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Lions in South-Africa, Zimbabwe and Namibia

Guatemala GuateGojira Offline
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#46

From the data that I have, South African lions are the largest of the lions. They surpass (bit a little bit) they brothers of the south west and definitely are larger than the East African lions.

The heaviest white lion in South Africa that I know in these days is a male of 250 kg, very stocky but not taller than 100 cm at the shoulder. He looks like a big tiger, but with a mane. Lol


I forgot his name right not, but I am going to search a few pictures from him.
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United States GrizzlyClaws Offline
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#47
( This post was last modified: 10-03-2015, 10:37 AM by GrizzlyClaws )

(10-03-2015, 10:03 AM)GuateGojira Wrote: From the data that I have, South African lions are the largest of the lions. They surpass (bit a little bit) they brothers of the south west and definitely are larger than the East African lions.

The heaviest white lion in South Africa that I know in these days is a male of 250 kg, very stocky but not taller than 100 cm at the shoulder. He looks like a big tiger, but with a mane. Lol


I forgot his name right not, but I am going to search a few pictures from him.

But the largest fang came from the Southwest Africa.

Southwest Africa: 6 cm
Southeast Africa: 5.6 cm
East Africa: 5.8 cm
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Argentina Tshokwane Offline
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#48

Mabande and Ximpoko, Photo taken by Christof Schoeman.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Mabande's first coalition partner was called Ximpoko. He was the biggest male in the Timbavati without a doubt. He was killed by trophy hunters in July 2013. After Ximpoko's death Mabande formed a coalition in 2014 with a male called the Birmingham male.

*This image is copyright of its original author


To this day, Mabande is still alive.

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


Quote:Are you able to get to some conclusions on coalitions? Are there regional differences in size and behaviour? Why is it some coalitions left total destruction? Anything known as to factors that affect behaviour?

Hi @peter , thanks for sharing that account with us.
To be fair, I'm still very limited in the amount of knowledge aboout lions from other places. But I'll try to answer your question from what I do know.
From both the Kruger/Sabi sands and the Serengeti/Masai mara I've read about big coalitions( 4 or more males). From other places, not so much, but rather dual coalitions and the occasional trio of males.
I'm not sure if this is related to how plentiful the land is, the amount of prey available or simply how successful the local prides are(I always refer to the female grouping as prides;Never liked to say "pride males").
About the agression of the coalitions, I think it depends a lot on the individuals(maybe some have more testoterone than others and that reflects more than in just how big the mane is). What I'm sure is that it is more pronounced in the initial stages of a take over, because the males need to reinforce their dominance in the land they conquer and also force the females to accept them as dominant males. 
One more thing I've noticed is that in the Serengeti/Masai mara area, successful coalitions like the Notch males constantly expand their territories and in doing so they lose interest in the land and prides they conquered initially. This of course menas that those prides will be left vulnerable to the threat of new males and the cubs they sired may die. But it's like they need to constantly have more and more.
To draw a parallel picture, in the Sabi sands this expanding is also seen, coalitions have lost interest in some prides and moved to conquer another, but I don't see this constant moving from one territory to another. They stay for longer periods of time in one big place they conquer and dominate and then, maybe when cubs grow up and become sub-adults ready to become independent then the coalition will try to look out for another pride. This also may be a response to the pressure another large or younger coalitions puts them, so they move a little bit to avoid conflict with said rival coalition, something very alike with what you see with dominant leopards and tigers.
For now, this are some of the things I've noticed, I hope it helps.
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Netherlands peter Offline
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#49
( This post was last modified: 10-03-2015, 11:04 PM by peter )

Interesting observations, Majingilane.

Based on what I read, I concluded the south has more big coalitions (four or more males) than elsewhere. They also seem to act in a more violent way, leaving a trail of destruction at times. Furthermore, males stay longer with the pride, thus offering more protection to the youngsters they sired. Could it be these traits are connected to a more sedentary way of life? Building cities and defending them? 

In eastern parts of Africa, males seem more nomadic. Maybe they adapted to the ever moving big herds? This would result in more flexible territories, but also in more fights. Not severe in most cases, but definitely different in hotspots. They have hotspots in eastern parts of Africa and these are much contested. In turf wars, males at times deliberately target adult females. It is about the total number of adults.  

I also noticed skulls of male lions living in the south, although a bit longer than elsewhere (averages), do not seem as robust (referring to zygomatic width and the rostrum). This, however, could be a result of the length. One needs to see many skulls to get to a conclusion, but it was, to a degree, confirmed in the skulls of wild males I measured.   

Next week, the BBC will broadcast the great documentary 'The truth about lions'. Two parts and both very interesting. I posted on them and would definitely advice to watch them if you can.
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United States GrizzlyClaws Offline
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#50

That's why I believe the Lion King was based on the life style of the Serengeti lions.

Often with one big male in charge of the whole pride, whereas the southern lions have multiple male lions within the pride, and they also act like gangster.

Different lions may have different cultures, this is really fascinating.
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Italy Spalea Offline
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#51

Prides of the serengeti and East Africa lions would be more stable than these of the South Africa. Thus perhaps more secure as concerns the cubs and the females which take care of them and hunt ? With, paradoxically, no more than two males within the pride ? Because being in small number they cannot act in "gang".

But yes, this is really fascinating.
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United States GrizzlyClaws Offline
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#52
( This post was last modified: 10-03-2015, 11:53 PM by GrizzlyClaws )

The Serengeti lionesses are strict hunters, and they rarely engage into the pride rivalry.

And the behavior of the Serengeti lionesses is my traditional perception about the lioness behavior.

But watching the live documentary about those South African prides posted by @Majingilane, it does really change my perception about those lionesses. They also act like female gangsters who engage into the pride rivalry, and often I see some lionesses got killed by the male lions from the rival pride. And these behaviors are quite unorthodox for the Serengeti prides, but it can often be seen among the southern lions.
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Argentina Tshokwane Offline
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#53

Wilderness Safaris:
Linkwasha guide Sam Mushandu (remember his adorable photos of Cecil's grand-cubs?) reports on the latest thrilling developments in the life of Cecil's son, Xanda.


"It's official, Xanda has now reclaimed his father's former territory. Cecil spent nine years of his life around Linkwasha and after careful observation we are now certain that Xanda has claimed back his heritage. I observed him three days ago just 2 km from Linkwasha in the the company of three lionesses. He was walking along the road confidently marking his territory. Xanda is easily identified by the big scar on his nose… he has clearly survived an intense battle!
For the last two nights Xanda has been calling a lot around Linkwasha, advertising his presence. He was also recorded mating with one of the three females. Which means we're keeping a very close eye on the lionesses as there there might be more grand cubs soon!"
Pics by Sam Mushandu

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author
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United Kingdom Roflcopters Offline
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#54

Carrying Daddys legacy, what a magnaficient male lion! I like how he stands out from most of the dark maned lions. Thanks for sharing Majingilane.
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Canada Dr Panthera Offline
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#55

(05-07-2014, 07:46 PM)TheLioness Wrote: http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&...Krsfozz7lA

Weights are different between north and south kruger lions.


Adult females south 118.37kg vs north 143.52kg.
Adult males south 186.55kg vs north 200.01kg.

 

Dr Dewalt Kleet ( a veterinarian) and Dr Funston a biologist participated with others in a workshop about bovine tuberculosis in the Kruger lions. It is a great read if you have medical background and have the time to read the 85 page document.
Healthy adult lions ( 4-8 years of age) from the north sector ( north of the Oliphant river) weighed 200 kg for males and 143.5 kg for females ( total 16 animals)...the north sectors have less prey than south but there is less infections of tuberculosis and despite that the northern lions weighed more than the healthy southern lions males 186.6 kg and females 118.4 kg ( total 11 animals).
Male to female ratio was 1:1.75 in the north but 1:1 in the south, the abundance of young male lions in the south created larger coalitions.
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Canada Dr Panthera Offline
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#56

(05-16-2014, 06:41 PM)TheLioness Wrote:
Kingtheropod\ dateline='\'1400222881' Wrote:
TheLioness\ dateline='\'1400083123' Wrote: I got a reply back it weights from the smaller lion population in southern kruger. These lions were infected with turberculosis, the results of being infected are weight loss, swollen joints, lameness, poorly healing, skin wounds and depression.

The average weight I got out of all the animals, males - 170kg and females 115kg. There was also shoulder heights. I have asked a few questions and hope to get another reply.

Almost 90% of lions in kruger national park have this illness, they loose so much weight in such a short period of time they are prone to illnesses such as F1 virus in which causes high mortality rates.


*This image is copyright of its original author


I have the email if anyone needs further proof.
 

 

Hi lioness

I was wondering if you can show a copy paste (screen shot) of the exact email, for referencing reasons
*This image is copyright of its original author


Then I had asked about adjusted for weight content, which ones were infected, and if they come across anymore weights feel free to share. Got a reply back, said pleasure, once he takes another look at the data.
 

All of these were sick lions and that was their weight at death ( Roy Binge, veterinarian Kruger Park) compare it with the healthy lions sample from both north and south of the Oliphant river and you can see the devastating effect of bovine tuberculosis.
Interestingly bovine TB is not even endemic to Africa, domestic cattle imported from Europe brought the disease to the vicinity of the Crocodile river in southern Kruger in the early 60's, it infected the first Kruger lions by 1990 and moved northward all the way to the Limpopo river by 2006 covering the entire KNP in 16 years.
Kruger male lions are proficient buffalo killers with up to 73% of kills by nomadic lions and 59% of kills by territorial lions being cape buffalo (Funston) so they are more at risk than lionesses and TB infections continue to be a major cause of mortality.
Bovine TB also affects leopards, cheetahs, spotted hyenas, wild dogs, spotted genets, chacma baboons, and several ungulate species.
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Greece LionKiss Offline
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#57

does some kind of vacine prevents TB infections?
how can be treated once the lion gets infected?
is it possible humans to protect lions from this disease?
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Greece LionKiss Offline
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#58

a Lioness with mane, what does it mean? hermaphrodite?

http://www.care2.com/causes/meet-the-amazing-lioness-wholl-make-you-believe-shes-a-male.html?cid=fb_Causes_LionnessWithMane&src=Causes_fb&campaign=LionnessWithMane
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Argentina Tshokwane Offline
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#59

You have the answer in the very same link:
Ph.D. candidate Simon Dures told Africa Geographic that Mmamoriri’s physical characteristics are probably the result of exposure while in the womb to an excess of androgens. Androgens are hormones which stimulate the development of male characteristics — particularly primary and secondary sex characteristics. This phenomenon is well-documented in humans, but is less common in animals.
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Greece LionKiss Offline
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#60

this is a known and sad story of a young lion killed while trying to get a buffalo down to feed.

even when dying (the last photo) he has an immense beauty in his eyes.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-...uries.html
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