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Man-eaters

United States Pckts Offline
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(05-18-2015, 04:03 AM)'Pantherinae' Wrote: I heard that Ustad was taken to Captivity...... so sad!!!!

Suspected of killing guard, T-24 shifted from Ranthambore

The nine-year-long reign of Ranthambore's tiger T-24 came to an abrupt end on Saturday. After blaming the big cat for killing a forest guard on May 8, an allegation which many wildlife activists believed had not been proved, the forest department abruptly shifted the tiger popularly known as Ustad to Udaipur's Sajjangarh Biological Park, some 500 km from its territory in Ranthambore Tiger Reserve.

The tiger was tranquilized at around 10.30 am on Saturday and was then set on a nearly 11-hour-long journey to the biological park in a cage. The day temperature was hovering around 40 degree Celsius but ice was stocked and water was sprinkled in the cage to keep it cool for the big cat.

A team of 12 reserve officials and doctors accompanied the canter carrying the cage. The tiger's territory that was spread over 30-40 square kilometer in Ranthambore will now be confined to an enclosure measuring nearly half-a-hectare in the biological park.

Forest officials moved the tiger claiming that it has killed four people in five years, lost fear of humans and become a man-killer.Wildlife activists and conservationists were shocked as they had been assured by the state government that T-24 wouldn't be shifted without a proper enquiry. They are crying foul because they believe it was not proved if T-24 had killed forest guard Rampal Mali on May 8.

Some believed that it was T-72 who killed the guard but T-24 was blamed for the killing.In fact, a committee's formation was underway to decide on the fate of T-24 but sources said bowing to a small but powerful section of hotel lobby in Ranthambore, a senior forest official abruptly decided to shift the tiger on Friday evening.

Sources even said the minister of state for forest and wildlife Rajkumar Rinwa who had promised to postpone the shifting and initiate an enquiry by forming a committee was kept in the dark as the chief minister's office (CMO) had directly intervened."We had been tracking the tiger since last night. After 9 am, T-24 was spotted in Magrad area in the reserve's zone number 2 with tigress T-39, popularly known as Noor. T-24 has fathered two male cubs with Noor," said a reserve official.

T-24 and T-39 were near a Sambar deer that one of them had killed. "T-24 was trying to scare away T-39. At around 9.15 am, T-39 strode away. Different teams of officials surrounded the tiger. Dr Rajeev Garg, a veterinarian, tranquilized the tiger at around 10.30 am. It drifted into unconsciousness an hour later. It was then put into a cage," said the officer.

The officer added that at around 1 pm, the canter carrying the cage left the reserve for Sajjangarh Biological Park. The shifting of the tiger was kept as a low key affair to the extent that even the Sajjangarh Biological Park officials had not been intimidated about the shift officially till afternoon."T-24 had killed forest guard Rampal Mali on May 8.

The next day we were told to be prepared for the shift of the tiger to Sajjangarh. We were prepared but we didn't receive any order from Jaipur authorities or from Ranthambore National Park on Saturday. If it comes, it would be kept in an enclosure," said T Mohan Raj, deputy conservator of forest.

Sources said reserve officials had not sought any permission from Nation Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA). "We don't require permission. The chief wildlife warden can authorize the relocation," said a forest official.

Nine-year-old T-24, that ruled Ranthambore as the largest tiger here, has attracted tourists from all over the world and never disappointed them. He was often clicked sitting on roads, near hotels and the Ganesh temple.Other than the guard, the tiger was blamed for killing 23-year-old Ghamandi Lal Saini on July 3, 2010, a 19-year-old boy in March 2012 and an assistant forester in October 2012.

Ustad's reign ends

Ranthambore's tiger T-24, popularly knows as Ustad, is has been shifted to Udaipur's Sajjangarh Biological ParkForest officials moved the tiger claiming that it has killed four people in five years, lost fear of humans and become a man-killer

Wildlife activists and conservationists are shocked at the move as they had been assured by the state government that T-24 wouldn't be shifted without a proper enquiryThe tiger was tranquilized at 10.30 am on Saturday and was then set on a nearly 11-hour-long journey to the biological park in a cage

A team of 12 reserve officials and doctors accompanied the canter carrying the cage

The tiger's territory, that was spread over 30-40 square km in Ranthambore, will now be confined to an enclosure measuring nearly half-a-hectare

 

The worst thing is it looks like it may have been done illegally and its been kept a secret. No official word from the directory of wild life in India has been released and it wasn't voted on. I also read the details of the death's prior to this
1st death - Man through a hatchet at ustaad and chased him
2nd Death- illegal wood collector in side the park illegally was killed
3rd death - Guard walked up on ustaad unsuspectingly
4th death - Guards wife is collecting wood illegally sees the tiger, calls her husband (forest guard) and her husband tries to "scare the tiger" which Tigers don't budge so easily and he attacks.

All attacks happened inside the park and where caused by irresponsible people, he was never going outside his territory to search out a kill.
Very sad indeed.
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( This post was last modified: 04-14-2016, 09:55 AM by peter )

A MOONLIGHT GHOST

The story in this post isn't a story. The incident described by J.H. Knowles in his book 'In the Grip of the Jungles' published in 1932 (I got the Natraj Publishers reprint of 2007) happened less than a century ago near the Himalayan Station of Mussoorie, overlooking the valley of Dehra-Dun from a height of about 7000 feet:



*This image is copyright of its original author



Knowles published his book before Jim Corbett published his book 'Man-Eaters of Kumaon'. Compare the photographs of both: they could have been brothers. 

I don't doubt that most biologists will dismiss the story below at once, but I did not. Knowles was experienced and contributed to many magazins. Read the story below and do it well, as it shows in what way a confirmed and experienced man-eating tiger presents himself. Than read the story on T-24 (Ustaad) again. 


INTRODUCTION

Knowles was a naturalist, a writer and a hunter who was well-known in his day. One day in November, he was contacted by his friend Bill about a tiger who had just about shut down a large tea estate about 15 miles from the town of Dehra-Dun. Bill was the manager of the estate and asked Knowles to come as quickly as he could.

On his way to the office of the man-eater, a bungalow situated in a smaller garden (Banwali), Knowles and the Gurkha carrying his rifle hired fresh ponies in Dehra Dun. The rough road to the tea garden led into wild country. Than they met a man:

" ... In front of us lay a winding gorge of sheer rock wall, in the centre of which there lived - inside a spacious cave - a wonderful hermit, a Brahmin priest who had the reputation of being able to to predict the future. At the mouth of the cave stood the tall, well-knit, silent figure in yellow robes: " ... Pass on sahib ... ", the priest said, " ... your call is urgent ... " (pp. 3). I saluted him. " ... Do not enter the Banwali bungalow without your loaded rifles ... ", he warned. I then saw him bending down to whisper something to Bacha Sing (the Gurkha), who seemed to start back in alarm! I knew it was useless to question the peon, as he would be sworn to silence. Two hours later Bill, his young assistent, Jackson, and I were discussing our plans for that memorable night ... " (pp. 3).

It is about what the priest said to the Gurkha who carried the rifle of Knowles. Remember that part.

  
THE HUNT

Knowles, his friend Bill and his assistent Jackson had agreed to travel to the deserted part of the tea estate (the Banwali bungalow) at midnight by bullock cart. Just the three of them. The bullocks would carry tinkling bells in order to attract the man-eater. The Gurkha's of the tea estate (as well as the one carrying his rifle) were ordered not to follow them.

On their way towards the estate two hours later, they saw a big black bear dashing across the road to their rear. They knew he had been startled by the tiger, who was following them. Just before they reached the Banwali bungalow, they heard the deafening trumpet of an enraged wild elephant. The bullocks came to a dead halt. When they saw the tusker meant business, the frightened bullocks suddenly ran forward. Jackson was hurled in the air, not to be seen again, and Knowles and his friend Bill were swung clean out of the cart and fell heavily to the ground.

They lied stunned on the ground and saw the cart rattling down the drive, carrying away their rifles, back in the direction from which they had come. With some difficulty, they reached the bungalow. While trying to revive his friend with whiskey, an enormous dark shadow the size of a buffalo looms up.

Try to imagine the situation. Three men out to kill a man-eater who had closed down an entire tea estate fell from a bullock cart just before they reached their destination. One of them was lying somewhere close by, whereas the other two, shocked and hurt, walked to the bungalow. In the bungalow, one of the two, while trying to revive his friend, saw the shadow of what seemed to be a very large tiger on the front porch. The doors of the bungalow were not closed:



*This image is copyright of its original author



At the mercy of the man-eater and without their rifles, they had no option but to wait for the inevitable. The tiger played them. With seconds to go, the tiger is shot and killed. Not by Jackson, but by the Gurkha's who had strict orders not to follow the three men, no matter what. They had been there all the time! Why was that?

One reason was it was against their nature to wait and see. Furthermore, the priest had ordered them to go. He told them Jackson would be the victim of the tiger and urged the Gurkhas to take 'Fate by the horns' and save him. They picked up one of the rifles of Bill, took a short cut through the jungle and reached the bungalow long before the three men did. In hiding, they too were surprised when the tiger approached the front door of the bungalow. In order not to startle him, which could have resulted in him killing the men, they had stalked the tiger round to the back of the bungalow and then shot him. 


CONCLUSIONS

1 - About a century ago, a man-eating tiger shut down an entire tea estate situated about 15 miles from the city of Dehra Dun. 

2 - The three men who decided to hunt the tiger in the middle of the night were hunters, but they didn't really know about man-eaters. On top of that, they told those who had experience (the Gurkha's working at the estate) to stay away. The nail on their coffins were the bells carried by the buffalos. When they knew they were followed by the man-eater, they were surprised by a wild tusker. As a result, the buffalo's ran and the men were hurled out of the cart with their rifles. One of the three was lost, whereas the other two barely made it to the bungalow. Inside, but with the doors of the bungalow still open, they were surprised by the man-eater who took his time telling them exactly what he had in mind. How not to hunt a man-eating tiger.

3 - There is hunting and there's hunting dangerous animals like man-eating big cats. Those who hunted man-eaters often failed. We don't know about that, because those who failed seldom wrote books. Animals who hunt humans have to be intelligent. Hunting them, therefore, takes skill and knowledge, but endurance, experience and luck are as important, if not more so. Luck? Yes, plain luck. In this story, there is the priest, the Gurkhas, the tusker and, finally, the tiger. He could have taken the two men right away, but he didn't. And Jackson, the most likely victim? Well, they found him and he lived to tell the tale.

4 - In the end, it also is about being able to act in an adequate way when it counts. The man-eater was a large male who succeeded to surprise both the Gurkha's and the men inside the bungalow. In full view of them, he played his favorite game. The Gurkha's knew he could kill the men inside when they made one mistake. That's why they decided to stalk the tiger round to the back of the bungalow. This takes time, skill and nerves. Than they had to kill him with one shot. And that's what they did. 

If I would have been Knowles, I would have have carried the rifle of the man who shot the tiger from then on (the Gurkha he hired to carry his rifle). In the days if the British Raj, this wasn't done. But the story made the Gurkha famous. Better than carry his rifle, perhaps.
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Man-eaters — When Caring Less May Actually HelpThe shooting of a man-eating tiger, as it happened recently in the Nilgiris, Tamil Nadu — barely two weeks after two other tigers preyed on four people in neighbouring Karnataka — invariably polarises public opinion. Locals, whose lives are at risk, want maneaters shot. Animal lovers, on the other hand, demand their “safe capture.” Caught in the middle, officials have to confront increasingly angry mobs, while authorities in Delhi insist on elaborate “operating procedures.” In Bandipur, Karnataka, after dozens of attempts at darting a tiger with a tranquillizing gun had failed, and after the big cat killed its third victim, angry locals burnt the forest office, forcing forest staff to abandon the scene. A posse of armed police had to control the situation, until the 12-year-old infirm male tiger was finally darted.Science and practical experience clearly show that we cannot care for every individual wild tiger. Animal lovers and conservationists should therefore focus on saving the species as a whole, rather than worry about saving every individual. Conservation interventions must therefore be guided by scientific evidence and social practicality, rather than emotion.Understanding tigersMy tiger research and conservation of three decades focusses on the central Western Ghats, which consists of forests in Karnataka and adjacent parts of Kerala and Tamil Nadu. This landscape now harbours the largest tiger population globally. However, the 400 or so big cats in my study area are restricted to reserves comprising less than 10 per cent of the total area. With the overall landscape populated by 15 million people, public support for conservation is critical to tiger survival in the long term.Studies show that tiger populations in some well-protected reserves, such as Nagarahole and Bandipur, in Karnataka, have dramatically rebounded, with their numbers attaining near saturation densities of 10-15 tigers per 100 sq.km. A substantial part of the credit for this must go to the forest departments of these three States. With the control of hunting and cattle grazing, deer, gaur and wild pigs have attained optimum densities of 20 or more animals per square kilometre, which is crucial for a healthy tiger population.Every wild tiger requires a prey base of 500 animals to sustain it. When prey becomes abundant, individual tiger territories shrink and breeding increases. A single female may produce 10-15 cubs in her lifetime, an average of one cub a year. Consequently, thriving tiger populations produce annual surpluses, pushing dispersing sub-adults and old tigers to the edges of reserves.These are the animals that prey on livestock and, more rarely, on humans, becoming “problem tigers.”Tiger-human conflictOn rare occasions, tigers may accidentally attack persons moving in dense cover, mistaking them for prey, or in self-defence, when surprised. Sometimes they may even consume the victim. But if they do not subsequently prey on humans, these tigers also cannot be called “maneaters.” However, attacks occur when uncontrollable mobs surround and harry “problem tigers” when they venture out of reserves. Such tigers are not “maneaters.”True maneaters are individual animals that persistently stalk and hunt human beings, after losing their instinctive fear. They pose a serious risk to local people and must be swiftly removed. By my reckoning there have been less than half-a-dozen such cases in the last decade in this region, three instances in the last two months. In all these cases, the tigers were injured, aged or infirm. Even so, maneaters do not prey exclusively on humans. They also kill livestock or wild prey opportunistically. There is no evidence at all that tigers get “addicted” to human flesh as common lore has it.The critical point is that recent cases of conflict in the Western Ghats, central India and the Terai are a consequence of rebounding tiger numbers. In some sense, these rare instances of conflict we are witnessing are the price of conservation successes. In contrast, in the extensive but overhunted forests of the tribal belts of Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand, Odisha and the North Eastern Hill States, tigers have been either extirpated totally, or occur at low densities. In these regions, where tiger conservation has clearly failed, tiger-human conflict is virtually non-existent. This is not good news for tigers.Research shows that in my study area, 20 per cent of the tiger population is lost every year due to several causes: fights between rivals, injuries, starvation, poaching and official removals by shooting or capture, following conflict incidents. I estimate that at least 50-75 tigers are being lost this way annually, although only a fraction of these mortalities are detected. However, such loss is not a cause for worry in itself as the birth of new tigers makes up for it.To kill or not to kill?Given this inevitable annual loss of 20 per cent in thriving populations, trying to “rescue” a few man-eating tigers is irrelevant to accomplishing the conservation objective of expanding and stabilising wild tiger populations. Tigers involved in conflict incidents are often seriously injured, infirm or old. If captured and removed to a zoo, they suffer a life of perpetual stress from years in captivity. Caring for these doomed tigers misdirects scarce resources that could be used for conserving their wild relatives. Sadly, for old and injured “conflict tigers,” a humane and quick death may be the best option.Well-meaning animal lovers often do not understand that in high-pressure conflict situations, safe chemical capture of a free-ranging tiger is difficult or even impossible. Darting a stressed out animal playing hide-and-seek is an extremely difficult task. On the other hand, shooting the animal with a gun is often far easier, and saves human lives.When precious days are spent in clumsy attempts to “rescue” maneaters, growing public anger seriously undermines the long-term support crucial for wild tigers, protected areas and the forest personnel who guard them. Overall, the future of wild tigers as a species is rendered more precarious when local public anxiety and anger are not quickly dealt with by eliminating the problem animal. By caring for individual wild tigers far too deeply, we may be dooming the species.To save the tiger for posterity, we need to work on expanding protected area coverage, and reducing adverse human impacts. Both these require increased local support for tiger conservation. Yet, this is precisely what is undermined when human-tiger conflict escalates. While a few animal lovers may feel good if a maneater is “rescued” rather than killed, the cause of tiger conservation suffers.In this overall context, the decision of the Tamil Nadu government to shoot the maneater in the Nilgiris, rather than persist in pointless rescue attempts, was the right thing to do.
http://www.conservationindia.org/feature...ually-help
 
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An activist has moved the Delhi high court to save a Ranthambore tiger, better known as Ustad, from losing his freedom over what he says are unproven charges of being a man-killer.The male tiger believed to have killed four humans was shifted on Saturday from Ranthambore National Park to Sajjangarh Biological Park in Udaipur in a highly secretive move, drawing a sharp rebuke from the country’s highest tiger conservation body for alleged violation of standard operating procedure.The eight-year-old tiger, officially known as number T-24, will be kept in captivity at Sajjangarh, forest department sources said.A PIL filed on Ustad's relocation by a wildlife enthusiast who visits Ranthambore every three months alleged the tiger had been wrongfully accused of being a man-eater without any evidence.The decision to translocate Ustad was made “without scientific probe or investigation”, and in response to public pressure, it said.Sources said the “hasty decision” to shift T-24 was taken under pressure from a lobby which has interests in the lucrative tourism business at the park, visited by more than 2.5 lakh people every year. The 392-square-km park, 170km from Jaipur, houses more than 55 tigers besides other exotic animals.The tiger’s last human kill was on May 8 when it had mauled a forest guard, sources said, adding the lobby was apprehensive the big cat’s presence could lead to reduction in tourist footfall.The PIL did not say Ustad was also accused of killing three other men: a 23-year-old man in 2010, and a 19-year-old boy and a forest official in March and October 2012, respectively.
 
“We neither received a preliminary report about the tiger’s behaviour nor any technical report recommending its shifting. The tiger shifting move is in violation of the SOP and not in the right spirit. We will study what course of action is to be taken in this case as there has been no precedent,” said Bishan Singh Bonal, member secretary of the National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA).
 
Deputy conservator of forest at Ranthambore, Sudarshan Sharma, said he was not aware whether any report was sent to the NTCA, while forest minister Raj Kumar Rinwa said he would look into alleged violation of SOP in the shifting process.
 
“This is the worst and most unfortunate incident that could happen in wildlife. Officials have tried to hide their lackadaisical attitude in monitoring tigers by simply shifting a healthy tiger,” said RN Mehrotra, former head of the forest department.
 
Former wildlife advisor Dr Raza Tehsin said the move to shift the tiger to an enclosure from an open habitat was not a right decision.He said any animal would not attack an individual unless and until he/she was disturbed from a close distance.At Sajjangarh, Ustad was moved in a cage packed with ice for the 530km journey. Ustad’s enclosure was previously occupied by a tiger called Monu who died of leptospirosis last month.In a new home, Ustad refused to eat buffalo meat. Live bait is being considered by park authorities now.Sources said Rajasthan minister for forest and wildlife Rajkumar Rinwa had claimed that he did not have any information on the decision to shift the tiger.The minister had also claimed that he had constituted a committee to investigate the issue, sources said.According to officials, the minister claimed that if the committee finds that the tiger was not responsible for the attacks, then it would be shifted back to the Ranthambore National Park.
http://www.hindustantimes.com/jaipur/man...48261.aspx
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( This post was last modified: 05-18-2015, 10:36 PM by Pckts )


*This image is copyright of its original author
Aditya Singh Follow · May 15 · Edited ·    
"A close encounter with Ustaad. We blocked his way in a narrow road deliberately. We wanted him to cross the jeep from the back, where we were looking to photograph...."
If this is what "tiger lovers" who claim to be very aware about environmental issues behave...............than what more can I say frown emoticon I wonder who all were part of the same group.
#Saveustad #SaveUstaad #SaveT24 #Savethetiger #SaveRTR



 
Also, there is a new attack from a female w/cubs that just happened.

 
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The big cat is doing well in the large core zone of the Sathyamangalam Tiger Reserve in spite of the considerable human presence in its vicinity. A trek in the reserve offers an abundance of animal signs and sightings. By A.J.T. JOHNSINGH and R. RAGHUNATHAROUND 3 A.M. on June 12, 2014, a young man was sitting quietly among the bushes beside the Sathyamangalam-Dhimbam Ghat Highway in Tamil Nadu waiting for two of his friends who were searching for spare parts that had spilled out of a vehicle when it overturned near the 25th hairpin bend on the road. A male leopard hunting in the area, mistaking him for prey, killed and carried him away. When his friends returned a little later, he was missing. Since there had been an incident of a leopard attacking a two-wheeler rider on the highway a few days earlier, his friends panicked and reported the matter to the Forest Department. A search was launched in the morning, and the body was found with part of the neck and sternum eaten. It was perhaps the first reported incident of a leopard eating a human in the Sathyamangalam forest.Nearly a month later, the leopard struck again, this time around 7 p.m. The victim was a 56-year-old forest guard on duty at the Dhimbam-Thalaimalai check post. The Forest Department swung into action. Camera traps were placed around the second kill site. The leopard, which was in the habit of hunting langur along the highway, was identified by a conspicuous mark on its body. By using cage traps with dogs as bait, the animal was caught on July 24 and sent to the Aringar Anna Zoological Park at Vandaloor near Chennai.There was no reason for the leopard in its prime, with no injury and all its canines intact, to go for a human kill in an area where there was sufficient prey in the form of langurs, barking deer, chowsingha, sambar, wild pigs and cattle. It had perhaps learnt from killing the young man that humans were easy prey.The Sathyamangalam Tiger Reserve, with an area of approximately 1,400 square kilometres (the core area being 790 sq km and the buffer zone 610 sq km), is the largest reserve in Tamil Nadu. It has seven forest ranges. Doli Parai in the Germalam range is the highest location (5,800 feet, or 1,767 metres). By virtue of its location, the reserve plays a crucial role in forming a link between the Eastern and the Western Ghats. In the north and the west, it is contiguous with the Biligiri Rangaswamy and Bandipur Tiger Reserves of Karnataka and in the east and the south with the Erode Forest Division and the Nilgiri North and Coimbatore Forest Divisions in Tamil Nadu. All these forest areas form part of the greater Nilgiris landscape.
http://www.frontline.in/environment/wild...715848.ece

Beautiful Tiger from the same area

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( This post was last modified: 04-14-2016, 10:05 AM by peter )

THE NJOMBE MAN-EATERS


a - Rinderpest

In the early thirties of the last century, in what's now Tanzania, there was an outbreak of rinderpest. As farmers wanted to protect domestic cattle, it was decided to erect a fence in order to prevent the disease from spreading south (into Rhodesia, now Zimbabwe). As the fence had a length of some 150 miles (...), it had to be maintained. Gamekeepers also had to kill all wild animals within 5 miles on either side of it (wild animals can spread the disease). 


b - The connection between witch-doctors and man-eaters 

When Rushby got the job, he also read reports about villagers killed by lions. Although many had been killed over the years, no action had been taken. As villagers had no means to protect themselves (they were not allowed to carry guns), witch doctors saw an opportunity. One of the results was that only very few villagers were prepared to talk to Rushby. This is why it took him a long time to get the information he was after.


c - The effect of a fence on territorial animals

When the fence was erected, herbivores moved to green pastures. Lions, territorial animals, didn't have the opportunity to follow them and the result was poverty. The starving lions had to find a solution and not a few of them concluded domestic cattle could be a decent chance. The problem was domestic animals lived in villages. Not every village had animals, but they most certainly had villagers and starvation is starvation.


d - Seasonal man-eaters

Starving big cats sometimes kill and eat villagers, but most drop the habit when conditions change in their favour. When wild animals move out of the territory of an adult big cat again, chances are the cat returns to humans. For this reason, seasonal man-eaters are difficult to identify. Females often are involved. When they carry cubs, they select a home unattractive for other cats. The main reason it is not attractive, is no food and (too) many humans.

Females with very young cubs living close to villages at times suffer from changing conditions and starvation. During the monsoon, when animals disperse, they sometimes have no option but to hunt domestic animals. As villagers protect their animals, chances are a big cat hunting them will be confronted by herd boys sooner or later. Not all big cats attack them, but some do and develop into man-eaters. 


e - Man-eating lions

Tigers are solitary animals, but lions live in small groups (adolescents) or prides (extended family groups). This means it's very likely they will pass on information. When a lion faced with starvation learns to hunt humans and decides to develop his abilities, chances are he or she won't be alone when a village is (re)visited. The result is the number of victims often rapidly grows. Another result is hunters have to identity and find more than one individual. This is the reason it usually takes a long time to take them out.

Experienced man-eaters, and elderly males in particular, know they are hunted. This is why they seldom return to their victims and this is why they cover many miles after a kill. They seldom roar and try to stay under the radar. Elusive animals. When the pressure is mounting, they disappear completely at times. Some quit the habit to stay undetected, only to continue when things cool down. A moderate continuation, that is. An experienced man-eater doesn't want to attract attention. Bad for health.

             
f - Specialists

Even in conditions that do not favour them, confirmed man-eaters seldom develop into specialists. It is estimated that the Njombe man-eaters killed and consumed about 1500 villagers between 1932 and 1947. As this comes down to about 100 villagers per year, it means the pride involved (Rusby shot 15 animals, if I remember correctly) had to rely on other food sources. The reason is a man-eater hunting humans only needs 50-100 villagers a year to stay healthy. This suggests that humans were not an important food source for the Njombe man-eaters. But 100 villagers a year and 1500 in about 15 years is impressive by any standard.

Specialists were and are the exception to the rule. Cats who develop in this direction always leave a clear trail. Another disadvantage is their moves can be predicted to a degree. This is why experienced hunters prefer specialists over opportunists. Although many books have been written about successful hunts, only few had a result. Kenneth Anderson wrote different stories about man-eaters who had been able to turn the tables. Werner Fend, hunting a tigress with an impressive record in Orissa, needed a lot of time to contact her. The tension and conditions affected his health. In order to stand a chance, you needed experience, fitness and mental stability. And luck. Lots of it.

Most man-eaters who died of old age were opportunists who hunted humans every now and then, albeit it for a long period of time. This was in particular true for regions where hunters were few and far between, but India also had a lot of seasoned and elusive man-eaters.     


g - Tanzania today

Outbreaks of man-eating are not uncommon in Tanzania. I've read more than one book written by those who hunted them and I also saw different documentaries. Every outbreak has a particular reason. Some of the researchers who spent years trying to find the causes published documents, but not all. 

Starvation isn't always the reason big cats decide to hunt humans. Amur tigers, facing difficult conditions most years, often struggle to make ends meet. Not a few adolescents and young adults are classified as 'problem animals'. Although many of them visit villages and hunt dogs, man-eaters are few and far between. It could be a result of a low densities (of both humans and big cats), but 'culture' could be a factor as well. Wild Amur tigers, apart from those who hunt them, never hunt humans. It definitely isn't a result of a different make-up, as they are prepared to take on even bears. It's also known that captive Amur tigers are far from harmless. 

Tanzania always had man-eaters. If you read the statistics, the conclusion is lions see humans as a source of food at times. Same for tigers in some parts of India and, in particular, Nepal. A professional hunter operating in Nepal wrote he often had to hunt man-eaters. So often, it interfered with his business. Northern India also often had man-eaters. Still has. 

So what is the reason some regions produced man-eaters, whereas others did not? Why is it the habit disappeared in some regions and not others? My guess is culture might have something to do with it. In my dictionary, culture isn't something that is developed by one species. It takes two to tango, meaning those interested in the causes of man-eating need to consider human culture as well.      

    
h - The documentary

Rusby wrote about his experiences. The documentary, which was broadcasted some years ago, is interesting. Recommended:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D-5bjWeCwmQ
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( This post was last modified: 04-13-2016, 06:03 PM by peter )

MAN-EATING LIONESS SHOT IN ZIMBABWE


This is a short video about a lioness who had killed and eaten a human in Zimbabwe. The lioness, a big and old animal, was in a very poor condition. The reason was she had been severely affected by a disease known as feline AIDS.

The lioness, who most probably lived on her own, had approached a camp and tried to surprise a hunter taking a shower. He saw her in time. At midnight, she gave it another try. Again she was seen. A few hours later, at another camp, she killed a man. He was completely consumed.

They found her next morning a few hundred yards away and shot her.

The video has a number of photographs and an explanation. To the point and clear:  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jakKUkKTM6c
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( This post was last modified: 04-14-2016, 04:14 AM by Pckts )

Anybody watch the documentary "serial killer: Tiger?"
 Just caught the last part yesterday and its about a tigress in Corbett who has been reeking havoc, here body count is past 14 and she still hasn't been caught.
Has anybody heard about this girl?

Edit: This is the girl i'm speaking of...
For the last six weeks, those living in India’s northeast states have been looking over their shoulders whenever they venture outside: Since Dec. 29, a tigress has killed 10 people, eluding determined hunters at every step of its murderous spree.

The 440-pound cat’s latest victim was a 50-year-old man mauled to death Sunday while gathering firewood in Uttarakhand state, in the country’s northeast corner. “The animal ate parts of the man’s leg and abdomen before being scared away by shovel-wielding villagers,” reports the Associated Press.

The day before, hunters cornered the big cat, which has been given the name Mysterious Queen. But it was not enticed by a trap baited with a live cow.

In the six weeks since killing its first victim—a 21-year-old man who was to be married the following day—the tigress’ trail of death has stretched nearly 80 miles, with attacks coming at intervals of between two and 16 days.

Officials believe the predator wandered from its home in the Corbett Tiger Preserve, which was established in the 1930s to safeguard endangered Bengal tigers.

Tiger conservationists cannot say with certainty why Mysterious Queen is preying on humans, but one expert surmised it might be because it is simply hungry. “The animal has started attacking humans because it is not getting its natural prey,” said Rupek De, chief wildlife warden of Uttar Pradesh, the state where it mauled its first victim.

The most recent survey of India’s tigers, conducted in 2010, totaled 1,706, a sliver of the 45,000 that prowled the nation’s forested hillsides in the early 1900s.

Fueled by Asia’s black market, where tiger body parts are in high demand for use in traditional medicine, more than 40 tigers were poached last year in India, the most since 2005.

Mysterious Queen’s binge on human flesh is a sad counterpoint to the great news India’s tigers received earlier this month: A study published in the journal Biological Conservation revealed that 98 percent of people living in the Terai Arc Landscape—a 2,700-square-mile swath of mountainous terrain that includes the Corbett Tiger Preserve—would be willing to allow the government to pay for their families to be relocated to more urban areas.

This move would serve two ends. Fewer people would be in the proximity of tigers, likely decreasing the opportunities for more deadly encounters. And the tigers’ historical range, no longer touched by the heavy hand of human pastoral living (grazing livestock and the clear-cutting of forests for firewood), would be allowed to return to a habitat more friendly to tigers—and their non-human prey.

Unfortunately, this relocation program didn’t come soon enough to save Mysterious Queen’s 11 victims—the 10 dead humans, and the tigress itself, who, eventually, will surely be killed by its relentless hunters.
https://www.yahoo.com/news/man-eating-ti...tml?ref=gs
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#55

Deepak Talan


The Khitauli Male, MPBT 3, who killed four people along with his brother before he was rescued and put in enclosure, has been transferred to Vanvihar, Bhopal yesterday. One brother still remains in the enclosure and he may be the part of an unprecedented experiment where Man Killer Tigers can be reintroduced into wild after brainwashing. But it will take lot of courage on the side of Authorities. Lets see what happens.


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"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
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( This post was last modified: 12-15-2016, 09:06 AM by Pckts )

Must watch! 
This tiger has killed a few people in Assam and Is being tracked by drone.

I have never seen anything like this.

https://www.facebook.com/paridhi.high/po...7140741763
"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
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#57

(12-15-2016, 09:03 AM)Pckts Wrote: Must watch! 
This tiger has killed a few people in Assam and Is being tracked by drone.

I have never seen anything like this.

https://www.facebook.com/paridhi.high/po...7140741763

Here is the article about the drone
http://www.ndtv.com/india-news/forest-de...er-1632939



and the embedded video



"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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#58

A first hand account of the incident above

Smarajit Ojah

Yesterday's Tiger incident in Dolabari, Tezpur was one hell of an experience for me. I'm sure I was saved by Mother Nature's blessings! I was on Rajumala, the departmental elephant with Doley, the mahout and Vishnu, the frontline staff who was armed with a DBBL. I had a Searchlight in my hand. We were trying to seek out the Royal Bengal Tiger amidst a paddy field when all of a sudden, our team came across the tiger crouched low among the paddy, we were just a couple of feet away. The tiger turned n faced us, growled. Vishnu lifted his DBBL gun, all ready to fire in self defense. Our elephant, Rajumala, started to turn and now our backs were towards the crouched, growling tiger. Vishnu whispered if he should fire in the air, I clasped his mouth to keep him absolutely quiet. I used my torch to signal the JCB where the tranquilizing team comprising of Kausik Barua and DrSamshul Ali were present and ready. All this while, my back was just a few feet away from the tiger, leaving me wondering why on earth it had still not attacked me. I indicated silently to Doley to take the elephant away from the tiger. Doley very slowly took Rajumala away from the tiger, towards the elephant, every step of Rajumala meant a few more feet between us and the Tiger. When we were about 5 meters away, I saw the JCB and the Tranquilizing team had started to move towards us and it was about 15 meters away from us. That would have been a catastrophe. So against all common sense, I jumped off the elephant and made a dash for the JCB. I could hear the growls just behind me, those deep vibrations sent shivers through me as I ran. As I reached the JCB, I informed Kaushik da and Samshul about the location and the behaviour of the RBT, then the duo climbed on the two elephants, Rajumala and Vikram and accompanied by armed guards, they moved in to tranquilize the tiger. As they moved, I followed in the JCB. When they were a few meters away, Kaushik da took aim and fired the tranquilizing dart, but unfortunately, it bounced off. All hell broke loose, the Tiger suddenly jumped towards the elephants, and man, I remembered that famous video shot by Sri R K Das in Kaziranga, Vishnu had no option to fire in self defense, He did not flinch and fired, forcing the tiger to abandon its attack and run away. We witnessed the unimaginable, a full grown Royal Bengal Tiger jump more than 10 feet from a crouched position, turn mid-air when being fired upon and then run away majestically. It ran towards the parked vehicles of the forest officials and press, smashed the windscreen of the Bolero of P.Sivakumar, CF, NAC and then ran off while we chased on elephant back and JCB, but it disappeared. After sometime we came to know that it had injured a person about a kilometer away from the site. We rushed to the spot and again me, Saurav Borkataki da, Rohini Saikia, Sivakumar sir, Kausik da, DrSamshul, among others used the departmental elephants to sweep the site. It was pitch dark, we just had torches and an armed guard each, it was a dense bamboo patch with ponds along with many houses all around. We searched for an hour or so, but in vain. It was 11.50 pm and by then abandoned the search. That was last night. An experience relived, I had faced similar situation in 2009 (Nagabandha, Morigaon), 2011 (Bhurbandha), 2012 (Bhogamukh), 2013 (Borguli, Nagaon), 2015 (Bhurbandha), 2016 (Twice in Dolabari). But this one was by far the largest of all tigers, maybe a close second to the one in Nagabandha (2009). Guess it was the blessings of Mother Nature that kept me from certain death. Thrills n a huge learning experience.
Pic courtesy Rohini Saikia

*This image is copyright of its original author

"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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( This post was last modified: 12-21-2016, 07:41 AM by Vinay )

Stop 'Disneysing' Wild Tigers please,yup,i'm talking about Ustad T-24.The notorious man-eater

50Kg leopard don't care humans how can anyone imagine 222 kg Cat won't eat humans?? 

Generally Tigers are highly territorial animals and they won't attack/hunt/kill animals except they are hungry or threatened so humans are mostly safe but once he sensed the weakness of human he will hunt humans too.

99% sure Ustad opened this door(by mistake!) 


*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author


http://www.dickysingh.com/2015/10/16/t-2...thambhore/

It's very gory and disturbing....Avoid it if possible.Anyway,if Chicken or Rat weights 150 kg they also eat/hunt humans.Period.  Funny
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( This post was last modified: 12-21-2016, 02:47 AM by Pckts )

@Vinay there is more that goes into Man eaters or Man hunters than just big cats being big cats. While I also believe that predators are just doing what predators do naturally, there is usually extenuating circumstances that contribute to "man eaters" such as
Injuries, Habitat Invasion, old age or with Ustad's case, he was captured multiple times and could of contributed towards his man eating ways.
You can find this discussion here http://wildfact.com/forum/topic-male-tig...anthambore
"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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