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Skulls, Skeletons, Canines & Claws

Finland Shadow Online
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(01-01-2019, 06:06 AM)epaiva Wrote:
(12-27-2018, 02:05 AM)GrizzlyClaws Wrote:
(12-27-2018, 02:00 AM)Shadow Wrote:
(12-27-2018, 01:51 AM)GrizzlyClaws Wrote: The big bear claws compared to big tiger claws.

The bear claw is obviously longer, and the tiger claw looks broader with more part being embedded into the bone sheath, hence it was accustomed to be retractable.

BTW, I've only seen the North American Grizzly bears with claws frequently exceeding 10 cm, sometimes up to 11-12 cm, whereas the Russian Brown bears' claws rarely exceeded 10 cm.



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What comes to bear claws. I think, that longest claws are from Alaskan coastal area(?). There are the biggest bears after all and only comparable bears what comes to size can be found from Kamchatka peninsula, Russia. Other Russian brown bears are more or less comparable with for instance Yellowstone brown bears and other inland populations, like our brown bears in Finland.


Alaskan Brown bear ~ 12 cm
Russian Brown bear ~ 10 cm
Amur tiger ~ 8.5 cm
Bengal tiger ~ 7.2 cm
African lion ~ 6.9 cm

These are the largest instances encountered from my personal experience, maybe there could have been even more outliers, but these are some rare cases for their respective species.
Happy New Year to you @GrizzlyClaws and to you @Shadow hope 2019 will be a very good one for both
Same to you too!
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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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( This post was last modified: 01-05-2019, 12:23 AM by epaiva )

Liger upper fang
Credit to @oddarticulations

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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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( This post was last modified: 01-10-2019, 09:17 AM by epaiva )

Tigon skull and fangs, skull measures 13 inches long and 9 inches wide, they did not specify measurements of the fangs.
Credit to @oddarticulations

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Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
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( This post was last modified: 01-10-2019, 11:09 AM by GrizzlyClaws )

The liger upper canine tooth looks around 65 mm from the gum line based on the total length of 129 mm.

The tigon skull from the post #1548 looks quite odd but interesting, the canine teeth look very jaguar-like.
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Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
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( This post was last modified: 01-11-2019, 03:44 AM by GrizzlyClaws )

@Smilodon-Rex

Here is a good example of analogy in case if you are interested, where we got a liger skull that measured 410 mm x 308 mm, with an extracted upper canine tooth of 129 mm.

You can also take a look about how the canine teeth were embedded into the skull.



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Credit to @oddarticulations
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Malaysia johnny rex Offline
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Are canines the size indicator of how big a panthera's skull is?
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Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
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(01-10-2019, 10:25 PM)johnny rex Wrote: Are canines the size indicator of how big a panthera's skull is?

More or less, I think the large canine teeth are still mostly positively correlated with the large skulls.

It is hard to imagine how a large canine tooth can be embedded into a smallish skull.
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China Smilodon-Rex Offline
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(01-10-2019, 09:16 PM)GrizzlyClaws Wrote: @Smilodon-Rex

Here is a good example of analogy in case if you are interested, where we got a liger skull that measured 410 mm x 308 mm, with an extracted upper canine tooth of 129 mm.

You can also take a look about how the canine teeth were embedded into the skull.



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*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



Credit to @oddarticulations
 410 mm X 308 mm means volume of this skull ? the upper canine looks so thick when compare with human's hand
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Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
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(01-11-2019, 08:25 PM)Smilodon-Rex Wrote:
(01-10-2019, 09:16 PM)GrizzlyClaws Wrote: @Smilodon-Rex

Here is a good example of analogy in case if you are interested, where we got a liger skull that measured 410 mm x 308 mm, with an extracted upper canine tooth of 129 mm.

You can also take a look about how the canine teeth were embedded into the skull.



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



Credit to @oddarticulations
 410 mm X 308 mm means volume of this skull ? the upper canine looks so thick when compare with human's hand

It stands for length x width.
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China Smilodon-Rex Offline
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(01-11-2019, 08:41 PM)GrizzlyClaws Wrote:
(01-11-2019, 08:25 PM)Smilodon-Rex Wrote:
(01-10-2019, 09:16 PM)GrizzlyClaws Wrote: @Smilodon-Rex

Here is a good example of analogy in case if you are interested, where we got a liger skull that measured 410 mm x 308 mm, with an extracted upper canine tooth of 129 mm.

You can also take a look about how the canine teeth were embedded into the skull.



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



Credit to @oddarticulations
 410 mm X 308 mm means volume of this skull ? the upper canine looks so thick when compare with human's hand

It stands for length x width.
  Well, if 304 mm is a real width of this skull, I believe that prehistoric manless lion would more wider than this number
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Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
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@Smilodon-Rex

Replica wise, here is a comparison between a 17.5 inches liger skull replica and a 19 inches Panthera Atrox one.

The upper canine teeth from that liger model is about 5.5 inches, and Panthera atrox model got the similar canine teeth, just being more robust.

1 inch = 2.54 cm



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Japan Betty Offline
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(12-24-2018, 10:51 AM)GrizzlyClaws Wrote: Amur tiger



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Lower teeth, this length is rare... 
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Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
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(01-13-2019, 10:27 PM)Betty Wrote:
(12-24-2018, 10:51 AM)GrizzlyClaws Wrote: Amur tiger



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Lower teeth, this length is rare... 

Then the upper canine teeth were probably up to 155 mm in length, and 40 mm in diameter.
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Singapore tigeramulet Offline
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Its really fascinating to see all the fossils! Thank you all for sharing.
Just wondering, if I ever want to learn about fossils where do I start?
I don't even get to touch a tooth or a skull.
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Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
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(01-17-2019, 03:07 PM)tigeramulet Wrote: Its really fascinating to see all the fossils! Thank you all for sharing.
Just wondering, if I ever want to learn about fossils where do I start?
I don't even get to touch a tooth or a skull.

First find a local zoo in your area, then ask them zookeepers if they have any skull or canine teeth preserved from the deceased animals.
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