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ON THE EDGE OF EXTINCTION - B - THE LION (Panthera leo)

Netherlands peter Offline
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#61

Big skull of a male lion, Grizzly. I would be very interested to talk to the taxidermist. I knew a guy from Japan, but he returned some years ago and the contact was lost. I might try to contact the Japanese community in Amsterdam.
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United States tigerluver Offline
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#62

Driscoll et al. (2015) just published a new study on modern lion genetics, finding "four clusters: 1) West/Central Africa, 2)East Africa, 3) Southern Africa and 4) India. This is not in line with the current taxonomy, as defined by the IUCN, which only recognizes an African and an Asiatic subspecies". See attached.

Attached Files
.pdf   lionphylogeny2015.pdf (Size: 1.52 MB / Downloads: 23)
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Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
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#63

Primarily, there are two major clades for the Afro-Asiatic lion group, the northern one (Asiatic-Barbary-West/Central Africa) and the southern one (South/East Africa).
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Guatemala GuateGojira Online
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#64

Wow, very interesting.

Let me read it first, I am going to comment latter. Happy
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United States tigerluver Offline
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#65

DEVELOPMENTAL EFFECTS OF CLIMATE ON THE LION'S MANE (PANTHERA LEO) - See attached

Main points:
- Mane development reacts more to cold than heat.
- 50% of mane variation is due to climate in captive specimens. 
-The lack of manes in Pleistocene lions can be seen as a reason for speciation due to the contradiction with the first point.

Attached Files
.pdf   lionmanedevelopment.pdf (Size: 777.8 KB / Downloads: 25)
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United States TheLioness Offline
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#66

I guess this is the best place to put his, not sure if was seen before, just saw it today.

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United States Pckts Offline
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#67

Can you post the study?
I don't even know which lions and tigers were measured by Dr. Colin. R McHenry?

The only 272kg+ tiger skull they could use is Madla and I'm not even sure which skull they could use for a 272kg plus lion?
I'm also curious as the the difference he choose between the low estimate and high estimate.

TFS
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Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
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#68
( This post was last modified: 12-16-2015, 11:37 PM by GrizzlyClaws )

It was based on the skulls from the past records.

And I am not sure if the 432 mm lion skull is still considered eligible. Maybe shall we acquire more opinion from Guate?
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United States Pckts Offline
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#69

Which skull did they use for the 275kg+ tiger do you know?
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Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
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#70

Mostly based on the estimation from the skulls.

These skulls were belong to the record from the unknown individuals.
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Guatemala GuateGojira Online
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#71
( This post was last modified: 12-16-2015, 11:50 PM by GuateGojira )

I don't think that those large skulls were actually measured, but just gathered from literature. Longest skulls measured by scientists are of 383 mm and 408 mm, for tiger and lion respectively. The figure of 420 mm for lion came from a hunting record (although accepted by Hemmer).

We need the document for more details.
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Canada Dr Panthera Offline
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#72

(12-05-2015, 09:12 AM)tigerluver Wrote: Driscoll et al. (2015) just published a new study on modern lion genetics, finding "four clusters: 1) West/Central Africa, 2)East Africa, 3) Southern Africa and 4) India. This is not in line with the current taxonomy, as defined by the IUCN, which only recognizes an African and an Asiatic subspecies". See attached.

Excellent study, while the genetic distance is minimal among all four clusters, securing subspecies status for the Indian lions and the West/Central African lions will help with according them additional conservation measures by classifying them endangered versus vulnerable and so on
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Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
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#73
( This post was last modified: 12-24-2015, 05:37 AM by GrizzlyClaws )

(12-24-2015, 04:42 AM)Dr Panthera Wrote:
(12-05-2015, 09:12 AM)tigerluver Wrote: Driscoll et al. (2015) just published a new study on modern lion genetics, finding "four clusters: 1) West/Central Africa, 2)East Africa, 3) Southern Africa and 4) India. This is not in line with the current taxonomy, as defined by the IUCN, which only recognizes an African and an Asiatic subspecies". See attached.

Excellent study, while the genetic distance is minimal among all four clusters, securing subspecies status for the Indian lions and the West/Central African lions will help with according them additional conservation measures by classifying them endangered versus vulnerable and so on

The Indian lions also evolved from the West African lions, there is almost no doubt about it.

I think we are pretty close to the origin of the mythical European lions, and they were likely derived from another group of the West African lions that spread to Europe in the late Pleistocene.
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Greece LionKiss Offline
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#74

a relatively old video about the diminishing lion population in Africa.

do we have statistics about the numbers now?





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India sanjay Offline
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#75

We do not have any real figure, But I think approx 30,000 lions left
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