population is believed to comprise fewer than 250 adults, with deforestation, human conflicts, and a declining prey base among major threats to the population,” wrote Nadia Drake of Wired Science. “Since leopards normally have a territory spanning several square miles, seeing three in one area is unusual.”
Javan leopards have been classified as critically endangered since 2008 by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. They are confined to the island of Java, the world’s 13th largest island in the world, located in Indonesia.
No doubt their beauty is striking.
Photo is a screen grab from the video
"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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United States Blackleopard Offline
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#41

Do you guys have any of the weight and measurement data of leopards compared to Mountain lions, I believe the cougars are bigger, but I'm of the impression the leopard would have a stronger bite-force, not sure?
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Argentina Tshokwane Offline
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#42

(09-01-2016, 08:50 AM)Blackleopard Wrote: Do you guys have any of the weight and measurement data of leopards compared to Mountain lions, I believe the cougars are bigger, but I'm of the impression the leopard would have a stronger bite-force, not sure?

Hello Blackleopard.

Right now I don't have measurements to compare the two, but if I find some data on this I will post it here as a response.

Welcome to the forum.
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United States Pckts Online
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( This post was last modified: 09-02-2016, 01:48 AM by Pckts )

(09-01-2016, 08:50 AM)Blackleopard Wrote: Do you guys have any of the weight and measurement data of leopards compared to Mountain lions, I believe the cougars are bigger, but I'm of the impression the leopard would have a stronger bite-force, not sure?

There is significant overlap. Basically an extra large leopard is 85-100kg which is similar to an extra large cougar. A leopard will have a larger skull, more robust chest and neck and POSSIBLY limbs (but this is still debated and I haven't been able to find much on either limbs girth) where a cougar is much more leggy. "Longer limbs and possibly more robust"
I think on average they are too close to say one is larger than the other.
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United States Blackleopard Offline
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#44

Ok thanks guys, yeah I was having a discussion about this, and was not sure which was bigger the Puma or the Leopard, I was thinking though, the leopard looks to have a larger head.  Would be interesting to see if there is any data revealing this.  There does seem to be some big cougars out there, but for whatever reason, it just seems like for their size, the cougars have pretty small heads for a bigcat.  I was sort of arguing for the leopard being the stronger, and thinking it would win, but this guy was posting stuff showing puma's slaying bears, and I was like, what!!!!   Had no idea cougars were that tough, so now I'm not sure, I still think the leopard should be tougher, but again, I guess the cougar's do face some pretty tough competition with the bears.
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Netherlands peter Offline
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#45
( This post was last modified: 09-04-2016, 07:14 PM by peter )

1 - THE RELATION BETWEEN SIZE AND AGE IN KWAZULU-NATAL LEOPARDS


The table below clearly shows the differences between young adult males (4-6 years of age) and mature males (7 years and older). It also shows Kwazulu-Natal leopards, with mature males averaging about 160 pounds and almost 7.2 in total length (measured in a straight line), are large animals: 


*This image is copyright of its original author


This is a Zululand male leopard:


*This image is copyright of its original author



2 - REGION AND SIZE

Leopards in southwestern Asia are small, but Iran leopards, not that far away, most probably top the list for total length and greatest skull length. This male, recently poached, is both long and big-skulled:


*This image is copyright of its original author


There is a strong relation between size and region, but it isn't clear why that is. Although most large leopards are seen in regions without lions and tigers (central and western parts of central Africa, Shri Lanka, Iran and some parts of southern Africa), Indian leopards, facing lions in Gir and tigers in most other parts of India, are by no means small animals. Same for Kwazulu-Natal leopards.


3 - PUMAS AND LEOPARDS

Although not sure about the averages of both cats at the level of species, the largest subspecies of both probably just about compare in most respects. Patagonian pumas could top the list for total length, but large leopard subspecies have a longer and more robust skull and compare in weight. One could say leopards, although slightly shorter, are a bit more robust and be close, but the margins are limited.

Not so in skulls. Reasons unknown, but leopard skulls, although smaller, compare to lion and tiger skulls for structure. Lions, tigers, jaguars and leopards are big cats, whereas pumas top the department of small cats. Skulls of large pumas only very seldom exceed 9 inches in greatest total length, whereas skulls of large male leopards often exceed 10 and even 11 inches. Puma and cheeta skulls are not that different. To roar or not, that is the question. Pumas scream, whereas leopards roar, or more accurately, saw.

When seeing both close to each other, the difference is striking. Pumas have shorter and smaller skulls, but they often are as tall and long or better. The longest I saw was a Patagonian female. She almost compared to the lioness nextdoor. Although leopards ooze strength and athleticism, pumas are not lacking in these departments.

The major difference between both is in behaviour. Although pumas attack and consume humans at times, they are beginners compared to leopards. The old male feasting on pilgrims in northern India a century ago had collected at least 125 scalps when he was shot by Jim Corbett. Compared to the Panar male leopard, who most probably exceeded 400 (...), he was a very modest eater of human beings. Trainers and keepers consider leopards as dangerous. Pumas, more withdrawn, only rarely cause problems. 

I'm not saying pumas don't stand a chance in an encounter. When talking to a trainer, I saw a Javan male leopard approach a Montana female puma. The Javan, by no means a small animal, only heard the blows he received. She was as fast as they come and the Javan male was even more surprised than those who watched the exchange. Based on what I saw, I'd say pumas seem a bit faster and more athletic. In strength, the difference seems to be very limited.

Robustness is important in an encounter, but only after a threshold is exceeded. Male jaguars exceeding, say, 180 pounds are very different from a leopard or puma of similar weight. They can lose a fight, but not their life. Not so the other way round. The reason is robustness, as it affects the ability to withstand damage.

Jaguar skulls often are more robust and heavier than leopard skulls of similar length. Skulls of large males not seldom exceed 1 kg. in weight, which is never seen in leopard skulls. If a jaguar gets a hold, he's able to deliver significant damage. If a leopard gets a hold, chances are the jaguar survives. Jaguars are skull biters, whereas leopards are neck or, more often, throat biters. When you try to throttle an animal participating in big neck competitions, this is not a good idea. 

He's a large jaguar. Watch the size of the neck:



*This image is copyright of its original author
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Welcome to WILDFACT forum, a website that focuses on sharing the joy that wildlife has on offer. We welcome all wildlife lovers to join us in sharing that joy. As a member you can share your research, knowledge and experience on animals with the community.
wildfact.com is intended to serve as an online resource for wildlife lovers of all skill levels from beginners to professionals and from all fields that belong to wildlife anyhow. Our focus area is wild animals from all over world. Content generated here will help showcase the work of wildlife experts and lovers to the world. We believe by the help of your informative article and content we will succeed to educate the world, how these beautiful animals are important to survival of all man kind.
Many thanks for visiting wildfact.com. We hope you will keep visiting wildfact regularly and will refer other members who have passion for wildlife.

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