There is a world somewhere between reality and fiction. Although ignored by many, it is very real and so are those living in it. This forum is about the natural world. Here, wild animals will be heard and respected. The forum offers a glimpse into an unknown world as well as a room with a view on the present and the future. Anyone able to speak on behalf of those living in the emerald forest and the deep blue sea is invited to join.
--- Peter Broekhuijsen ---

  • 1 Vote(s) - 2 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Lions in South-Africa, Zimbabwe and Namibia

Sanju Offline
Senior member
*****
( This post was last modified: 02-04-2019, 08:55 PM by Sanju )

Beach lions again hunting seals and coastal birds in Namibia, after 35 years
Posted on 29 January, 2019 by Africa Geographic Editorial  in Destinations, Namibia, Research, Wildlife and the Decoding Science post series.
Posted: January 29, 2019
 

*This image is copyright of its original author

Lioness with a Cape fur seal © PE Stander / Desert Lion Conservation

Quote:Research by respected scientist P.E. Stander reveals that the desert-adapted lions eking out a living on the harsh northwest coast of Namibia’s Skeleton Coast National Park (SCNP) are again specialising in hunting seals and coastal birds such as flamingos and cormorants, after an absence of 35 years.

They have also been seen feeding ON BROWN HYENAS and beached pilot whale carcasses.

*This image is copyright of its original author

The study area in the northwest of Namibia that includes the Skeleton Coast National Park, several tourism concessions and communal conservancies © PE Stander/Desert Lion Conservation

Lions disappeared from this hostile, remote coast during the 1980s due to intense human-lion conflict, but since 2002 have gradually re-colonised the area after a successful community-based conservancy model was implemented, and the growth of tourism in the area.

*This image is copyright of its original author

A lioness on the lookout for prey along the coastline © PE Stander / Desert Lion Conservation

These lions have only recently, after a period of 35 years, again started to utilise the rich marine resources, with as much as 79% of their diet in the past 18 months consisting of seals and birds.

*This image is copyright of its original author

The number of recorded prey species killed and the estimated biomass consumed by the Hoanib Floodplain pride in the Skeleton Coast National Park, between May 2017 and November 2018 © PE Stander / Desert Lion Conservation


Quote:The last SCNP lions were killed off by 1990, shot or poisoned by livestock farmers on the fringes of this narrow national park. Then, in 1997, a group of 20 desert-adapted lions was discovered in the mountainous eastern edge of the Namib Desert.


*This image is copyright of its original author

Lioness feeding on Cape fur seal © PE Stander / Desert Lion Conservation

*This image is copyright of its original author

Left: The home range area and movements of the Uniab/Obab pride in relation to the coastal habitat at the Uniab Delta (blue area) between January and November 2015; Right[b]: The home range area and movements of the Hoanib Floodplain pride in relation to the coastal habitat around the mouth of the Hoanib River (yellow area) between August 2014 and November 2015; © PE Stander / Desert Lion Conservation[/b]

The population has since gradually recovered, thanks to periods of good rains, a growing Namibian tourism industry and a successful program to generate benefits for local communities from the tourism industry, although it is still beset with issues relating to human-wildlife conflict and trophy hunting.

Quote:
*This image is copyright of its original author

Lion killed in the Etosha area. ©Namibian Sun


*This image is copyright of its original author

The home range sizes, the proportion of coastal habitat in each home range and the duration of monitoring of five lion prides in northwest Namibia © PE Stander / Desert Lion Conservation

During the poor 2017 rainfall period, lions living inland of the coastal area started visiting the coastal area to utilise the marine resources.

Three young lionesses, orphaned at the age of less than one year when their mother died of natural causes, found their way across the dunes to an island in a fresh-water spring on the coast, and survived by hunting cormorants, flamingos and teals. They then moved on to scavenging off seal carcasses, and then to hunting and killing juvenile and then adult seals.

Please download this report and invest your time in reading it. Keep the passion.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Hunting cormorants at Hoanib Lagoon © PE Stander / Desert Lion Conservation

Stander, P. (2019). Lions (Panthera leo) specialising on a marine diet in the Skeleton Coast Park, Namibia. Namibian Journal Of Environment, 3, Section A, 1-10. Retrieved from https://www.nje.org.na/index.php/nje/article/view/volume3-stander

https://africageographic.com/blog/beach-...-35-years/
8 users Like Sanju's post
Reply

Sanju Offline
Senior member
*****
( This post was last modified: 02-12-2019, 01:59 PM by Sanju )




(click to play the video)

Moditlo Private Game Reserve
17 hrs
Last night on Moditlo at the main gate exit

This happens only in Africa (and India). LOL.
3 users Like Sanju's post
Reply

United States Pckts Offline
Bigcat Enthusiast
******

Swipe Left
4 users Like Pckts's post
Reply

United States Styx38 Offline
Banned
( This post was last modified: 08-19-2019, 10:47 AM by Styx38 )

Miles (Xpl-16)

A male Hoanib Lion



*This image is copyright of its original author




*This image is copyright of its original author




*This image is copyright of its original author




*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author




The Bull Giraffe that he killed:



*This image is copyright of its original author




"I decided to fit this collar to an adult male lion, named Miles (Xpl-16) that lives in the Ugab River. It was a daunting task because he moves over an enormous area of 16,000 sqr km, and the last time I darted him on 24 June 2007 he attacked my vehicle and shredded three tires (see News 2007). After searching the area for four days I finally tracked him down in the lower Ugab River, where he had killed a giraffe bull."


https://web.archive.org/web/20081212195202/http://www.desertlion.info/news08a.html
4 users Like Styx38's post
Reply

Oman Lycaon Offline
أسد الأطلس
*****
Moderators

Cape Lion in the Hagenbeck zoo 


*This image is copyright of its original author


Source: https://www.zootierliste.de/?klasse=1&ordnung=115&familie=11508&art=50902723
3 users Like Lycaon's post
Reply

United Kingdom Spalea Online
Wildanimal Lover
******

Other links:

1) The facts:

https://www.thoughtco.com/cape-lion-1093061

2) a small doubt: " It may be that the Cape lion was only the southernmost population of the extant transvall lion.   ":

https://animals.fandom.com/wiki/Cape_Lion
2 users Like Spalea's post
Reply

BorneanTiger Offline
Contributor
*****

(08-25-2019, 07:44 PM)Spalea Wrote: Other links:

1) The facts:

https://www.thoughtco.com/cape-lion-1093061

2) a small doubt: " It may be that the Cape lion was only the southernmost population of the extant transvall lion.   ":

https://animals.fandom.com/wiki/Cape_Lion

More accurately, the southernmost population of the Southern lion subspecies (Panthera leo melanochaita) which occurs in Southern and Southeastern Africa, and would include the Kruger or Transvaal lion (formerly Panthera leo krugeri) pages 71–73: https://repository.si.edu/bitstream/hand...=y#page=71
2 users Like BorneanTiger's post
Reply

BorneanTiger Offline
Contributor
*****
( This post was last modified: 03-28-2020, 10:58 PM by BorneanTiger )

(08-25-2019, 06:21 PM)Lycaon Wrote: Cape Lion in the Hagenbeck zoo 


*This image is copyright of its original author


Source: https://www.zootierliste.de/?klasse=1&ordnung=115&familie=11508&art=50902723

Interesting, because as I mentioned here, Hagenbeck Zoo in Germany had a Caspian tigress from Iran in the 20th century, expressing my disappointment about zoos apparently having say Barbary and Cape lions, or at least their descendants, but not Caspian tigers. Upon further research, I discovered that Hagenbeck Zoo was founded by a man of the same name who imported exotic animals (like his father Carl Hagenbeck Senior), including Barbary, NubianCape and Senegal lions (previously used to refer to regular lions of Sub-Saharan Africa), besides Amur, Bengal, Indochinese and Sumatran tigers.

Hagenbeck Zoo in 1904: https://mohistory.org/collections/item/resource:148744

*This image is copyright of its original author
2 users Like BorneanTiger's post
Reply

Oman Lycaon Offline
أسد الأطلس
*****
Moderators

@BorneanTiger 

Nice find.
1 user Likes Lycaon's post
Reply

United Kingdom Spalea Online
Wildanimal Lover
******

Yawning when the night is falling... Beautiful !

1 user Likes Spalea's post
Reply

United Kingdom Spalea Online
Wildanimal Lover
******

Kruger National Park.

3 users Like Spalea's post
Reply

United Kingdom Spalea Online
Wildanimal Lover
******

Shots from the Kruger National Park...







3 users Like Spalea's post
Reply

United Kingdom Spalea Online
Wildanimal Lover
******

Zimanga Private Game Reserve, South Africa... Father and son.

3 users Like Spalea's post
Reply

lionjaguar Offline
Banned

I am surprised to see photos of the Cape lion.
2 users Like lionjaguar's post
Reply

United Kingdom Spalea Online
Wildanimal Lover
******

A quiet young male already beautiful... Namibia's Hoanib River.

4 users Like Spalea's post
Reply






Users browsing this thread:
1 Guest(s)

About Us
Go Social     Subscribe  

Welcome to WILDFACT forum, a website that focuses on sharing the joy that wildlife has on offer. We welcome all wildlife lovers to join us in sharing that joy. As a member you can share your research, knowledge and experience on animals with the community.
wildfact.com is intended to serve as an online resource for wildlife lovers of all skill levels from beginners to professionals and from all fields that belong to wildlife anyhow. Our focus area is wild animals from all over world. Content generated here will help showcase the work of wildlife experts and lovers to the world. We believe by the help of your informative article and content we will succeed to educate the world, how these beautiful animals are important to survival of all man kind.
Many thanks for visiting wildfact.com. We hope you will keep visiting wildfact regularly and will refer other members who have passion for wildlife.

Forum software by © MyBB