There is a world somewhere between reality and fiction. Although ignored by many, it is very real and so are those living in it. This forum is about the natural world. Here, wild animals will be heard and respected. The forum offers a glimpse into an unknown world as well as a room with a view on the present and the future. Anyone able to speak on behalf of those living in the emerald forest and the deep blue sea is invited to join.
--- Peter Broekhuijsen ---

  • 3 Vote(s) - 4 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
ON THE EDGE OF EXTINCTION - D - THE LEOPARD (Panthera pardus)

Norway Pantherinae Offline
Bigcat Enthusiast
*****
#16

amazing fotage two male leopards killing a large warthog together! they where actually rivals and just worked together bringing it down afterwards the marthly male took the kill an ran off eith it. enjoy this 




5 users Like Pantherinae's post
Reply

United States Pckts Online
Bigcat Enthusiast
******
#17

Amazing footage, it seems like more of competition for the prey item than cooperative killing like you see in lions. The first leopard seemed to have it in control and the other just "butted in" then they seem to play a game of tug a war to see who gets the carcass.

Great vid either way, tfs.
1 user Likes Pckts's post
Reply

United States Pckts Online
Bigcat Enthusiast
******
#18

Thomas RajanSanctuary Asia Follow · March 8 · Edited ·    
Honey I forgot to wish a Happy International Women's Day
Be a bold Leopardess......
Masai Mara


*This image is copyright of its original author

Rare to see male and female together in a tree.
 
2 users Like Pckts's post
Reply

United States Pckts Online
Bigcat Enthusiast
******
#19
( This post was last modified: 04-07-2015, 10:51 PM by Pckts )

Interesting, because I just read that India leopard #'s are down 80%, let me look around and see if I can find the article.

The person who posted it wrote something that stuck with me...

Kirti Ranjan Nayak‎Sanctuary Asia
Yesterday at 1:19am ·

"Running after tigers, I guess we forgot about the leopards. Leopards number down to 80%. Wondering if it's true!!"
 
1 user Likes Pckts's post
Reply

United States Pckts Online
Bigcat Enthusiast
******
#20

Here it is, hopefully india follows suit and protects their leopard the way the amurs are being protected now

DEHRADUN: Trashing speculation following the spate of recent incidents of human-leopard conflict which indicated that leopard numbers were on the rise, a study conducted by three wildlife scientists has found that the leopard population, on the contrary, has declined by a whopping 70-80 per cent over the past 100 years. The study, conducted over four years by Samrat Mondal of the Wildlife Institute of India (WII), Krithi K Karanth of the Wildlife Conservation Society, and Uma Rama Krishnan of the National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS), has been sent to wildlife journals for review.

Talking to TOI, Mondal said that the study was primarily based on genetic data analysis. "The population estimation of leopards has been done in different parts of the country but no cumulative data is available. We collected molecular data from fecal samples of leopards, and took into account depletion of their habitat as well as prey range over the past 100-odd years. When we analyzed the data, we found an almost 70-80 % decrease in the prevalence of leopards."

In India, leopard conservation is often clubbed with tigers because many leopards are in tiger reserves. But because a reliable count of their numbers is not available, not much has been done for their systematic protection. "Tigers have got protection under the Project Tiger program, following which poachers have now started replacing tiger body parts with those of leopards. Around 4,000 body parts and bones of leopards were recovered in the period 1994-2013 compared to 1,000 body parts of tigers," said Mondal.
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/home/...mpaign=TOI
 
1 user Likes Pckts's post
Reply

United States Pckts Online
Bigcat Enthusiast
******
#21


*This image is copyright of its original author
 Golden HeartSanctuary Asia6 hrs · A five-year-old male leopard was run over and killed by an unidentified vehicle on the Kozhikode-Mysore National Highway 212 inside the Wayanad Wildlife Sanctuary (WWS) at Muthanga on the Kerala-Karnataka Border, Indiahttp://www.thehindu.com/…/leopard-run-ov…/article7072114.ece
Reply

India sanjay Offline
Wildanimal Enthusiast
*****
#22

In a recent video leopard attacked villagers from Indore in India. Leopard targeted an old man, but he faces him bravely with a thick stick.



1 user Likes sanjay's post
Reply

United States Pckts Online
Bigcat Enthusiast
******
#23

Doesn't look like the leopard is targeting any one so much as defending it self. I see a man beating a stick at it then it charges, I'm sure there is more to the story than this....


My opinion is, after the leopard makes the charge it doesn't follow through, the man is down and it still doesn't follow through, when I see predation it usually is swift and meant to be attacked towards the vulnerable spots, not like this.
What do you think?
1 user Likes Pckts's post
Reply

Norway Pantherinae Offline
Bigcat Enthusiast
*****
#24
( This post was last modified: 05-13-2015, 05:47 AM by Pantherinae )

Incredible to see the difference between the smallest leopard (female Arabian leopard) and the one considered the biggest (South African male leopard )
*This image is copyright of its original author
 
*This image is copyright of its original author


 
2 users Like Pantherinae's post
Reply

Australia Richardrli Offline
Wildanimal Enthusiast
**
#25

The top picture is a Cape leopard, not Arabian. Also, Cape leopards can get up to 50kg, so they're not all small.
1 user Likes Richardrli's post
Reply

India sanjay Offline
Wildanimal Enthusiast
*****
#26

Thanks for update Richard, I am interested to know from which corner of the world Leopard are biggest. According to a recent documentary on Sri Lanka it is said that Leopard from Sri Lanka are biggest when compared to other and the reason they gave is that Sri Lankan Leopards are top predator on the Island and the prey is also relatively bigger when compared to other area where Leopard are top cat.

So what is right ?
1 user Likes sanjay's post
Reply

Australia Richardrli Offline
Wildanimal Enthusiast
**
#27

Sri Lankan leopards are big, but definitely not the biggest. The largest skulls have come from Iran and the forests of equatorial Africa, and photos of Persian leopards and forest dwelling leopards of that part of Africa have showed truly massive beasts. The consensus is that these two are the biggest among leopards.
5 users Like Richardrli's post
Reply

Netherlands peter Offline
Expert & Researcher
*****
Moderators
#28
( This post was last modified: 05-13-2015, 10:05 AM by peter )

Leopard skulls show more sexual dimorphism than all other roaring cats. Jaguars are at the other end. The largest and most robust skulls I saw were from central and western parts of Africa, but leopards shot in regions not that far away were among the smallest. The regional differences seem to be much more pronounced than in other big cats. One reason could be there are way more leopards than lions or tigers. The smallest I saw were shot in Eritrea, whereas Java skulls were larger and more robust than I thought. Skulls of Indian leopards also often are quite large.

Leopards living in productive regions without their larger relatives usually are large, with males often easily exceeding 140 pounds. The heaviest males top 200 pounds, but animals of that size are as scarce as 600-pound tigers. I read quite a lot about the interaction between leopards and chimps and leopards and gorillas. Very interesting. Anyone with access to good sources is invited to post original reports.
4 users Like peter's post
Reply

United States Pckts Online
Bigcat Enthusiast
******
#29

(05-13-2015, 05:45 AM)'Pantherinae' Wrote: Incredible to see the difference between the smallest leopard (female Arabian leopard) and the one considered the biggest (South African male leopard )
*This image is copyright of its original author
 
*This image is copyright of its original author


 

 

Especially when they hold the kill like this, it makes them seem far large than they are, it really stretches their spines out and puts them in front of the person which makes them appear larger.

*This image is copyright of its original author

 
2 users Like Pckts's post
Reply

Guatemala GuateGojira Offline
Expert & Researcher
*****
#30
( This post was last modified: 05-16-2015, 10:56 AM by GuateGojira )

Jajajajaja, excelent point Pckts.

Most modern (and some old) hunters exaggerate they pictures. By the way, how tall is that man? The woman in the picture is much taller than him.

The largest leopards, independently of the area (Africa, India or Iran), measured between 130 to 140 cm in head-body with some exceptional males up to c.160 cm, measured correctly between pegs/straight line and not over curves. There is a figure of 191 cm quoted by Nowak (1999) but that is simply ridiculous. Imagine an animal of the size of a male lion but weighing only 90kg??? It is simply stupid. [img]images/smilies/dodgy.gif[/img]

The guy in the picture is very short and I can't rule out the possibility that they could use Photoshop in the image.
 
4 users Like GuateGojira's post
Reply






Users browsing this thread:
1 Guest(s)

About Us
Go Social     Subscribe  

Welcome to WILDFACT forum, a website that focuses on sharing the joy that wildlife has on offer. We welcome all wildlife lovers to join us in sharing that joy. As a member you can share your research, knowledge and experience on animals with the community.
wildfact.com is intended to serve as an online resource for wildlife lovers of all skill levels from beginners to professionals and from all fields that belong to wildlife anyhow. Our focus area is wild animals from all over world. Content generated here will help showcase the work of wildlife experts and lovers to the world. We believe by the help of your informative article and content we will succeed to educate the world, how these beautiful animals are important to survival of all man kind.
Many thanks for visiting wildfact.com. We hope you will keep visiting wildfact regularly and will refer other members who have passion for wildlife.

Forum software by © MyBB