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Lion Predation

United Kingdom Genghis Offline
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Male lion attacking a big buffalo:


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Male lions attacking young juvenile hippo:


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Epic picture:


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Male lion decides to pose and show off for the camera: (Lion looks very cute) loool


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And then gets back to business:


*This image is copyright of its original author
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United States ShereKhan Offline
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"Hey, get my good side! Got it...? OK."  - om nom nom
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Rage2277 Offline
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( This post was last modified: 08-06-2018, 08:06 PM by Rage2277 )

 
" target="_blank">
 lion attacks buffalo cow
"ssshhh...listen to the rain"...
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India Rishi Online
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( This post was last modified: 08-07-2018, 11:04 AM by Rishi )

(08-06-2018, 01:28 PM)Shir Babr Wrote: I looked for more videos and images of the hamstring technique and also talked about it with a zoologist. My conclusion is that the main purpose of this method of attack is to avoid the prey defenses and destabilize it, not to damage the hamstrings in particular. When targeting the rump, felines bite mostly with their canines; teeth that are made for stabbing and holding, not cutting, so if the main goal was to sever the hamstrings to make the legs give in, using the sharp carnassials would be a better choice for the job. Sometimes you can see they're biting the base of the tail or farther up, so the spine is a target, as in the image bellow. But what probably makes the victim fall is a combination of fatigue from the struggle, the attacker's weight and the loss of balance (combination that might cause shock, blood loss don't seems an issue), not the damage to the muscles or tendons, as evidenced by how many prey fall before the muscles are seriously injured or how such injuries sometimes never even take place during the process. And it seems many buffaloes escape from such attacks without suffering limps or being crippled. But of course, crippling muscle or tendon damage can be possible too, but not as a rule.

In the video from post #1,190, the gaur is already immobilized when the tigress is eating it alive, the gaur doesn't seem to be in pain, as in this other example in 2:19, which means that both animals were in shock or even suffered spinal damage.




 

Yes, your observations were made by me too. I too had noticed that buffaloes often run away without any noticeable limp. I don't think African lions adopt it often, because they are more prone to wrestling down the animal using numbers & weight. Thus the mounting, tail pulling etc. Except when they're doing it alone (Eaten Alive), but the term is somewhat common in India for both tigers & lions.

Now, they might not be doing it deliberately. Chances are that lone hunters just holds on to the rump of much larger prey & starts chewing out of instinct, while the animal succumbs of collective effect of exhaustion, trauma, blood loss, nerve & muscle damage...like you said.
The name is just something coined by us.

But there are three footages of (lone) asiatic lionesses taking down 500kg+ animals available, and all three are way too similar. 

Male nilgai:



Feral camel (two adults, rest were youngsters who barely participated):



Buffalo (can't find the full video right now):




I don't think all of them were already immobilised though. The nilgai certainly wasn't, but was pulled back down almost too effortlessly. There's another footage of gaur hunts by tigresses in the Tiger Predation thread, look for it. The tigress had walked off leaving the young gaur to her cub/s. I doubt she'd have done that if she weren't 100% certain of the gaur being crippled...as far as looking to be in pain is concerned, their faces just don't have that many muscles for expression.
"Everything not saved will be lost."

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Mexico Shir Babr Offline
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( This post was last modified: 08-07-2018, 08:15 AM by Shir Babr )

(08-06-2018, 04:01 PM)Rishi Wrote:
(07-30-2018, 07:48 AM)Rage2277 Wrote: https://www.instagram.com/p/Bl00J7aH9II/...atgeowild7 lion attacks buffalo cow

Dude, just write [insta]...[/insta] on both sides of the link & it'd be embedded here. [tweet]...[/tweet] for Twitter posts.

(08-06-2018, 01:28 PM)Shir Babr Wrote: I looked for more videos and images of the hamstring technique and also talked about it with a zoologist. My conclusion is that the main purpose of this method of attack is to avoid the prey defenses and destabilize it, not to damage the hamstrings in particular. When targeting the rump, felines bite mostly with their canines; teeth that are made for stabbing and holding, not cutting, so if the main goal was to sever the hamstrings to make the legs give in, using the sharp carnassials would be a better choice for the job. Sometimes you can see they're biting the base of the tail or farther up, so the spine is a target, as in the image bellow. But what probably makes the victim fall is a combination of fatigue from the struggle, the attacker's weight and the loss of balance (combination that might cause shock, blood loss don't seems an issue), not the damage to the muscles or tendons, as evidenced by how many prey fall before the muscles are seriously injured or how such injuries sometimes never even take place during the process. And it seems many buffaloes escape from such attacks without suffering limps or being crippled. But of course, crippling muscle or tendon damage can be possible too, but not as a rule.

In the video from post #1,190, the gaur is already immobilized when the tigress is eating it alive, the gaur doesn't seem to be in pain, as in this other example in 2:19, which means that both animals were in shock or even suffered spinal damage.




 

Yes, your observations were made by me too. I too had noticed that buffaloes often run away without any noticeable limp. I don't think African lions adopt it often, because they are more prone to wrestling down the animal using numbers & weight. Thus the mounting, tail pulling etc. Except when they're doing it alone (Eaten Alive), but the term is somewhat common in India for both tigers & lions.

Now, they might not be doing it deliberately. Chances are that lone hunters just holds on to the rump of much larger prey & starts chewing out of instinct, while the animal succumbs of collective effect of exhaustion, trauma, blood loss, nerve & muscle damage...like you said.
The name is just something coined by us.

But there are three footages of (lone) asiatic lionesses taking down 500kg+ animals available, and all three are way too similar. 

Male nilgai:



Feral camel (two adults, rest were youngsters who barely participated):



Buffalo (can't find the full video right now):




I don't think all of them were already immobilised though. The nilgai certainly wasn't, but was pulled back down almost too effortlessly. There's another footage of gaur hunts by tigresses in the Tiger Predation thread, look for it. The tigress had walked off leaving the young gaur to her cub/s. I doubt she'd have done that if she weren't 100% certain of the gaur being crippled...as far as looking to be in pain is concerned, their faces just don't have that many muscles for expression.

I didn't knew the term was coined by you, that would've been a good place to start :) Seems that tigers have bigger forequarters than lions to wrestle bigger prey alone. On the three videos the prey is already down, so who knows, though the nilgai was seemingly held down by the lioness grip and weight, unlike the other two that seem paralyzed. I didn't meant that their faces should be making gestures, because they can't; I meant that it seemed to be painless because they look much calmer and even stopped making vocalizations. Let's hope more photos of the rhino incident are released soon. Thanks for the explanations.
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India Rishi Online
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Tongue  ( This post was last modified: 08-07-2018, 08:45 AM by Rishi )

(08-07-2018, 08:09 AM)Shir Babr Wrote: I didn't knew the term was coined by you, that would've been a good place to start :)

Not me, i'd meant people.
It's not a secret, you know. I literally typed the word on Google Search & had atleast seven hits. How did you not find them?

www.lairweb.org.nz/hunting6.html

The Deer & the Tiger: George Schaller

An Encyclopaedia of Natural History

...cases of hamstringing by both lions & tigers...
"Everything not saved will be lost."

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Mexico Shir Babr Offline
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(08-07-2018, 08:33 AM)Rishi Wrote:
(08-07-2018, 08:09 AM)Shir Babr Wrote: I didn't knew the term was coined by you, that would've been a good place to start :)

Not me, i'd meant people.  
It's not a secret, you know. I literally typed the word on Google Search & had atleast seven hits. How did you not find them?

www.lairweb.org.nz/hunting6.html

The Deer & the Tiger: George Schaller

An Encyclopaedia of Natural History

...cases of hamstringing by both lions & tigers...

I didn't mean you yo Rishi, but you them hehe, and that it is a broad term used for hanging on the rear and not literal hamstringing. Actually, I did find the one with wolves, that seem to be a true use in the literal sense, and that one from Schaller, and noticed that not only is he the most reliable of the ones talking about tigers, but that what he had to say about the matter was what I already had in mind


*This image is copyright of its original author
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India Rishi Online
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( This post was last modified: 08-10-2018, 05:30 AM by Rishi )

(08-07-2018, 09:08 AM)Shir Babr Wrote:
(08-07-2018, 08:33 AM)Rishi Wrote: Not me, i'd meant people.  
It's not a secret, you know. I literally typed the word on Google Search & had atleast seven hits. How did you not find them?

www.lairweb.org.nz/hunting6.html

The Deer & the Tiger: George Schaller

An Encyclopaedia of Natural History

...cases of hamstringing by both lions & tigers...

I didn't mean you Rishi, but you them hehe, and that it is a broad term used for hanging on the rear and not literal hamstringing. Actually, I did find the one with wolves, that seem to be a true use in the literal sense, and that one from Schaller, and noticed that not only is he the most reliable of the ones talking about tigers, but that what he had to say about the matter was what I already had in mind


*This image is copyright of its original author

Exactly. But the term, as you can see, is used quite often. I found its origin...
Historically amongst people, victors in war used to cut the hamstring of the horses & oxen of the defeated party, making them lame. I guess, men just assumed that predators do the same thing.
"Everything not saved will be lost."

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India Rishi Online
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Old video with horrible quality.



"Everything not saved will be lost."

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United States Pckts Offline
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( This post was last modified: 08-12-2018, 09:48 AM by sanjay Edit Reason: corrected the formating )

Othawa boy earns his keep.
"Our guests were very privileged this morning to witness the #Othawa pride take down a #Kudu for breakfast. Very appropriate to showcase the strength and power of #lionson #worldlionday!"
credits to Dulini Private Game Reserve @dulinilodge, @kgalvs, posted 10 Aug 2018
Another video of the hunt: https://www.facebook.com/SavannaPrivateG...391588693/




"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
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