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United States Pckts Offline
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Here is B3 psuedo mating with B2 to show dominance.

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"Among the three brothers B3 is the biggest followed by B1 and then B2. Here is a rare picture of B3 pseudo mating with B2 to show his dominance, B3 is in the top and B2 is in the bottom. We also can see B3 is bigger too. B3 finally got electrocuted by poachers and died on November 2003"

B3's skull certainly looks a little bigger as well.
 
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Sri Lanka Apollo Offline
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(07-01-2014, 01:29 AM)'Pckts' Wrote: Who challenged Charger and caused those wonds on him, from the documentory?
Thanks for the clarification btw, apollo.

Ustaad is most dominate tiger in Ranthambhore, correct?
Fetah is Ranthambhore as well, right, he is also a very dominate cat.

 



B2 was the one who challenged Charger and caused all those wounds.
But Charger didnt die because of the wounds in a cave as shown in the documentary

In June 2000, Charger was engaged in a conflict with strong B2 tiger. In this decisive battle with B2 Tiger, in which B2 wrote the last deciding page of Charger’s grand saga. A week later, Charger was found half dead, lying in a ditch close to Mardari village. To avoid any controversies and danger to villagers, the forest department drove the Charger into a cage and put him inside a chain-link enclosure at Chirhadhar. A veterinary doctor attended his wounds and Charger seemed to improve in health. Since then Charger remained in enclosure. Charger was often seen walking along the fence as he wished to roam independently in to the area once ruled by him. He felt loneliness and uncomfortable in enclosure as he spent most of the time of his life in a royal style by ruling the jungle where he was now reduced to a enclosure. It was ungrateful day of 29th September, 2000, when Charger passed away leaving his name in history.



Regarding T24 after reaching adulthood, he took residence in Chidi Kho valley of Sawai Mansingh Sanctuary, just south of the National Park.
When T12, the dominant male of the Sultanpur area was relocated to Sariska on July 2010, T24 immediately occupied his territory. It was also said that T24 killed the cubs of T13 after occupying the territory because the cubs were sired by T12.
Sultanpur (T24) was well-known and famos because he resides in one of the Ranthambhore’s finest and most visited landscapes – the southern part of the park below the hill fort. So T24 is one of the dominant male tigers from Ranthambore Park and he is the dominant resident male in Sultanpur area which is a tourism zone and hence he is very famous.



Regarding (T42) or Fateh, is one to avoid if you are faint-hearted. An aggressive male, he is prone to charging both vehicles and people. In fact he is famous for charging a Forest Department vehicle for up to two kilometres !
T42 is now (thankfully) residing outside the key tourism zone.
T42 now lives in Kuwalji area, he took over this territory from the resident male T36 by killing it.

Here is a video of T42 chasing the vehicle for 2 kms




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United States Pckts Offline
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I love that vid of him chasing the jeep for quite a while. He is saying, move it or die! Big ole head on him aswell.
TFS
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Sri Lanka Apollo Offline
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Name             : T23 = Indala Male
Location        : Ranthambore National Park
Year of Birth : 2008
Ancestry       : Son of Jhumroo(T-20) and Lahpur-Nagditigress (T-22), Brother of T24 and T25
Status           : Live
Sex                : Male
Species          : panthera tigris tigris
 
Indala, one of three male cubs born to Lahpur-Nagdi tigress T22 and father Jhumaroo (T20), is a direct descendent of the park’s matriarch, Machali. He quickly established himself as the dominant male among his brothers T24 and T25.
 
The Indala community, after which this male was named, was originally a village of 34 families that has recently relocated to new homes outside the park. Young Indala quickly moved into the area. Quick to exert his authority over this newly restored area, he is now outside of the visitor zone and is seen far less often than his other two brothers Dollar (T25) and Sultanpur (T24). He can be very illusive but has only just recently been spotted in Nagdi.
 
In 2011 camera traps revelaed he had a dangerous bullet wound, yet with help from the Forest Department he has bounced back to health living between Phuta Kot and Guda.




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India sanjay Offline
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Great Tiger and good narration, TFS Apollo
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Sri Lanka Apollo Offline
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(06-30-2014, 11:08 AM)'Apollo' Wrote: Name               : T-12=Guda Male
Location           : Ranthambore National Park Moved to Sariska Tiger Reserve
Year of Birth    : 2004
Ancestry           : Son of T15 tigress and X male, Brother of T21
Status               : Unknown
Sex                   : Male
Species             : panthera tigris tigris


T12 male is the last surviving member of the Guda clan. He was the dominant resident male of the Sultanpur area but later on July 2010 T12 was translocated to Sariska. After the translocation his whereabouts are unknown. During his stay in Ranthambore he mated with T13 and sired T38 and T39. His second litter went missing after his relocation. I think he weighed in at 221Kg, I hope @GuateGojira can help us on the weight part.




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Hi guys,
I checked out the docs and found out that T12 actually weighed in at 170Kg during the translocation and not 221Kg.
It was T10 that weighed in at 221Kg.
Hope it helps
 
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United States Pckts Offline
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T42 - Rarely seen and highly temperamental tiger…found him to be huge!

Zone 9, Qualji Eco Tourism Zone!
The habitat was very harsh but, the King of the jungle knows how to survive! He had eaten a Blue Bull Antelope the evening/night before and now barely moved! More images to follow later!

Ranthambhore National Park
Nikon D800 + Nikkor 200-400mm VR II
36.3 MP Full Frame Images (sometimes, he looked too close for comfort when he stared right back)— with Nafees Mohammed and 4 others.

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*This image is copyright of its original author



Star and Ustad along with T 25 and T 3 are now the four dominant males within the national park. Undoubtably. Two of my favourite males from Ranthambhore National Park - Star and Ustad along with T 25 and T 3 are now the four dominant males within the national park. Undoubtably.

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United States Pckts Offline
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Munna

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Here is Munna, He certainly looks to be a Massive tiger though.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HEU_sewg1JI
"Currently one of the dominant male tigers of Kanha National Park is a tiger named Munna. Munna is famous for his large size, big head and has symbol "CAT" written on his head."

Wow, check this vid out. Start watching at 1:19
Munna is definitely a big boy and this is from June 14'
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0QL7oLZ1px0


Munna - Large male from Kanha Tiger Reserve

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*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author

 
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Sri Lanka Apollo Offline
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( This post was last modified: 07-03-2014, 05:48 AM by Apollo )

(07-03-2014, 04:47 AM)'Pckts' Wrote: Munna - Large male from Kanha Tiger Reserve

*This image is copyright of its original author





 

 


This is not Munna, it is the Huge male Naak Kata.
Naak Kata is one of the biggest males in Kanha, bigger than Munna.

Naak kata and Munna had several territorial battles between them.


Here are a couple of pics of Naak kata


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United States tigerluver Offline
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Does anyone know the cause of death of Madla? I remember Hairyfoot feel into a well, but just can't remember what happened to Madla.
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Netherlands peter Offline
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( This post was last modified: 07-03-2014, 04:56 PM by peter )

(07-03-2014, 03:09 PM)'tigerluver' Wrote: Does anyone know the cause of death of Madla? I remember Hairyfoot feel into a well, but just can't remember what happened to Madla.


 

Not long after the documentary was broadcasted, nearly all resident tigers were poached. It was more or less announced, as one of the tigresses who featured in the documentary was poached when the filmcrew was there. This, most unfortunately, is the fate of quite many tigers in India and other countries.

Documentaries have two sides. One is they are of interest for millions in countries where big predators are gone. The flipside is poachers watch documentaries as well.

It isn't expensive to get to these tigers, as rangers are underpaid. You remember the documentary on a young male tiger called 'Broken Tail'? He was killed by a fast train when he moved out of the reserve trying to establish a territory. A BBC-team tried to find out what happened when he was found dead. They interviewed a man mentioned by many as one who had poached tigers. He admitted he had killed tigers to feed his family. They paid him $100 for every tiger, he said. He was probably lying, but I don't doubt the amount he made was very limited. In a world where many barely survive, anything is possible. And it will be cheap. 

In the days of AVA, I got mails of people like us from countries that still have big cats. Quite many, I'd say. They offered absolutely reliable info about tigers, but asked me not to write about it. This is the reason.
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India sanjay Offline
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Yes, This is 100% correct poachers are a step ahead. Even information shared by wildlife century, photographers or from any publications on internet, magazine about tigers or lion or rhino, is well used by poachers.
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United States Pckts Offline
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Not only are poachers a step ahead, they also have better weapons as well. A lot of times, these rangers are pretty much fighting a war against these poachers and they don't have the proper training or weapons to deal with it. How the gov't doesn't allocate a national army unit for wild life protection is beyond me.
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Sri Lanka Apollo Offline
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( This post was last modified: 07-04-2014, 11:38 PM by Apollo )

Name             : BM6 = Baghin Nalla
Location        : Pench National Park
Year of Birth : October 2005
Ancestry       : Daughter of Charger male and Badi Maa female
Status           : Live
Sex                : Female
Species          : panthera tigris tigris
 
Born to her mother Badi Maa in October 2005 and overseen by her father, the aggressive dominant male of the area, appropriately named Charger. Together with her sister, the famous Collared Tigress, and two brothers she grew up under the spotlight of the wildlife ‘Big Brother’ TV programme, as the four cubs of the ‘Spy in the Jungle’ series, which was to be such a huge hit around the world in 2008.
  
With the fame came the visitors, eager to see them as youngsters, and it’s not surprising that soon both here and her sister, like their mother, were quick to use these admirers and their transport to their advantage. As a family they were seen hunting their favourite meals stalking behind this human induced cover - and the results were almost always in their favour.
 
Soon after her sister was radio collared, they split up as a family and Baghin took over a part of the Eastern side of her mother’s territory. It is believed she had a single cub soon after in mid 2008, but it died at a young age.
 
By December 2009 Baghin had given birth to another set of what is believed to have been three cubs, though two were only ever confirmed, a male (BN2) and a female (BN3) cub. She was seen only occasionally, preferring the peace and quiet of the eastern part of the park, but was known to enjoy travelling outside the park and eating cattle or buffalo, much to the consternation of the Forest staff. Both her two youngsters grew to adulthood but their whereabouts are now unknown.


Less than two years since she last gave birth, in November 2011, Baghin had given birth to her third litter of three cubs, two sons (BN5 & BN6) and a daughter (BN7), near the Junewani road, which was under the control of the father, BMW. (MW1)
 
In August 2013, Baghin again gave birth to what is beleived to be four cubs in a fourth litter, under the protection of their father BMW.





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Sri Lanka Apollo Offline
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Name             : T18 = Athara = Bachhi Lakrda = Baghani tigress = ST2
Location        : Born in Ranthambore National Park and relocated to Sariska Tiger Reserve
Year of Birth : October 2006
Ancestry       : Daughter of X male (T2) and Machali (T16) tigress
Status            : Live
Sex                : Female
Species          : panthera tigris tigris
 

Satara, Athara and Unnis were born during the 2006 monsoon months to tigress Machali and Ranthambhore's dominant male T2. Machali's cubs from her previous litter, Bahadur and Sharmelee, were still living within her territory and hadn't separated from their mother. After giving birth to her new litter, Machali became intolerant of Sharmelee and would chase her away whenever she found her close to the younger cubs.
 
Sharmelee eventually took over Lakkarda – once part of Machali's territory – and rarely returned to her mother and the new litter. Bahadur stayed with Machali and the new cubs for a few months and then drifted off to establish his own territory. At first, Machali kept the cubs between the lakes and Nalghati and rarely ventured out of this area. The territory boasts a high density of sambar deer on which the cubs were raised.
 
On reaching maturity Satara tigress was the most dominant among the litter. Satara challenged Machali and took over most of her territory and chased off Athara and Unnis. Athara and Unnis then started fighting over the remainder of the territory not claimed by their more dominant sister Sundari (Satara). Athara first established herself in Jhalara and Nalghati. When the dominant tigress in the adjoining territory died, she finally got the opportunity to expand her range.

Finally Athara (T18) was shifted to Sariska Tiger Reserve, she was air lifted. During the capture T18 was 3 years old and weighed in at 170Kg. Definitely a very large tigress indeed. I would guess she could have added another 20 to 30Kg when she reached 5 years. T18 was named Baghani after a village inside Sariska tiger Reserve
 
Here is a latest video of T18, look at her massive size.








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