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Lion Predation

Finland Shadow Offline
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(05-16-2020, 06:50 PM)Spalea Wrote:
(05-16-2020, 04:58 PM)Shadow Wrote:
(05-16-2020, 04:00 PM)Spalea Wrote: @Shadow , @Rage2277 @Asad981 . Yes but keep in mind it's much more difficult to bring down an one-ton buffalo that an one-ton elephant. The farmer is a full mature alpha bull, the latter a juvenile one. Thus if you want to remind the most amazing feats by a lone lion, the prey's weight isn't the only one factor to take into account.

And as concerns the weight, the most amazing feat by a lone lion I recently saw was this one: a male lion bringing down an adult giraffe weighing 1,2 - 1,5 ton... Post #822 of this topic.


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My posting had nothing to do with buffalos. Anyway some very impressive hunts from lions what comes to elephants. Adult elephants are after all practically impossible to harm by any predator. But it´s interesting to see how old and big are still in danger if wandering around alone. Buffalos are then again another story as giraffes, all are naturally dangerous prey for obvious reasons.
I only told that the weight isn't the most significant criteria to consider a feat. Thus I am more amazed to see a lone lion killing one adult buffalo rather than a juvenile elephant which you refered to. A juvenile elephant is a hard prey to kill for anatomic reasons (thick skin...) but also a prey unable to defend by itself. By attacking a big buffalo or an adult giraffe a lone lion clearly risks its life. By hunting a juvenile elephant it only has to take its time.
But perhaps I was disturbing you by putting in perspective a lone lion killing a juvenile elephant. In this case, sorry saying that a little abruptly.

No disturbing really, I just wasn´t thinkin about buffalos. But what comes to juvenile elephants, as I wrote it´s interesting to look at those situations and see where limits are. After all a juvenile elephant  covers a lot of elephants in different ages and sizes and they can be very dangerous, they can after all kill any big cat instantly if able to stomp even once over it. You for sure remember articles about juvenile elephants killing rhinos, when there were no adult bulls in the area. I would bet, that no big cat wouldn´t dare to approach those juvenile male elephants because they were bad news. Only bigger adult bull elephant is able to get those "youngsters" in line.
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United Kingdom Borya Offline
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Male lion brings down a bull buffalo in a dangerous way


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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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(05-16-2020, 07:31 PM)Shadow Wrote:
(05-16-2020, 06:50 PM)Spalea Wrote:
(05-16-2020, 04:58 PM)Shadow Wrote:
(05-16-2020, 04:00 PM)Spalea Wrote: @Shadow , @Rage2277 @Asad981 . Yes but keep in mind it's much more difficult to bring down an one-ton buffalo that an one-ton elephant. The farmer is a full mature alpha bull, the latter a juvenile one. Thus if you want to remind the most amazing feats by a lone lion, the prey's weight isn't the only one factor to take into account.

And as concerns the weight, the most amazing feat by a lone lion I recently saw was this one: a male lion bringing down an adult giraffe weighing 1,2 - 1,5 ton... Post #822 of this topic.


*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author
My posting had nothing to do with buffalos. Anyway some very impressive hunts from lions what comes to elephants. Adult elephants are after all practically impossible to harm by any predator. But it´s interesting to see how old and big are still in danger if wandering around alone. Buffalos are then again another story as giraffes, all are naturally dangerous prey for obvious reasons.
I only told that the weight isn't the most significant criteria to consider a feat. Thus I am more amazed to see a lone lion killing one adult buffalo rather than a juvenile elephant which you refered to. A juvenile elephant is a hard prey to kill for anatomic reasons (thick skin...) but also a prey unable to defend by itself. By attacking a big buffalo or an adult giraffe a lone lion clearly risks its life. By hunting a juvenile elephant it only has to take its time.
But perhaps I was disturbing you by putting in perspective a lone lion killing a juvenile elephant. In this case, sorry saying that a little abruptly.

No disturbing really, I just wasn´t thinkin about buffalos. But what comes to juvenile elephants, as I wrote it´s interesting to look at those situations and see where limits are. After all a juvenile elephant  covers a lot of elephants in different ages and sizes and they can be very dangerous, they can after all kill any big cat instantly if able to stomp even once over it. You for sure remember articles about juvenile elephants killing rhinos, when there were no adult bulls in the area. I would bet, that no big cat wouldn´t dare to approach those juvenile male elephants because they were bad news. Only bigger adult bull elephant is able to get those "youngsters" in line.
Yes, in this case, quite agree with you, these juvenile elephants were "teenager". And much more powerful than the juvenile ones about which I was thinking by reading your comments.
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Brazil Dark Jaguar Offline
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( This post was last modified: 05-18-2020, 11:00 PM by Dark Jaguar )

https://blog.nationalgeographic.org/image-sitemap-31.xml




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LoveLions Offline
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Gore warning


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LoveLions Offline
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Two young male lions attacking an adult buffalo


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LoveLions Offline
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Male lion kills a young elephant and then stands his ground against a full grown one


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LoveLions Offline
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Male lion casually walks upto a wild dog pride, drives them off and kills the wildebeest (Btw that is my YT channel)




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LoveLions Offline
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Two young male lions kill an adult buffalo




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Venezuela Cunaguaro Offline
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(05-21-2020, 10:46 PM)LoveLions Wrote: Gore warning


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"Dark Mane" Majingilane.
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Virgin Islands, U.S. Rage2277 Offline
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"ssshhh...listen to the rain"...
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United Kingdom Sully Offline
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Do Lions [i]Panthera leo[/i] Actively Select Prey or Do Prey Preferences Simply Reflect Chance Responses via Evolutionary Adaptations to Optimal Foraging?


Abstract

Research on coursing predators has revealed that actions throughout the predatory behavioral sequence (using encounter rate, hunting rate, and kill rate as proxy measures of decisions) drive observed prey preferences. We tested whether similar actions drive the observed prey preferences of a stalking predator, the African lion [i]Panthera leo[/i]. We conducted two 96 hour, continuous follows of lions in Addo Elephant National Park seasonally from December 2003 until November 2005 (16 follows), and compared prey encounter rate with prey abundance, hunt rate with prey encounter rate, and kill rate with prey hunt rate for the major prey species in Addo using Jacobs' electivity index. We found that lions encountered preferred prey species far more frequently than expected based on their abundance, and they hunted these species more frequently than expected based on this higher encounter rate. Lions responded variably to non-preferred and avoided prey species throughout the predatory sequence, although they hunted avoided prey far less frequently than expected based on the number of encounters of them. We conclude that actions of lions throughout the predatory behavioural sequence, but particularly early on, drive the prey preferences that have been documented for this species. Once a hunt is initiated, evolutionary adaptations to the predator-prey interactions drive hunting success
"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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United Kingdom Sully Offline
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I think this may have been posted before but just incase


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Fig. 1. Lion Panthera leo dietary preferences based on Jacobs’ index (mean±1 SE) of 48 lion populations at differing prey densities. Black bars, species taken significantly more frequently than expected based on their availability (preferred); grey bars, species taken in accordance with their relative abundance; unfilled bars, species taken significantly less frequently than expected based on their availability (avoided). Only species recorded in lion diet more than once are included

Prey preferences of the lion (Panthera leo)
"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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Malaysia johnny rex Offline
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(06-01-2020, 08:37 AM)Sully Wrote: I think this may have been posted before but just incase


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Fig. 1. Lion Panthera leo dietary preferences based on Jacobs’ index (mean±1 SE) of 48 lion populations at differing prey densities. Black bars, species taken significantly more frequently than expected based on their availability (preferred); grey bars, species taken in accordance with their relative abundance; unfilled bars, species taken significantly less frequently than expected based on their availability (avoided). Only species recorded in lion diet more than once are included

Prey preferences of the lion (Panthera leo)

Looks like rhinos are the most dangerous prey and maybe the most difficult to take down for lions.
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United Kingdom Ingonyama6 Offline
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( This post was last modified: 06-08-2020, 04:25 PM by Rishi )

Lions have killed an adult African bull elephant on record. Please note that this was not the Savuti bull, it happened in 1938


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