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Leopard Directory

Italy Ngala Offline
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#76

A series of unpublished photos of the late Piva/Treehouse male (August 2017).

From Londolozi Game Reserve, 19 August 2017: Mourning The Piva Male: 29 Never-Before-Seen Photos by Amy Attenborough.

Over the last few days, I have received a barrage of emails from guests expressing their shock and sadness over the death of the Piva male leopard. Some knew him and watched him grow from a young cub to a mature male while others only saw him for a fleeting few moments. Regardless of the length of time spent with him though, it seems his presence always made an impact on those that saw him; possibly more than with any other leopard who has died on Londolozi in the last few years. His photographs adorn homes all over the world and the emails pouring in filled with stories, memories and condolences have been quite astonishing. This is why today we hand the blog over to you, our guests, to celebrate this magnificent cat from your lenses and perspectives.

Words from Londolozi Guest, Irene Nathanson: Each time I visit Londolozi I feel like I am coming home. Home to me is where I feel welcome and reconnect with those I have grown connected to. For me the people and the animals make me feel like I belong. Many people think, as I did, that a trip to Londolozi is a trip of a lifetime but soon realize that once is never enough. Many who have returned and even those who have not visited, become attached to the lions and leopards that Londolozi is known for. Unfortunately sometimes, as with family, we lose the ones we love way too soon. The same can be said for the Piva male leopard. I only saw him for the first time two years ago on a game drive with Ranger Trevor McCall-Peat. We saw him twice during that stay. On one occasion he was just resting in the shade on a hot October day in 2015 and the other he lay draped over a fallen tree; his strong features making him easy to identify.

On my most recent trip, I also got to see him twice with my Ranger, James Souchon. James was able to keep the vehicle ahead of him so I could capture his beauty as he slowly walked towards and then past our vehicle. The last time I saw him was in the morning light among the moist grass; relaxed and stunning. I say goodbye as I write this with tears in my eyes. His face adorns the walls of my home. He lives on…

Photograph by Irene Nathanson

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Photograph by Anthony Goldman

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Photography by Anthony Goldman

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Photograph by Gabriel Clarke

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Photograph by Anthony Goldman

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Photograph by Filipe Edstrom

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Photograph by Gabriel Clarke

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Photograph by Anthony Goldman

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Photograph by Felipe Edstrom

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Photograph by Robert Walder

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Photograph by Anthony Goldman.

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Photograph by Robert Walder

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Photograph by Gabriel Clarke

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Photograph by Irene Nathanson

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Photograph by Yves Christen

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Photograph by Tony Goldman

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Photograph by Gabriel Clarke

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Photograph by Karina Robin

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Photograph by Irene Nathanson

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Photograph by Michael and Terri Klauber

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Photograph by Irene Nathanson

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Photograph by Michael and Terri Klauber

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Photograph by Irene Nathanson

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Photograph by Mary Ashley

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Photograph by Irene Nathanson

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Photograph by Irene Nathanson

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Photograph by Rosanne Zapp

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Photograph by Irene Nathanson

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Photograph by Giulia and Simon

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Photograph by Irene Nathanson

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"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Italy Ngala Offline
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#77
( This post was last modified: 08-24-2017, 03:08 AM by Ngala )

The Bicycle Crossing male, also known as The Bike or the Tugwaan male, is dead (August 2017).

From Mala Mala Game Reserve:
"The Bike is dead. Make no mistake, this is an extremely bitter pill for many of us to swallow. He gave us countless memories during his remarkable life, a life that in time, deserves to be celebrated and remembered. With regard to the cause of his death... bite marks were visible on his lower back but it is not clear what animal inflicted them."

Click on it for play.



"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Italy Ngala Offline
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#78
( This post was last modified: 08-25-2017, 04:57 PM by Ngala )

Credits to Londolozi Blog - Leopards of Londolozi.

Flat Rock 3:2 Male

2013 - present

*This image is copyright of its original author

Unique Markings: Triangle of spots on right cheek.

*This image is copyright of its original author

This male, born to the Porcupine female and Mbavala male on the Tinga concession in the Kruger Park, began moving northwards onto Londolozi in late 2016 after the previous dominant male of the area, the Robson’s 4:4 male, was killed by lions in October of that year.

A young leopard at the time of his arrival on Londolozi, it is unsure whether he would have been able to properly challenge for territory had the area not suddenly become vacant, as he was not yet 4 years old and therefore not at full size and strength.

Within a couple of weeks of his arrival he had killed the newest litter of the resident Mashaba female, which at that time was being denned in the Bushbuck drainage, and not long after killed the female cub of the Nhlanguleni female further west. The male cub was found dead a few months later, and again this leopard was the prime suspect.

Subsequent to this, the Flat Rock male mated with both the Mashaba and Nhlanguleni females, and despite suspected territorial disputes with the older and much larger Piva male, appears to have established himself in a prime although small territory to the west of the Londolozi camps.

It is possible that upon reaching full size he may try and expand his territorial boundaries, but with larger males on all sides of him, this remains to be seen.

Territory:
His territory extends roughly from the Londolozi camps westwards along the Sand River over into Singita, south to most likely the Maxabene River, and slightly north of the Sand River to Sasekile Ingwe crest.

2017

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Other photo:

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"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Italy Ngala Offline
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#79
( This post was last modified: 09-01-2017, 01:59 PM by Ngala )

Tribute to the late Bicycle Crossing male, also known as "The Bike" or the Tugwaan male (dead in August 2017).

From Umkumbe Safari Lodge:
R.I.P Bicycle Crossing Male Leopard
Today we mourn the loss of a local leopard legend - the Bicycle Crossing male. His death has left us heartbroken, torn at the seams and in tatters. We often spoke about "Bike" and "Max" being local contenders for being crowned our favourite male, but we actually loved them both equally! However, there wasn't much rivalry due to them occupying different territories.
Bike appears to have suffered a spinal injury - massive bite marks and puncture wounds were evident on his back. His body was discovered in an area where there is a heavy presence of lion prides - could it have been a lion that launched this attack? Nature is kind, yet devastatingly cruel at times. This is the cycle of life, where the warriors and strong survive. On the plus, our Bike had a good innings - 15 years old isn't bad going!
Here is our tribute to the Bike.

A close-up of the stoic and powerful legend of a male, Bicycle Crossing. 

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The Bicycle Crossing male crouches down to lap up water from a small pan. Bicycle Crossing seems incredibly agile and alert. He probably has a kill stashed in a tree somewhere and took a break to replenish his thirst! 

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The Bicycle Crossing male on patrol in the Sabi Sand. It is always sad to hear about the death of a legend, but we're pretty sure this majestic leopard put up quite the fact.

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Even hero's need to take time out from a busy schedule of patrolling, scent marking and stalking prey. Leopards relax on termite mounds - this gives them an elevated position to survey their landscape. 

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Bicycle Crossing on the move during the cooler hours of the day. 

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"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Italy Ngala Offline
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#80
( This post was last modified: 11-10-2017, 02:26 PM by Ngala )

From Mala Mala Game Reserve, August 2017 Game Report:

BICYCLE CROSSING MALE (DECEASED) 15 YEARS 6 MONTHS
WESTERN MALAMALA, CHARLESTON, FLOCKFIELD
(4 sightings)

The Bicycle Crossing male leopard was a legend amongst leopards, and after 15 years and 7 months of inspiring and humbling all who encountered him, he has finally passed on. His body was found at the confluence of the Kapen and the Sand Rivers, an area in which that he was regularly sighted. 

Before his death he was encountered three times in August. He was first seen sleeping at the confluence of the Rock Drift Donga on the 1 st. He was seen again ten days later on the western bank of the Sand River south of the Charleston Flockfield Boundary with an impala kill he had sequestered from the Calabash female. The last sighting of the Bicycle Crossing male was near Mamba Waterhole where he was seen patiently waiting at the opening of a warthog burrow for some of his favorite prey to emerge.
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Italy Ngala Offline
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#81

From Mala Mala Game Reserve, August 2017 Game Report:

TREEHOUSE MALE (DECEASED) ± 7 YEARS 8 MONTHS
WESTERN MALAMALA, WESTERN FLOCKFIELD, MARTHLY
(3 sightings)

The Treehouse male was another casualty of the month of August. His carcass was found in the early hours of the 12th near Princess Alice Pans and the evidence was clear that he also fell victim to lions. It was also clear to see that he had put up quite a fight as there were claw marks on a small tree that he sought refuge in. Piecing together the evidence, the lions had somehow come across the male and he climbed the tree only to be dragged out and mauled by the lions (suspected the Avoca males).

The Treehouse male leaves behind cubs he has sired with the Nkoveni female, the Tamboti female as well as the new arrivals expected from the Island female who has started showing signs of conception. The future of these leopard cubs remains uncertain as they will have to the male leopards who will be looking to stake their claim on the Treehouse male’s former territory.

The Treehouse male was seen on the two days prior to his death. He was seen near Elephant Rock with the Piccadilly female feeding on the remains of an impala that had been killed by a pack of Cape Hunting Dogs. The Piccadilly female was also showing a very keen interest in the Treehouse male, who only had food on his mind and didn’t seem to share the same intentions with the female. The following day he was seen near Piccadilly pans with a fresh impala kill of his own, he promptly finished the carcass and moved off southwards.
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Italy Ngala Offline
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#82

Mbavala male, also commonly known as "Vin Diesel", is dead (December 2017).

From Ursula Celliers (Facebook):
DEATH OF A LEGEND
After establishing Vin Diesel was in a very poor condition, MPB put out a capture cage to catch him and to establish what was wrong with him. Once he was captured he was taken to Nelspruit for further examination. The vets then established that he was between 13 and 15 years old, his teeth were in very bad condition and the nerves were exposed. It was also found that he had TB. It was then decided to euthanize him because of his poor condition and to end any further suffering. It is a very sad occasion for all those who had seen (and wanted to see) him and a great loss to Sabie Park. However, there is talk that a young leopard has moved into his territory
.

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"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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United States Pckts Offline
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#83

He was my favorite Leopard, R.I.P. big fella.
"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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Italy Ngala Offline
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#84
( This post was last modified: 12-12-2017, 03:24 PM by Ngala )

Short tribute to the late Mbavala male, also known as "Vin Diesel" (dead in December 2017).

From Latest Sightings - Kruger:
"After 13 years, one of the most well-known & biggest leopards in Skukuza region - otherwise known as Vin Diesel - has passed away.
We have followed and tracked him over the years and got to know him well. 
I'll never forget exiting Paul Kruger Gate and spotting what I thought was a lion, but actually turned out to be the biggest Leopard I've seen, Vin Diesel. He then walked on the road, owning every second of it. 
He died of old age, signs of TB and had no teeth left.
If you’ve had sightings of him, comment below.
Tinged by Nadav"

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"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Italy Ngala Offline
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#85

Photo and information credits: Arno Pietersen
"If there was any confusion or doubt that the "Infamous" leopard on H3 was moved or "Removed" from the area, here is an update from this morning live.
DUNLOP is healthy and doing great, plus.........he seems to refrain from coming to the cars to bite/scratch/deflate the tires anymore, i haven't seen him in over 30 days but he is still heavens apart from some HEAVY battle scars from the S112 male in the area, look at the claw marks on the left side of his face! The male that is called "Bridgestone", i know as S112 male ant they had some territorial disputes a few weeks ago, and when i get the chance i will get good pics of him, but all know is he is older and has a bigger neck than D..."


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"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Italy Ngala Offline
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#86

Credits to Londolozi Blog - Leopards of Londolozi.

Torchwood 3:3 Male

2010 - Present

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Unique Markings: Torn notches in ears.

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The Torchwood Male is a young nomadic male that has drifted in from the north of the Sabi Sands in 2013.

Born in November or December 2010 on the Torchwood property, he is now at an age at which his father would most likely have put pressure on him to move out of his territory. His father is the Mvula male (aka Leadwood Male) who is territorial to the north of us, and who we don’t see on Londolozi.

Male leopards typically disperse at around two-and-a-half years, and this is mirrored exactly in the Torchwood male, as the last photo taken of him in the North was round about June 2013. Since then he has moved around the Sabi Sand extensively, being seen in the southern, western, and now central sectors.  Currently the Torchwood male holds territory falling mostly to the west of Londolozi and is infrequently seen.

Other photo:

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"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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United States Fredymrt Offline
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#87

Central Kruger Leopards

A Legend Has Fallen Cyrus, King of the Ngwenyeni River... A celebration of this legend in all his glory! Your presence will be dearly missed... But your legacy will live on!!! Photo Credits - Garry Mills, Leo Bargiacchi, Rene Van der Schyff, Lisl Moolman, Frik Erasmus, Tony Thünemann, Bush View Photography

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Cyrus (male)
Date - 06/02/2018
Time - 15:30
Location - H14, 12km from H9
Photo Credit - Fransie Booyens

Yesterday Fransie Booyens had a very sad sighting of Cyrus being attacked by a clan of hyenas. He was in very poor condition and did not even have the strength to fight. Sadly this will probably the last sighting of him... Even though he was 12 years old, he was still in great condition up to 6 weeks ago from where is condition just deteriorated to almost nothing! This questions whether his condition was disease related... It is sad that his journey has come to an end... But we know he has lived a good life! Even though he will no longer be patrolling the H14, we know his legacy and excellent genes will live on.
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Italy Ngala Offline
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#88

Tribute to a male called Wahu/Wahoo from Okonjima, Namibia.

From AfriCat Namibia:
PAYING TRIBUTE TO A LEGEND!

Some called him WAHU, others WAHOO. A ‘wahoo’ is actually known to be a fish – but this cat was given this unique name, to ‘imitate’ the motherly sound a female leopard makes when she calls her cubs . . . . 
To be able to understand his name completely - YOU will just have to use your imagination and try (quietly and perhaps privately . . .) to make the sound that Wayne Hanssen, made from the day little Wahu arrived on Okonjima! He called him this way ‘to get his attention and to comfort him’. If you get it right – you will know WHY THIS SPECIAL LEOPARD WAS CALLED - WAHU!

As many AfriCat supporters know, WAHU was part of the Hanssen-Okonjima-AfriCat family since he was a week old.

A farmer contacted AfriCat to pick up a cheetah cub that he had just caught on his farm. AfriCat rushed to its rescue, only to find that it was actually a leopard cub. AfriCat begged the farmer to take the little cub back to the area he was found, for there was a good chance that its mother was moving her cubs to a new den and had only temporarily deserted her one cub – and would have later returned to collect it.

On that farm a local herdsman was walking through the bush looking for cattle, and unfortunately stumbled across this little creature and picked it up to take back home, obviously not realising how dangerous that moved could have been, if the mother was close by. Also, like many others before him - naively did not realise that his action on that day – 20 years ago, would be the end of a ‘natural life’ for this little, wild creature . .

So began Wahu’s journey as one of AfriCat’s first rescued carnivores!

Wahu’s eyes were still closed as he was just a few days old. Due to his young age he had to be hand-reared (by Lisa and Wayne Hanssen) which then obviously habituated him and he became unsuitable for release.

At first he spent all his cub-time in their home. As he grew stronger he was taken for long walks in the bush every day by at least one member of the Hanssen family – to try and force him, through trial and error, to hone in those leopard instincts that are strong and accurate. Later on he was given a 500ha enclosure that had natural prey living beside him, but he seemed lonely as he constantly longed for the attention of humans - instead of going wild and living off the available prey. After a few years he was moved to a 12-acre enclosure closer to AfriCat HQ and was then regularly seen by school groups and guests. Wahu was one of AfriCat’s greatest leopard ambassadors - his legacy will live on forever!

For some people, the tragedy of losing a ‘pet’ or a wild animal that has been part of your life for a certain period - occurs in the blink of an eye. One moment everything is fine, and the next your breath is knocked from your chest.
For others, losing an animal you have raised and cared for and loved for many years - occurs over an extended period of time, usually because there is the gradual worsening of an illness before having to make the dreaded decision to end his or her suffering.

But for everyone, there is grief. You are left to deal with a suddenly hollow place left in your heart. It's a space that was once filled with barked greetings, or deep purrs, a head-rub or an intense look of recognition... now strangely parted from your life - forever.

We are not saying that losing your much-loved animal is the worst thing that can happen to a person. But that doesn't make the loss insignificant!

Wahu had been battling with numerous health issues, especially those relating to his kidneys and the arthritis in his legs, which was making life really difficult for him at the age of 20.

After a thorough health check on him, the team together with the Hanssen family, collectively agreed to say good-bye.

All creatures, even those we love most, must die one day. Even we ourselves. That kind of consciousness is what sweeps over one – when you are in the presence of greatness and you know the time has come to say goodbye to a living species that was part of your journey for 20 years!

This was the feeling that swept over everyone that was present the day Dr Rodenwoldt and Dr Tordiffe put Wahu to sleep! The entire AfriCat clinic fell silent and there was a tear in everyone’s heart who witnessed Wahu fall into a deep sleep as his heart grew weaker and weaker and then stopped!

On behalf of Team AfriCat & Wahu, we would like to thank ALL OF YOU for your continuous support. We appreciate your help in aiding us to accomplish our mission which is – the long-term conservation of Namibia’s large carnivores. 
The conservation work at AfriCat is only made possible because of supporters like you!

AfriCat will continue to focus on Environmental Education & Carnivore Research and Community Support, helping as many of Namibia’s large carnivores as possible, by researching solutions for these precious carnivores to survive the harsh reality of their ever increasing challenges, mainly due to human encroachment on their natural habitat.
AfriCat will continue to work towards encouraging co-existence, and more tolerance. We are convinced now, more than ever, that the ‘conservation of wildlife’ will only be taken seriously when the youth of today understands the value of predator, prey and all living creatures and fights for their protection!

Roam the ‘happy hunting grounds’ dear friend. You have done us proud and you have been with us from the beginning of this story – called Okonjima!

Wayne, Donna, Tammy + Rosalea Hanssen, Luigi Bassi, Yolandi Roos & Tristan Boehme

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"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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#89


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Kiran Ambardekar‎-
Kabaso (Male) Leopard...... Masai Mara, Africa.

It was a beautiful morning on the plains of Masai Mara, Africa. We spotted a duo of mother Cheetah and her cub on the plains. On close observation we figured they were keenly scrutinizing a large heard of Thomson Gazelles obviously with the intention to hunt one of them. After a while the mother took her stalking posture and started advancing towards the heard slowly but decisively with the cub in tow. But alas a Hyena appeared on the scene and obviously keeping the security of the cub in her mind the mother gave up on hunting……

Suddenly the radio in our vehicle crackled and somebody spoke in the local language. The excitement in the voice of the person speaking through the radio was unmistakable though we did not understand what he was saying. The person on the radio had barely stopped talking and our driver cum guide just turned the ignition of the vehicle. Vehicle roared to life and our driver steered it towards nearby bushes while shouting Kabaso Male Leopard, Kabaso, Kabaso….

I really did not understand his excitement and sense of urgency. I had seen leopards in forests in India. It did not make sense to me to leave a stalking Cheetah to go after a leopard. 

Our vehicle entered the bushes and suddenly this huge male leopard appeared from behind a bush, its mean eyes fixated on us….. Kabaso male lepoard….. It was huge…… I had never seen such a huge leopard before. Our guide shouted, take pictures quickly, this fellow is too shy and elusive…… Sure enough, like a steak of lightening it disappeared, behind nearby bushes on the other side and was lost to us. I clicked a few images in the intervening few second that the leopard was visible. Here is one such image from that series…..

Well after that we went back to the stalking Cheetah duo…… I have already written about that saga and shared few images few weeks back.
"ssshhh...listen to the rain"...
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India Sanju Offline
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#90




When Need turns to Greed, our Extinction happens, lol.
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