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Crocodile and Big cats Interaction

United States chaos Offline
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#46

(10-17-2018, 07:00 PM)chaos Wrote:
(10-17-2018, 06:50 PM)Shadow Wrote: I made a picture to compare in rough way. Here in photo is replica of Lolong, a crocodile 6m 17cm long. And there is a tiger from above, I scaled tiger as relatively big, from nose to back about 2 meters without tail.

Tiger is not in straight position and I tried to pay attention to it. But this hopefully gives a little bit perspective to it, that what kind of sizes we are talking about with biggest known crocs. And also, that what is crocodile torso size and head size there. Red lines are meters, blue lines feet. I made those pictures just for personal curiosity.

6m 17 cm is 20,24 feet btw.

Crocs of 3+ meters are more than any big cat can handle. On land, a very difficult task, in the water - a mismatch.
Just my opinion.

Excuse me, my bad. I meant 5+ meters
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India sanjay Offline
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#47

I am not sure, If this is posted earlier.. I saw this video today which was posted in 2007. A filmed interaction of Tiger and Crocodile. Though both seems to be smaller and younger.




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Finland Shadow Offline
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#48

(10-21-2018, 11:30 AM)sanjay Wrote: I am not sure, If this is posted earlier.. I saw this video today which was posted in 2007. A filmed interaction of Tiger and Crocodile. Though both seems to be smaller and younger.




Interesting video. Croc was small, but maybe because of that also very fast. And this croc did that rolling, what we see them doing in water. In other videos and photos tigers have been on back of crocodiles practically making them unable to defend when tail and mouth are useless. Maybe this tiger learned a lesson here and in future avoided crocodiles or understood, that when hunting, there is no room to be sloppy/overconfident :) Young animals do time to time big mistakes and many pay heavy price.
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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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#49
( This post was last modified: 10-21-2018, 10:57 PM by epaiva )


*This image is copyright of its original author
Big Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus) with Leopard it captured
https://www.facebook.com/latestsightings...on_generic[/video]
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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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#50
( This post was last modified: 10-22-2018, 06:52 PM by epaiva )

This is an image of a Lioness on the banks of the Mara river fighting over a Zebra the Lioness killed. It's mine no it's mine, taken by Linda Skeen in aid of Mara Elephant Project while staying at Mara Serena Serena Hotels, it does not specify how everything ended.

*This image is copyright of its original author
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Malaysia johnny rex Offline
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#51

(10-22-2018, 06:47 PM)epaiva Wrote: This is an image of a Lioness on the banks of the Mara river fighting over a Zebra the Lioness killed. It's mine no it's mine, taken by Linda Skeen in aid of Mara Elephant Project while staying at Mara Serena Serena Hotels, it does not specify how everything ended.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Look at that size differences.
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Canada Kingtheropod Offline
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#52

This is something I never saw before

Leopard hanging out with crocodiles...




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Canada Kingtheropod Offline
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#53
( This post was last modified: 11-06-2018, 01:50 AM by Kingtheropod )

(10-22-2018, 06:47 PM)epaiva Wrote: This is an image of a Lioness on the banks of the Mara river fighting over a Zebra the Lioness killed. It's mine no it's mine, taken by Linda Skeen in aid of Mara Elephant Project while staying at Mara Serena Serena Hotels, it does not specify how everything ended.

*This image is copyright of its original author
That looks like a Deinosuchus!

That crocodiles tail is bigger then that lioness.

XD
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#54

@Kingtheropod :

About #52: completely crazy to see this leopard feasting with several big Nile crocs, great find !
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United States Pckts Offline
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#55

Not a big cat but I didn't want to start a new thread just for this..

Ashit Choudhary
Size does not matter.

Otters are known for their notorious behaviour of how they challange their opponents.

Smooth coated otters pulling crocodile tail to save their territory.



August 2018
Chambal River, Kota, Rajasthan

*This image is copyright of its original author
"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
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United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
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#56

(10-18-2018, 11:50 AM)Spalea Wrote: More exclusively about interactions between Nile crocs and lions and other animals into the water:






Here we can see, or guess, the second lion plunging for helping its fellow... The solidarity between the two cats worked.

Have you heard of the Bumi lions of Zimbabwe? https://www.earthtouchnews.com/natural-w...-zimbabwe/



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United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
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#57
( This post was last modified: 07-06-2019, 10:53 PM by BorneanTiger )

(10-18-2018, 10:06 AM)Spalea Wrote: On that subject, remember Gustav, the famous Nile croc !

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gustave_(crocodile)










There is one anomaly in the story of Gustave that I'd like to mention, about him spitting out the remains of humans as if he was like a Great White shark that mistook a human for a seal, again and again. If all these accounts of a croc spitting out the remains of a victim all belong to one croc, rather than a group of crocs that mistook humans for other creatures, then why would Gustave keep on mistaking humans for other creatures, or why would Gustave just kill a human only to spit it out repeatedly?



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United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
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#58

(10-18-2018, 11:50 AM)Spalea Wrote: More exclusively about interactions between Nile crocs and lions and other animals into the water:






Here we can see, or guess, the second lion plunging for helping its fellow... The solidarity between the two cats worked.

The mouth of this Nile croc would have been long enough to eat Masai lion Fang's face, but instead, Fang managed to scare a whole bunch of crocs that his pride couldn't, even going into the water to confront them: 



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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#59

@BorneanTiger :

About #56: very interesting account ! It's always amazing to see lions becoming specialist crocs hunter or another big preys ( buffalos, elephants, giraffes and so on)... Lions are opportunist and one day they can they can tell themselves that a sleeping croc on land would be an easy prey. And thus to developp a tactic to catch and kill them. After all, on land, for two lions acting together, catching an adult croc requires much less energy than an antelope or zebra, especially during the hot day.
Lions being social big cats, compared to other felids have perhaps more abilities to change their habits of hunting.
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United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
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#60
( This post was last modified: 07-07-2019, 11:49 PM by BorneanTiger )

(10-18-2018, 07:33 PM)chaos Wrote:
(10-17-2018, 07:00 PM)chaos Wrote:
(10-17-2018, 06:50 PM)Shadow Wrote: I made a picture to compare in rough way. Here in photo is replica of Lolong, a crocodile 6m 17cm long. And there is a tiger from above, I scaled tiger as relatively big, from nose to back about 2 meters without tail.

Tiger is not in straight position and I tried to pay attention to it. But this hopefully gives a little bit perspective to it, that what kind of sizes we are talking about with biggest known crocs. And also, that what is crocodile torso size and head size there. Red lines are meters, blue lines feet. I made those pictures just for personal curiosity.

6m 17 cm is 20,24 feet btw.

Crocs of 3+ meters are more than any big cat can handle. On land, a very difficult task, in the water - a mismatch.
Just my opinion.

Excuse me, my bad. I meant 5+ meters

I found something interesting. Back in 2011, a Sundarban tigress aged 8-10 years was killed after a night-long fight with a 14-foot (about 4.2 m) croc. The report (https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/home...548432.cms) doesn't say if it was a mugger or saltwater croc, but I know that 14 ft is rather long for a mugger, though not impossible (https://archive.org/details/journalofbom...b/page/296), so more likely this was a SW croc. If it took a 14-ft croc a whole night to defeat a small Sundarban tigress, then I dare say that even the likes of Lolong better not underestimate the fighting capabilities of a huge tiger or lion, such as this Bengal tiger at Kaziranga National Park in India (https://www.123rf.com/photo_16298381_ben...71k3_4yzjc) or this Southern lion at Etosha National Park in Namibia (https://www.wildlifeadventures.com/namib...mibia.html): 

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author
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