There is a world somewhere between reality and fiction. Although ignored by many, it is very real and so are those living in it. This forum is about the natural world. Here, wild animals will be heard and respected. The forum offers a glimpse into an unknown world as well as a room with a view on the present and the future. Anyone able to speak on behalf of those living in the emerald forest and the deep blue sea is invited to join.
--- Peter Broekhuijsen ---

  • 8 Vote(s) - 4.5 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Lions of Sabi Sands

United States Pckts Offline
Bigcat Enthusiast
******

(05-05-2016, 10:40 AM)LionKiss Wrote: I believe humans should intervene and help animals no matter how the injury has been inflicted.
I like the Mara vets who took care of Siena's grave injury and save her life back in April 2014

If we are to adopt this mindset than you will no longer have "survival of the fittest" and that would go against everything nature is built on. You also would open pandora's box, meaning where do we draw the line?

Shall we now intervene when a new coalition takes over because we don't want to see the cubs of the old coalition killed? Shall we intervene when a well known buffalo or hippo or other prey species gets injured and take away that food from the hunters who did it?
If that lion were to die, do you think it would be in vain?
I certainly don't, his carcass would feed numerous species, his place would be taken by a new male that will bring in a new lineage, this is the way of the world...
The circle of life.
5 users Like Pckts's post
Reply

Greece LionKiss Offline
Regular Member
***

Lions is a different story, it is a good idea to save the cubs before a takeover if there is a plan.
only for lions
3 users Like LionKiss's post
Reply

United States Pckts Offline
Bigcat Enthusiast
******

Why only for lions?

If we were to save the cubs then what, put them in captivity?
You can't implant them in a different pride and who knows, may be some cubs make it, may be they don't but that is the way of the wild.
3 users Like Pckts's post
Reply

United Kingdom Spalea Offline
Wildanimal Lover
******

I'm agree with PCKTS. I know, the nature is cruel, this is hard to watch the daily life in wild. But if we want to learn from the wild beasts we have to be only witness. Why would we help only the lions and not an other endangered specy ? In the best case animals need only one thing: our absence, our total lack. By watching them, we influence already the animals, which knowing being observed can modify their usual behaviours.
4 users Like Spalea's post
Reply

Greece LionKiss Offline
Regular Member
***

Lions are  very special animal and deserves our special attention and intervention.

you can relocate the cubs and a lioness and leave the other lionesses to mate with the new dominant males, if you take them 15 km away you give them the opportunity to survive from that particular moment
5 users Like LionKiss's post
Reply

United States Pckts Offline
Bigcat Enthusiast
******

(05-06-2016, 12:52 AM)LionKiss Wrote: Lions are  very special animal and deserves our special attention and intervention.

you can relocate the cubs and a lioness and leave the other lionesses to mate with the new dominant males, if you take them 15 km away you give them the opportunity to survive from that particular moment

Relocate to where?

Prides don't work like that.
They will kill her and her cubs, she will have no pride to protect them while she goes on hunts, the terrain, prides territory, prey species all will be foreign to her.

And honestly, no animal is more or less special.
They are all part of a larger eco system that needs each and every one of them to play their role.
5 users Like Pckts's post
Reply

Greece LionKiss Offline
Regular Member
***

to Kruger, you can take the cubs and one lioness there. One lioness will take care of them.
the other lionesses stay behind to mate with the new males.

No, not all animals are they same as not all humans are the same, or equal.
4 users Like LionKiss's post
Reply

Roflcopters Offline
Modern Tiger Expert
*****

(05-02-2016, 11:25 PM)Majingilane Wrote: One of the Talamati males had a buffalo kill in malamala this morning and had an epic interaction with 20+ hyenas over the kill.

Pic credits to Malamala ranger Matt Meyer.

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author

Short video of the interaction, click on it to play.



He's going to teach them bitches soon enough who's the real boss around...

Do you know what happened next? the video sent chills down my spine.
5 users Like Roflcopters's post
Reply

Argentina Tshokwane Away
Big Cats Enthusiast
******

Quote:Do you know what happened next? the video sent chills down my spine.
Yes, Mala Mala posted an article about it, called A morning of madness

The lion, probably realizing that his time at the dinner table was soon to expire, proceeded to ignore the madness around him and gorge himself. The excited mob moved in as the buffalo drew it’s last breath. The braver the hyenas became, the closer they got and soon half a dozen of them were beginning to take bites at the lion’s tail and rear end. Every now and then the lion would turn around with a disgruntled growl and charge at the hyenas before returning to feed.

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author

The pestering soon got worse and one hyena actually bit off half of the tuft at the end of the lions tail! Enough was enough; the lion surrendered the carcass and moved off and the hyenas ran in.

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author

And here's the answer to your question  @Roflcopters
As it was now the hyenas turn to feast, their time at the dinner table ended in stark contrast to the manner in which they attained the meal. The two Matshapiri male lions came barging in from the east and the hyenas ran for the hills. And that was that, the two large male lions claimed the carcass and fed off it unhindered.

Here's a longer version of the video and at the end of it you can see the hyenas vanishing when they notice the adult males coming in.



7 users Like Tshokwane's post
Reply

Singapore Skybed Offline
Regular Member
***

(05-05-2016, 09:20 PM)Pckts Wrote:
(05-05-2016, 10:40 AM)LionKiss Wrote: I believe humans should intervene and help animals no matter how the injury has been inflicted.
I like the Mara vets who took care of Siena's grave injury and save her life back in April 2014

If we are to adopt this mindset than you will no longer have "survival of the fittest" and that would go against everything nature is built on. You also would open pandora's box, meaning where do we draw the line?

Shall we now intervene when a new coalition takes over because we don't want to see the cubs of the old coalition killed? Shall we intervene when a well known buffalo or hippo or other prey species gets injured and take away that food from the hunters who did it?
If that lion were to die, do you think it would be in vain?
I certainly don't, his carcass would feed numerous species, his place would be taken by a new male that will bring in a new lineage, this is the way of the world...
The circle of life.

@Pckts

yes bro i couldn't agree with you more. Letting nature take it's own course is the right thing to do. One recent example is when Blackie of the 4km Males being badly mauled by the Three Musketters. In my opinion, i feel that if the vets didn't intervane, Blackie's chances of survival is quite slim and the whole lion dynamics in the area would be very different.
5 users Like Skybed's post
Reply

Argentina Tshokwane Away
Big Cats Enthusiast
******
( This post was last modified: 05-10-2016, 12:55 AM by Tshokwane )

Heirs of the Kingdom...

Tsalala young males, credits to E.p Rangers and Mike Brown Photography.

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author
6 users Like Tshokwane's post
Reply

Italy Ngala Offline
Wildanimal Enthusiast
*****

Tsalala young males are the sons of Majingilane?
3 users Like Ngala's post
Reply

Argentina Tshokwane Away
Big Cats Enthusiast
******

Quote:Tsalala young males are the sons of Majingilane?
Yes, exactly. I think they're around 2 1/2 years old.

This one is another of their sons, one of the Sparta young males, seen to the south of the Sabi sands, apparently his brother was also there but shy. They have a reason to be nervous, they're in the Charleston males land.
Pic credits to Eckson Sithole.

*This image is copyright of its original author
7 users Like Tshokwane's post
Reply

Italy Ngala Offline
Wildanimal Enthusiast
*****

Thanks for the info Majingilane. But now in Sabi Sands, what are the young males, sons of the current adult males present?

3 Talamati males sons of Matimba males
2 Sparta males sons of Majingilane males
3? Tsalala males sons of Majingilane males
5 Eastern Bank males sons of Toulon males (KNP sometimes sight in Sabi Sands)

Others young males?
6 users Like Ngala's post
Reply

Argentina Tshokwane Away
Big Cats Enthusiast
******

I would add the 3 Mhangeni(Tsalala breakaway) males, also sons of the Majingilane.

Also the Styx males, who are around the age of the Charleston males, maybe a bit younger.

And also the young Nkuhuma male, Junior, son of the Matimbas.
7 users Like Tshokwane's post
Reply






Users browsing this thread:
7 Guest(s)

About Us
Go Social     Subscribe  

Welcome to WILDFACT forum, a website that focuses on sharing the joy that wildlife has on offer. We welcome all wildlife lovers to join us in sharing that joy. As a member you can share your research, knowledge and experience on animals with the community.
wildfact.com is intended to serve as an online resource for wildlife lovers of all skill levels from beginners to professionals and from all fields that belong to wildlife anyhow. Our focus area is wild animals from all over world. Content generated here will help showcase the work of wildlife experts and lovers to the world. We believe by the help of your informative article and content we will succeed to educate the world, how these beautiful animals are important to survival of all man kind.
Many thanks for visiting wildfact.com. We hope you will keep visiting wildfact regularly and will refer other members who have passion for wildlife.

Forum software by © MyBB