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Lions of Sabi Sands

Greece LionKiss Offline
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#61
( This post was last modified: 01-31-2016, 10:49 PM by LionKiss )

it will be a disgrace to see the Majingilane killed by their own sons , the mapogo fans will consider it as the ultimate punishment
and what will happen with the younger cubs which in fact are their brothers and sisters and probably have the same father/mother.

what actually happens when their is big age difference between two male lions, say one is 5 years old and the other 2 or even younger?
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Argentina Tshokwane Offline
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#62

Quote:it will be a disgrace to see the Majingilane killed by their own sons
It's a natural thing for it to happen, you can see it with tigers, for example. With them, tough, I don't think it will happen.

Quote:what actually happens when their is big age difference between two male lions, say one is 5 years old and the other 2 or even younger?
It depends a lot on the circumstances where they meet each other. Are both group of males, loners without a coalition? In that case, they may join up.
Is the older male from a coalition and he encounters a young male? Then here you can expect the younger male to be chased away. Lions don't tolerate what they see as competition.
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United Kingdom Lionfan97 Offline
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#63

Do male lions have paternal instincts so for example if they see one of their fully grown male lions sons being attacked by an unknown would they protect him
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United Kingdom Lionfan97 Offline
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#64

I also was wondering when a lion encounters another lion from another pride who is his half brother, do they know they are related.
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Spalea Offline
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#65

(02-01-2016, 01:11 AM)Lionfan97 Wrote: I also was wondering when a lion encounters another lion from another pride who is his half brother, do they know they are related.

IMO They can guess they are brother or half brother. They can remind the body odours, personnal postures and attitudes. But brotherhood doesn't perhaps represent very much for them.
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Argentina Tshokwane Offline
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#66

Quote:I also was wondering when a lion encounters another lion from another pride who is his half brother, do they know they are related.
It depends a lot on the circumstances. For example, some months ago the Othawa and Mhangeni prides had an encounter. The females are half-sisters, daughters of the Mapogo males, but being of separate prides they see each other as enemies. 
Likewise, you saw Sanjay's post about the conflict between the Marthly/Tsalala and the Mhangeni prides. The Mhangeni lionesses were born in the Tsalala pride and they left the pride. So now, both prides are enemies, despite being related.

For males, it's the same. If they grew up together in the same pride then they see each other as brothers and would fight other males, like it happened between the Fourways male and the two Styx males, the three of them being Majingilane sons.
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Greece LionKiss Offline
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#67

so it all depends who they grew up with, even if they are not blood brothers/sisters they can form prides/coalitions together.
the opposite does not apply always.
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United Kingdom Lionfan97 Offline
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#68

When young male lions leave the pride to fend for themselves so they bump into their fathers/mothers if so how would they be greeted.
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Argentina Tshokwane Offline
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#69

Quote:When young male lions leave the pride to fend for themselves so they bump into their fathers/mothers if so how would they be greeted.
The fathers chase them away. Usually the females, mothers and aunts, are a bit more accepting, especially if they don't have young cubs. If they do, then I would expect the females to be more agressive, to be on guard.
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Argentina Tshokwane Offline
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#70

Lion Sands Game Reserve:
The ultimate profile picture!

We were recently graced by the presence of the Styx male lions from the northern sector of the Sabi Sand Reserve.
(Image by Field Guide Anthony Hattingh)

*This image is copyright of its original author

Great to see this boys, sons of the Majingilane males, again.
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Greece LionKiss Offline
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#71

I was wondering if someone could make a map of the where abouts of each Pride and Coalition in SS.
Is it too difficult?
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Greece LionKiss Offline
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#72

@Majingilane

could you re upload the missing photos of post #28 here:

http://wildfact.com/forum/topic-lions-of-sabi-sands?page=2
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Argentina Tshokwane Offline
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#73

Quote:could you re upload the missing photos of post #28 here
I could, I have those pics. The problem is that I don't really remember which pics I put there.
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Italy Ngala Offline
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#74

There are news about Othawa T and Othawa M after they enter in the KNP?
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Argentina Tshokwane Offline
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#75

Quote:There are news about Othawa T and Othawa M after they enter in the KNP?
No, not that I'm aware of.
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