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Predation of Adult Rhino By Kaziranga Tigers: WII Expert Rabin Sharma’s Documentation

India Ashutosh Offline
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#31

Of course it was Kzt 085. At this point is anyone surprised at Kzt 085 anymore?! Isn’t he the one that killed Kzt023 (who I still believe is one of the largest tigers I have seen on a camera trap)?
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Finland Shadow Offline
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#32
( This post was last modified: 11-19-2019, 02:42 AM by Shadow )

(11-19-2019, 12:44 AM)Pckts Wrote:
(11-19-2019, 12:11 AM)Shadow Wrote:
(11-18-2019, 11:11 PM)Pckts Wrote:
(11-18-2019, 11:17 AM)Shadow Wrote: One more photo concerning that 600 kg (estimated by Sharma) calf carcass. This photo shows in more clear way eaten part of it.


*This image is copyright of its original author
Big animal, definitely not what I'd consider to be a calf but certainly not full grown either.
Also like Rishi said, very rare for Tigers to start with the front, usually they prefer the rump but with a Rhino it may not matter.

Photos of this calf are good examples how perspective can make same carcass to look like small and big depending about is, that is object or animal used to comparison in front or behind.

Big carcass:

*This image is copyright of its original author


Small carcass:

*This image is copyright of its original author


Big carcass:

*This image is copyright of its original author


Those photos are the reason why I trust mostly to it, what Sharma say, 600 kg heavy and that means a calf about 1 years old or a bit older. Nice prey and a lot of eat for a tiger.

There is a big difference between a Tiger and Human being, of course a carcass will look smaller in front of a Tiger compared to a human and it never looked small to me even with the Tiger in front of the Carcass and the People behind the carcass. 
That's a big animal, a 600kg animal with that much meat removed (estimated) is huge, it's as large as most Buffalo bulls and if you've ever seen a Cape buffalo, you know they are big animals. 
In regards to it's age, I'm not sure if it's a year or a couple of years, since I assume the only thing you're going off of was the post about a 600kg Rhino in captivity celebrating it's first bday, but I've already posted a few animals that are being weighed and you can see just how large a 200kg Rhino is, something that is 3-4 times their size will most likely need more time to grow into it. 
Here you can see a one year old Rhino estimated to be 857lbs or 388kg 

"Baby White Rhino "Sawyer" Turns 1!

Rhinoceros baby celebrates his birthday with rhino sized treats

Natural Bridge, VA – August 24th – It's been one year since the Virginia Safari Park welcomed its first baby white rhinoceros, a monumental birth for a critically endangered species. The healthy baby boy was born after a 16-month pregnancy to “Samira” a 6 year-old female. Baby Sawyer weighed about 100 pounds at birth and has gained weight steadily. His zookeepers estimate he weighs roughly 875 pounds today, which is still relatively small compared to the weights of adult females like his mother, Samira, who weigh roughly 3,000 to 4,000 pounds and adult males that can weigh up to 5,000 pounds."
http://www.virginiasafaripark.com/News/TabId/226/ArtMID/1002/ArticleID/26/Baby-White-Rhino-Sawyer-Turns-1.aspx

and here is another one year old in the 800lb area

"February 7 calls for celebration--at least at Cleveland's Metropolitan Zoo. 

The Zoo is celebrating the first birthday of baby rhino Lulu. 

Gaining 850 pounds in one year, the zoo says Lulu is thriving. "

In honor of Lulu's special day and throwback Thursday, the zoo posted photos from her first mud bath.

https://www.wkyc.com/article/news/local/cleveland/happy-birthday-rhino-at-cleveland-zoo-turns-1-year-old/95-c9301406-5a65-4198-b3f3-6244f5103a08#:~:targetText=February%207%20calls%20for%20celebration,from%20her%20first%20mud%20bath.

And this is a 1 year old Wild Rhino




My guess would be that Rhino is older than 1 for sure, it's a large animal.
Especially if it's mother was no longer with it, it most certainly was older than that.

This is very simple actually, here were posted two cases concerning adult rhinos and one was a calf because too small to be something else if we trust Sharma and his weight estimation.

Why calf?

"The calf stays with its mother for about two to three years. Male calves tend to leave their mother sooner than their female counterparts."
https://www.rhinosinfo.com/rhino-birth-and-care-of-the-young.html

"At around 3 years old, the calf will set out on its own. A rhino can live up to 45 years."
https://www.livescience.com/27439-rhinos.html

 "Calves live with their mothers for several years. Females are full-grown at 6½ years and males at about 10 years. Rhinos reach sexual maturity at six to eight years of age."
http://www.torontozoo.com/animals/Greater%20one-horned%20rhinoceros

"Maternal calves: a calf drinks on average 20-30 litres of milk per day and grows by 1-2 kg daily. They start nibbling and feeding on roughage at the age of 3-5 months, but may continue to suck up to the age of 20 months. Young calves are also vulnerable to the predation of tigers in the wild"
https://www.savetherhino.org/rhino-info/rhino-species/greater-one-horned-rhino/

"The calves were rescued in Kaziranga National Park (NP) when they were about one to five months old when they were swept away by flood waters. The calves were hand reared and nursed at the Centre for Wildlife Rehabilitation and Conservation (CWRC) with the aim of releasing them into their natural habitat. They were fed human milk formula until they reached two years of age, and then with concentrates and greens in paddocks in CWRC. At the age of about three years the calves were translocated to Manas NP, about 500 km away from Kaziranga and placed in a pre-release area measuring 600 acres."
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/287892702_Rehabilitation_of_greater_one-horned_rhinoceros_calves_in_Manas_National_Park_a_World_Heritage_Site_in_India

I think, that we can safely use the word calf in this case when we look how professional sources define that word when talking about rhinos.

And why mother not with a calf in Kaziranga...

" Flooding is the major cause of displacement of rhino calves in Kaziranga NP. In a few cases, calves were found alone in the forest for unknown reasons; a few were orphans after poachers killed their mothers, others were failed predation attempts. CRWC took in all these rhinos for treatment and care."
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/287892702_Rehabilitation_of_greater_one-horned_rhinoceros_calves_in_Manas_National_Park_a_World_Heritage_Site_in_India

Debates are ok, but what comes to definition of rhino calf, time to end it. Also it should be clear, that calves do get separated from their mothers and that makes them very vulnerable. Where a 600-800 kg buffalos or gaurs are formidable opponents, same sized rhino calf is... just a kid. When alone.... lost, scared and confused, there is nothing to debate in these things.

Only thing is, that does someone want to question weight estimation of Sharma and by that say, that this third case was adult rhino too. I see there a carcass with only some flesh missing from neck area. It looks like a good time to focus to cases with adult rhinos.
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United States Pckts Offline
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#33
( This post was last modified: 11-19-2019, 03:21 AM by Pckts )

(11-19-2019, 02:05 AM)Shadow Wrote:
(11-19-2019, 12:44 AM)Pckts Wrote:
(11-19-2019, 12:11 AM)Shadow Wrote:
(11-18-2019, 11:11 PM)Pckts Wrote:
(11-18-2019, 11:17 AM)Shadow Wrote: One more photo concerning that 600 kg (estimated by Sharma) calf carcass. This photo shows in more clear way eaten part of it.


*This image is copyright of its original author
Big animal, definitely not what I'd consider to be a calf but certainly not full grown either.
Also like Rishi said, very rare for Tigers to start with the front, usually they prefer the rump but with a Rhino it may not matter.

Photos of this calf are good examples how perspective can make same carcass to look like small and big depending about is, that is object or animal used to comparison in front or behind.

Big carcass:

*This image is copyright of its original author


Small carcass:

*This image is copyright of its original author


Big carcass:

*This image is copyright of its original author


Those photos are the reason why I trust mostly to it, what Sharma say, 600 kg heavy and that means a calf about 1 years old or a bit older. Nice prey and a lot of eat for a tiger.

There is a big difference between a Tiger and Human being, of course a carcass will look smaller in front of a Tiger compared to a human and it never looked small to me even with the Tiger in front of the Carcass and the People behind the carcass. 
That's a big animal, a 600kg animal with that much meat removed (estimated) is huge, it's as large as most Buffalo bulls and if you've ever seen a Cape buffalo, you know they are big animals. 
In regards to it's age, I'm not sure if it's a year or a couple of years, since I assume the only thing you're going off of was the post about a 600kg Rhino in captivity celebrating it's first bday, but I've already posted a few animals that are being weighed and you can see just how large a 200kg Rhino is, something that is 3-4 times their size will most likely need more time to grow into it. 
Here you can see a one year old Rhino estimated to be 857lbs or 388kg 

"Baby White Rhino "Sawyer" Turns 1!

Rhinoceros baby celebrates his birthday with rhino sized treats

Natural Bridge, VA – August 24th – It's been one year since the Virginia Safari Park welcomed its first baby white rhinoceros, a monumental birth for a critically endangered species. The healthy baby boy was born after a 16-month pregnancy to “Samira” a 6 year-old female. Baby Sawyer weighed about 100 pounds at birth and has gained weight steadily. His zookeepers estimate he weighs roughly 875 pounds today, which is still relatively small compared to the weights of adult females like his mother, Samira, who weigh roughly 3,000 to 4,000 pounds and adult males that can weigh up to 5,000 pounds."
http://www.virginiasafaripark.com/News/TabId/226/ArtMID/1002/ArticleID/26/Baby-White-Rhino-Sawyer-Turns-1.aspx

and here is another one year old in the 800lb area

"February 7 calls for celebration--at least at Cleveland's Metropolitan Zoo. 

The Zoo is celebrating the first birthday of baby rhino Lulu. 

Gaining 850 pounds in one year, the zoo says Lulu is thriving. "

In honor of Lulu's special day and throwback Thursday, the zoo posted photos from her first mud bath.

https://www.wkyc.com/article/news/local/cleveland/happy-birthday-rhino-at-cleveland-zoo-turns-1-year-old/95-c9301406-5a65-4198-b3f3-6244f5103a08#:~:targetText=February%207%20calls%20for%20celebration,from%20her%20first%20mud%20bath.

And this is a 1 year old Wild Rhino




My guess would be that Rhino is older than 1 for sure, it's a large animal.
Especially if it's mother was no longer with it, it most certainly was older than that.

This is very simple actually, here were posted two cases concerning adult rhinos and one was a calf because too small to be something else if we trust Sharma and his weight estimation.

Why calf?

"The calf stays with its mother for about two to three years. Male calves tend to leave their mother sooner than their female counterparts."
https://www.rhinosinfo.com/rhino-birth-and-care-of-the-young.html

"At around 3 years old, the calf will set out on its own. A rhino can live up to 45 years."
https://www.livescience.com/27439-rhinos.html

 "Calves live with their mothers for several years. Females are full-grown at 6½ years and males at about 10 years. Rhinos reach sexual maturity at six to eight years of age."
http://www.torontozoo.com/animals/Greater%20one-horned%20rhinoceros

"Maternal calves: a calf drinks on average 20-30 litres of milk per day and grows by 1-2 kg daily. They start nibbling and feeding on roughage at the age of 3-5 months, but may continue to suck up to the age of 20 months. Young calves are also vulnerable to the predation of tigers in the wild"
https://www.savetherhino.org/rhino-info/rhino-species/greater-one-horned-rhino/

"The calves were rescued in Kaziranga National Park (NP) when they were about one to five months old when they were swept away by flood waters. The calves were hand reared and nursed at the Centre for Wildlife Rehabilitation and Conservation (CWRC) with the aim of releasing them into their natural habitat. They were fed human milk formula until they reached two years of age, and then with concentrates and greens in paddocks in CWRC. At the age of about three years the calves were translocated to Manas NP, about 500 km away from Kaziranga and placed in a pre-release area measuring 600 acres."
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/287892702_Rehabilitation_of_greater_one-horned_rhinoceros_calves_in_Manas_National_Park_a_World_Heritage_Site_in_India

I think, that we can safely use the word calf in this case when we look how professional sources define that word when talking about rhinos.

And why mother not with a calf in Kaziranga...

" Flooding is the major cause of displacement of rhino calves in Kaziranga NP. In a few cases, calves were found alone in the forest for unknown reasons; a few were orphans after poachers killed their mothers, others were failed predation attempts. CRWC took in all these rhinos for treatment and care."
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/287892702_Rehabilitation_of_greater_one-horned_rhinoceros_calves_in_Manas_National_Park_a_World_Heritage_Site_in_India

Debates are ok, but what comes to definition of rhino calf, time to end it. Also it should be clear, that calves do get separated from their mothers and that makes them very vulnerable. Where a 600-800 kg buffalos or gaurs are formidable opponents, same sized rhino calf is... just a kid. When alone.... lost, scared and confused, there is nothing to debate in these things.

Only thing is, that does someone want to question weight estimation of Sharma and by that say, that this third case was adult rhino too. I see there a carcass with only some flesh missing from neck area. It looks like a good time to focus to cases with adult rhinos.

Let's not jump to assumptions on why the Rhino was alone, we don't know if the mother was poached or flooding was involved or the if the Rhino was actually on it's own because of naturally leaving it's mother like they do around 2-3 Years old.
Considering that Rhino was large and alone, your definition of Calf doesn't necessarily apply, in professional sources Rhinos being 800lbs tend to be 1 year old, that is less than half the size of this Rhino killed, so I would think the term Sub Adult fits nicely. 

"The sub-adults at this age have just left their mothers and are still relatively small."
http://www.blackrhinohusbandry.org/field...behaviour/

Just like big cats, Sub Adults aren't fully grown nor are they cubs, but yet they still are with their mothers or they are on their own. The age cut off is subjective, but when one thinks of "cub or calf" they think of an animal dependent on it's mother to survive, this is most likely not the case with this Rhino.


Lastly is that I'm not comparing the Danger of a 700kg Rhino to a 700kg Buffalo but if you think that a Rhino of that size isn't formidable, you'd be mistaken. You can see examples of this with Elephant Calves and youngsters fighting off entire Lion Prides.
"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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Finland Shadow Offline
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Moderators
#34

(11-19-2019, 03:13 AM)Pckts Wrote:
(11-19-2019, 02:05 AM)Shadow Wrote:
(11-19-2019, 12:44 AM)Pckts Wrote:
(11-19-2019, 12:11 AM)Shadow Wrote:
(11-18-2019, 11:11 PM)Pckts Wrote:
(11-18-2019, 11:17 AM)Shadow Wrote: One more photo concerning that 600 kg (estimated by Sharma) calf carcass. This photo shows in more clear way eaten part of it.


*This image is copyright of its original author
Big animal, definitely not what I'd consider to be a calf but certainly not full grown either.
Also like Rishi said, very rare for Tigers to start with the front, usually they prefer the rump but with a Rhino it may not matter.

Photos of this calf are good examples how perspective can make same carcass to look like small and big depending about is, that is object or animal used to comparison in front or behind.

Big carcass:

*This image is copyright of its original author


Small carcass:

*This image is copyright of its original author


Big carcass:

*This image is copyright of its original author


Those photos are the reason why I trust mostly to it, what Sharma say, 600 kg heavy and that means a calf about 1 years old or a bit older. Nice prey and a lot of eat for a tiger.

There is a big difference between a Tiger and Human being, of course a carcass will look smaller in front of a Tiger compared to a human and it never looked small to me even with the Tiger in front of the Carcass and the People behind the carcass. 
That's a big animal, a 600kg animal with that much meat removed (estimated) is huge, it's as large as most Buffalo bulls and if you've ever seen a Cape buffalo, you know they are big animals. 
In regards to it's age, I'm not sure if it's a year or a couple of years, since I assume the only thing you're going off of was the post about a 600kg Rhino in captivity celebrating it's first bday, but I've already posted a few animals that are being weighed and you can see just how large a 200kg Rhino is, something that is 3-4 times their size will most likely need more time to grow into it. 
Here you can see a one year old Rhino estimated to be 857lbs or 388kg 

"Baby White Rhino "Sawyer" Turns 1!

Rhinoceros baby celebrates his birthday with rhino sized treats

Natural Bridge, VA – August 24th – It's been one year since the Virginia Safari Park welcomed its first baby white rhinoceros, a monumental birth for a critically endangered species. The healthy baby boy was born after a 16-month pregnancy to “Samira” a 6 year-old female. Baby Sawyer weighed about 100 pounds at birth and has gained weight steadily. His zookeepers estimate he weighs roughly 875 pounds today, which is still relatively small compared to the weights of adult females like his mother, Samira, who weigh roughly 3,000 to 4,000 pounds and adult males that can weigh up to 5,000 pounds."
http://www.virginiasafaripark.com/News/TabId/226/ArtMID/1002/ArticleID/26/Baby-White-Rhino-Sawyer-Turns-1.aspx

and here is another one year old in the 800lb area

"February 7 calls for celebration--at least at Cleveland's Metropolitan Zoo. 

The Zoo is celebrating the first birthday of baby rhino Lulu. 

Gaining 850 pounds in one year, the zoo says Lulu is thriving. "

In honor of Lulu's special day and throwback Thursday, the zoo posted photos from her first mud bath.

https://www.wkyc.com/article/news/local/cleveland/happy-birthday-rhino-at-cleveland-zoo-turns-1-year-old/95-c9301406-5a65-4198-b3f3-6244f5103a08#:~:targetText=February%207%20calls%20for%20celebration,from%20her%20first%20mud%20bath.

And this is a 1 year old Wild Rhino




My guess would be that Rhino is older than 1 for sure, it's a large animal.
Especially if it's mother was no longer with it, it most certainly was older than that.

This is very simple actually, here were posted two cases concerning adult rhinos and one was a calf because too small to be something else if we trust Sharma and his weight estimation.

Why calf?

"The calf stays with its mother for about two to three years. Male calves tend to leave their mother sooner than their female counterparts."
https://www.rhinosinfo.com/rhino-birth-and-care-of-the-young.html

"At around 3 years old, the calf will set out on its own. A rhino can live up to 45 years."
https://www.livescience.com/27439-rhinos.html

 "Calves live with their mothers for several years. Females are full-grown at 6½ years and males at about 10 years. Rhinos reach sexual maturity at six to eight years of age."
http://www.torontozoo.com/animals/Greater%20one-horned%20rhinoceros

"Maternal calves: a calf drinks on average 20-30 litres of milk per day and grows by 1-2 kg daily. They start nibbling and feeding on roughage at the age of 3-5 months, but may continue to suck up to the age of 20 months. Young calves are also vulnerable to the predation of tigers in the wild"
https://www.savetherhino.org/rhino-info/rhino-species/greater-one-horned-rhino/

"The calves were rescued in Kaziranga National Park (NP) when they were about one to five months old when they were swept away by flood waters. The calves were hand reared and nursed at the Centre for Wildlife Rehabilitation and Conservation (CWRC) with the aim of releasing them into their natural habitat. They were fed human milk formula until they reached two years of age, and then with concentrates and greens in paddocks in CWRC. At the age of about three years the calves were translocated to Manas NP, about 500 km away from Kaziranga and placed in a pre-release area measuring 600 acres."
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/287892702_Rehabilitation_of_greater_one-horned_rhinoceros_calves_in_Manas_National_Park_a_World_Heritage_Site_in_India

I think, that we can safely use the word calf in this case when we look how professional sources define that word when talking about rhinos.

And why mother not with a calf in Kaziranga...

" Flooding is the major cause of displacement of rhino calves in Kaziranga NP. In a few cases, calves were found alone in the forest for unknown reasons; a few were orphans after poachers killed their mothers, others were failed predation attempts. CRWC took in all these rhinos for treatment and care."
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/287892702_Rehabilitation_of_greater_one-horned_rhinoceros_calves_in_Manas_National_Park_a_World_Heritage_Site_in_India

Debates are ok, but what comes to definition of rhino calf, time to end it. Also it should be clear, that calves do get separated from their mothers and that makes them very vulnerable. Where a 600-800 kg buffalos or gaurs are formidable opponents, same sized rhino calf is... just a kid. When alone.... lost, scared and confused, there is nothing to debate in these things.

Only thing is, that does someone want to question weight estimation of Sharma and by that say, that this third case was adult rhino too. I see there a carcass with only some flesh missing from neck area. It looks like a good time to focus to cases with adult rhinos.

Let's not jump to assumptions on why the Rhino was alone, we don't know if the mother was poached or flooding was involved or the if the Rhino was actually on it's own because of naturally leaving it's mother like they do around 2-3 Years old.
Considering that Rhino was large and alone, your definition of Calf doesn't necessarily apply, in professional sources Rhinos being 800lbs tend to be 1 year old, that is less than half the size of this Rhino killed, so I would think the term Sub Adult fits nicely. 

"The sub-adults at this age have just left their mothers and are still relatively small."
http://www.blackrhinohusbandry.org/field...behaviour/

Just like big cats, Sub Adults aren't fully grown nor are they cubs, but yet they still are with their mothers or they are on their own. The age cut off is subjective, but when one thinks of "cub or calf" they think of an animal dependent on it's mother to survive, this is most likely not the case with this Rhino.


Lastly is that I'm not comparing the Danger of a 700kg Rhino to a 700kg Buffalo but if you think that a Rhino of that size isn't formidable, you'd be mistaken. You can see examples of this with Elephant Calves and youngsters fighting off entire Lion Prides.


There was no assumption in my reply, I quoted some reasons why calves get separated from their mothers to reply to your assumptions.

"My guess would be that Rhino is older than 1 for sure, it's a large animal.
Especially if it's mother was no longer with it, it most certainly was older than that."

What comes to other things I don´t see any need to write again what I already said. My last posting said all what I think about this already and shared links. 

There is also a study about Greater one-horned rhino growth and that´s why I see this small rhino as a calf. 600-700 kg is weight of a very young rhino calf.
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/38988684_The_Ecology_and_Behaviour_of_The_Greater_One-Horned_Rhinoceros
If someone is interested just check Fig. 1.
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#35
( This post was last modified: 11-19-2019, 04:31 AM by Pckts )


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author

The sub adult looks to be with in the range of the Rhino killed in question.


Also in regards to using zoo figures compared to wild figures

*This image is copyright of its original author

And here are measurements for different age groups 

*This image is copyright of its original author

Unfortunately no weights to go along with them.
"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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( This post was last modified: 11-19-2019, 05:27 AM by Shadow )

(11-19-2019, 04:26 AM)Pckts Wrote:
*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author

The sub adult looks to be with in the range of the Rhino killed in question.


Also in regards to using zoo figures compared to wild figures

*This image is copyright of its original author

And here are measurements for different age groups 

*This image is copyright of its original author

Unfortunately no weights to go along with them.

I didn´t see there anything in contradiction with a calf about one year old or a bit older to be around 600 kg. But your main point in this seems to be, that this rhino would have been much heavier and older. When only eaten part in photos is neck area, it´s impossible for me to share that. You are naturally free to believe so if you like.
So basically situation is, that I see there a calf about 600-700 kg and you see something more. Unless more information comes up, there is no point to continue this anymore. 

That last sentence I wrote as a moderator. Nothing wrong in disagreeing, but enough is enough when talking about this irrelevant things concerning topic of this thread. If there is more about rhino size, weight etc. that can be written in thread concerning Greater one-horned rhino, no more in this thread :)
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My main point is that the Rhino looks like a sub adult, the weight is an estimation and I have shown year old rhinos at less than half that estimation. Moderator or not, you've cotinued to speak your piece as I have as well, I agree that it doesnt need to be discussed further though.
"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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Finland Shadow Offline
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( This post was last modified: 11-19-2019, 11:49 AM by Shadow )

(11-19-2019, 06:07 AM)Pckts Wrote: My main point is that the Rhino looks like a sub adult, the weight is an estimation and I have shown year old rhinos at less than half that estimation. Moderator or not, you've cotinued to speak your piece as I have as well, I agree that it doesnt need to be discussed further though.

Yes I did, because I was curious to see a bit how it goes and in this conversation there was nothing surprising really.  And in the end typical outcome, I didn´t see you proving your point and of course it was impossible for me to prove 100% sure, what was the case with this calf (as I see it) because there isn´t enough information available. 

I didn´t say, that time to end this discussion here to kill conversation if there is still will to continue about sizes of calves and adults etc. Just to put it to right place, because it changed to be only about rhino age and size and basically polluting this thread. And when some discussion goes to this level, that possible to continue endlessly, at some point it has to be stopped. Now this matter should be clear and if still something, there is thread Greater one-horned rhinos to discuss about those more. As I have said before, sometimes disagreement is outcome of debate, no matter what and that´s ok, there is nothing wrong in it.
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Welcome to WILDFACT forum, a website that focuses on sharing the joy that wildlife has on offer. We welcome all wildlife lovers to join us in sharing that joy. As a member you can share your research, knowledge and experience on animals with the community.
wildfact.com is intended to serve as an online resource for wildlife lovers of all skill levels from beginners to professionals and from all fields that belong to wildlife anyhow. Our focus area is wild animals from all over world. Content generated here will help showcase the work of wildlife experts and lovers to the world. We believe by the help of your informative article and content we will succeed to educate the world, how these beautiful animals are important to survival of all man kind.
Many thanks for visiting wildfact.com. We hope you will keep visiting wildfact regularly and will refer other members who have passion for wildlife.

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