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Lions of Sabi Sands

Australia Herekitty Offline
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@Pbonz 

(11-07-2018, 01:31 PM)vinodkumarn Wrote: @Pbonz 

Nkuhumas Pride
6 sub-adults (1 male + 5 females) aged 28 - 30 months. sired by Bboys
Adopted 3 Mhangeni sub-adult males (30 months - 36 months) and 1 to 3 talamati sub-adult males (3 to 4 years)
Mhangenis  were sired by Majingalanes, Talamatis were sired by Selati males

Othawa Pride
3 Adults (2 sired by Mapogos, youngest sired by Majingalanes), 3 male cubs of around 7-9 month old sired by Majingalanes. 
Looks like the younger lioness also given birth (Cubs likely sired by Matimbas)

 
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Romania The Infamous Offline
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(12-06-2018, 06:37 AM)Pbonz Wrote: So the Othawa male is a Majingilane son correct?
The Mhangenis are from Mapogos? 
The talmati subs and mhangeni subs are who’s? 
So confusing keeping up with it all lol. 

Also, in the Mapogo documentary, the selati males were seen in it. What happened to them? And the last Tsalala male cub was Mapogo which was killed by Majingilane?
The Othawa male is a Majingilane son with a Mapogo daughter from the Othawa pride,Mhangenis are a Breakway form Tsalala/Marthly Pride which was controlled at one moment by Mr T and Kinky Tail.
Talamati the youngest of them sired by Selatis, and the older ones by the Matimbas.
Regarding the Selatis:one of them Hank(the largest of them) was killed by a buffalo,one by the Manjigilane,another one i dont know what happened with him, and the fourth one as far as i know has not been seen for a long time.
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Canada Pbonz Offline
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Is it possible the talmati male that was kicked out by the Avocas will meet the Othawa male that’s alone? There’s also the young touchwood male to
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United States Peteporker Offline
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Singita November Blog 

https://wildlife.singita.com/safari-stor...with-pride

The lions have been extremely active this month. The Mhangene pride is growing in size and they are gaining numbers, as there is a constant change within the pride families.

Here is a quick recap of what has been happening, at least of what we can understand. Of the four original Mhangene lionesses, there are now only three adult lionesses within the pride. We are unsure as to the disappearance of the fourth lioness, but it is probable that she met an untimely fate early in the year. The three adult lionesses have accepted a single lioness, which was part of their second litter, often referred to as the ‘Mhangene sub-adults’. This has been one very fortunate lioness, as acceptance into a pride after gaining independence rarely occurs. It has been interesting to watch the changes in behaviour within the pride when the older lionesses interact with the sub-adult lioness. Even though the sub-adult has been accepted it is noted that she is often the last to move in to feed on a carcass and rarely shows much bonding with the older lionesses, which generally would involve head rubbing or mutual grooming, strengthening bonds with the pride. The one interesting observation has been that the sub-adult is very accepting of the new cubs and often shows a great deal of affection to the younger cubs, and her tolerance levels seem far higher than the mothers as the young cubs bite her tail or use her as an obstacle whilst playing amongst each other.

A very interesting change, has been the acceptance of the Othawa male by the three adult Mhangene lionesses. In normal circumstances another adult male being in the same vicinity of young cubs would be a direct threat as the male would instinctively kill the cubs, since they are not biologically related and he would not want to spend energy ensuring that other lions’ genes will be passed on. Lionesses also will not be receptive to mating with a new male lion while they are nursing, so killing the cubs enables the male lion to procreate, ensuring his genes are with the generation of cubs whilst he reigns over the territory.
Two weeks ago, after following a single lioness track into the Sand River, it turned out that I was walking on the very same path that the lioness was using to return to her well concealed den-site. After standing still and listening for a few minutes before proceeding with following the tracks, I could hear the grunting sounds of newborn cubs. With a quick retreat to the vehicle, I maneuvered into the Sand River to conclusively see what I was hearing. As I ventured down into the dry riverbed, I noticed two lionesses lying on the sand not too far from where I had been tracking. I stopped and within a short period of time, a third lioness appeared out of the reed thickets with three very small cubs following closely behind her. Finding the lionesses was rewarding alone, but being able to say that you had found a den-site for the first time in your guiding career was truly a gem of a reward that will not easily be forgotten. As the cubs are now approximately two months old, they can now be viewed with strict protocols. This is a highlight and a unique opportunity to watch these cubs interacting with the older cubs and exploring their new surroundings.

Even though the male has no direct involvement in parental care of the cubs, the security of a territory is vital to the safe-keeping of the cubs until they reach sub-adulthood. Another facet to watch has been the interactive behavior of the Othawa male lion with the lionesses and the cubs. The cubs have yet to be seen moving close to the male. The handsome male will often snarl and growl at the cubs as they venture over to him with curiosity and often the snarl is enough of a warning to suggest it may not be a good idea to interact at all.

Now this is where is gets really interesting. The Matimba male coalition of two aging males continues to remain west of Singita and on occasion they move slightly east due to following the Othawa pride. The Othawa pride consists of three lionesses, three young cubs with an approximate age of six months, and to add further exciting news a new litter of cubs has been reported with one of the Othawa lionesses. There have been no visual signs of the cubs yet, thus indicating that they are too small to be moved at present.

So with all this happening the Matimba males seemingly ignore the roars from the Othawa male at present, however as the Othawa male spends a great deal of his time with the Mhangene lionesses which are currently moving in a small spectrum around the south eastern areas of Singita, this results in his roars being heard by the neighbouring Birmingham male lions which could result in some serious trouble if they move across further west to investigate the roars.

Until now, there has been a quietness amongst the demographics of the lions, however it could change overnight. I guess that is the wild for you, it can be cruel and kind, however we continue to relish being a part of it every day.

Mhangene lioness (photographed above) successfully hunts a warthog on her own, soon to be overpowered by the Othawa male. The male capitalises on staying with the females, knowing their success rate will only benefit him greatly as he gains the most from their food source due to his strength and size.


By Ross Couper
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Australia Herekitty Offline
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Credit: Sabi Sabi Game Reserve. After an extensive tracking, session we located 4 lions - 3 young males and a young female - who seemed to be very nervous around the vehicles. We assume they must have been kicked out of their pride recently and are nomadic at the moment and a bit unfamiliar in a new area. Image by Kevin Van de Linde, December 7, 2018


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author
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Australia Herekitty Offline
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MALAMALA TODAY: December 7th&8th. It has been a rather hot 48hrs on the reserve and, if the weather forecaster is to be believed, it’s a prelude to heavy rains in the next day or two. 7 sightings of lions: The Fourways pride have returned onto the reserve - they were found in eastern Flockfield. Members of the Kambula pride and Gowrie males were viewed on both days in 6 separate sightings. It’s interesting to see how the mothers are ‘chopping and changing’ their cubs. Quite often we’ll see a lioness with only some cubs from her litter and some from another lioness’s then we’ll find another lioness with half of her own cubs and one cub from another litter. Who knows why they’re doing but they must have their reasons. Image of Kambula and cub by Andrew Danckwerts.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Image by Michael Liverman, December 8, 2018.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Images by deanproductions, December 8, 2018

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*This image is copyright of its original author
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Australia Herekitty Offline
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Othawa female with latest cubs sired by Ginger matimba at Ulusaba. Video by Yang Yi, December 8, 2018
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Australia Herekitty Offline
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The Othawa prince hanging out with the Mangheni cubs at Singita. Images by Rachael Cansler, December 10, 2018

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The Torchwood pride at Simbambili. Image by the Thornybush Collection, December 10, 2018

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Kambula lioness stalks an impala. Image by Marlon du Toit at Mala Mala, December 10, 2018

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Sweden Potato Offline
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( This post was last modified: 12-11-2018, 01:49 AM by Potato )

Does Nguvu has full mane already at the age of 4 or is that just a perspective of picture? Amazing youngster anyway.
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United States jordi6927 Offline
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(12-11-2018, 01:42 AM)Potato Wrote: Does Nguvu has full mane already at the age of 4 or is that just a perspective of picture? Amazing youngster anyway.

Im not trying to be hypercritical or anything ... just wanted to note that he turns 4 in Feb/19 so he is 3 yrs / 10 mths ...... which seems kind of young to have a mane that looks like it does  ... his size appears to be pretty big too
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United States Peteporker Offline
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jordi6927 Wrote:
Potato Wrote:Does Nguvu has full mane already at the age of 4 or is that just a perspective of picture? Amazing youngster anyway.

Im not trying to be hypercritical or anything ... just wanted to note that he turns 4 in Feb/19 so he is 3 yrs / 10 mths ...... which seems kind of young to have a mane that looks like it does  ... his size appears to be pretty big too

He is quite an impressive specimen. At not even 4 years old, he already has a full mane and mating with the Manghene females. He looks bigger and better than the Tsalala males!
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Australia Herekitty Offline
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Couple of Kambula/Ntsevus with some of their brood. Image by Jill Van Vogt at Mala Mala, December 11, 2018

*This image is copyright of its original author

One of the cubs with his eye on the nipple. Image by Johan Van Zyl at Londolozi, December 10, 2018

*This image is copyright of its original author

Plus a nice silhouette of one of these killer lionesses. Image by Bruce Garry at Mala Mala, December 10, 2018

*This image is copyright of its original author

By the way guys who named the Othawa male Nguvu? Sounds a bit much like baby talk for a lion prince.
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Canada Pbonz Offline
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(12-09-2018, 03:14 AM)Herekitty Wrote: Othawa female with latest cubs sired by Ginger matimba at Ulusaba. Video by Yang Yi, December 8, 2018

These cubs are very vulnerable seeing as how old the Matimbas are. I fear it won’t be long for them.
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Canada Pbonz Offline
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Does Anyone follow Andrew Deckwarts from wild eye? 
He posted an IG video of 5 cubs gone missing. 2 of which he knew where they were but they will be stranded. But then he said good news, but never said if the 5 cubs reunited. Anyone have a clue ?
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Argentina Tshokwane Offline
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(12-11-2018, 02:33 AM)jordi6927 Wrote: just wanted to note that he turns 4 in Feb/19 so he is 3 yrs / 10 mths ...... which seems kind of young to have a mane that looks like it does  ... his size appears to be pretty big too

While it's not common, at the same time it's not entirely out of the ordinary.

If he stays well fed0 and there's nos stressful situatino in his life, the sex he's getting with the Mangheni female/s plus having evidently very good mane genes, all of that makes up for the gorgeous lion he is today.
‘Like night-watchmen they patrol the dark nights; marching with intent and chasing all those unwanted into the shadows…those that do not run are removed’
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