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Leopard Directory

Italy Ngala Offline
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#76

A series of unpublished photos of the late Piva/Treehouse male (August 2017).

From Londolozi Game Reserve, 19 August 2017: Mourning The Piva Male: 29 Never-Before-Seen Photos by Amy Attenborough.

Over the last few days, I have received a barrage of emails from guests expressing their shock and sadness over the death of the Piva male leopard. Some knew him and watched him grow from a young cub to a mature male while others only saw him for a fleeting few moments. Regardless of the length of time spent with him though, it seems his presence always made an impact on those that saw him; possibly more than with any other leopard who has died on Londolozi in the last few years. His photographs adorn homes all over the world and the emails pouring in filled with stories, memories and condolences have been quite astonishing. This is why today we hand the blog over to you, our guests, to celebrate this magnificent cat from your lenses and perspectives.

Words from Londolozi Guest, Irene Nathanson: Each time I visit Londolozi I feel like I am coming home. Home to me is where I feel welcome and reconnect with those I have grown connected to. For me the people and the animals make me feel like I belong. Many people think, as I did, that a trip to Londolozi is a trip of a lifetime but soon realize that once is never enough. Many who have returned and even those who have not visited, become attached to the lions and leopards that Londolozi is known for. Unfortunately sometimes, as with family, we lose the ones we love way too soon. The same can be said for the Piva male leopard. I only saw him for the first time two years ago on a game drive with Ranger Trevor McCall-Peat. We saw him twice during that stay. On one occasion he was just resting in the shade on a hot October day in 2015 and the other he lay draped over a fallen tree; his strong features making him easy to identify.

On my most recent trip, I also got to see him twice with my Ranger, James Souchon. James was able to keep the vehicle ahead of him so I could capture his beauty as he slowly walked towards and then past our vehicle. The last time I saw him was in the morning light among the moist grass; relaxed and stunning. I say goodbye as I write this with tears in my eyes. His face adorns the walls of my home. He lives on…

Photograph by Irene Nathanson

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Photograph by Anthony Goldman

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Photography by Anthony Goldman

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Photograph by Gabriel Clarke

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Photograph by Anthony Goldman

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Photograph by Filipe Edstrom

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Photograph by Gabriel Clarke

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Photograph by Anthony Goldman

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Photograph by Felipe Edstrom

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Photograph by Robert Walder

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Photograph by Anthony Goldman.

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Photograph by Robert Walder

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Photograph by Gabriel Clarke

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Photograph by Irene Nathanson

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Photograph by Yves Christen

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Photograph by Tony Goldman

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Photograph by Gabriel Clarke

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Photograph by Karina Robin

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Photograph by Irene Nathanson

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Photograph by Michael and Terri Klauber

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Photograph by Irene Nathanson

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Photograph by Michael and Terri Klauber

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Photograph by Irene Nathanson

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Photograph by Mary Ashley

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Photograph by Irene Nathanson

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Photograph by Irene Nathanson

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Photograph by Rosanne Zapp

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Photograph by Irene Nathanson

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Photograph by Giulia and Simon

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Photograph by Irene Nathanson

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"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Italy Ngala Offline
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#77
( This post was last modified: 08-24-2017, 03:08 AM by Ngala )

The Bicycle Crossing male, also known as The Bike or the Tugwaan male, is dead (August 2017).

From Mala Mala Game Reserve:
"The Bike is dead. Make no mistake, this is an extremely bitter pill for many of us to swallow. He gave us countless memories during his remarkable life, a life that in time, deserves to be celebrated and remembered. With regard to the cause of his death... bite marks were visible on his lower back but it is not clear what animal inflicted them."

Click on it for play.



"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Italy Ngala Offline
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#78
( This post was last modified: 08-25-2017, 04:57 PM by Ngala )

Credits to Londolozi Blog - Leopards of Londolozi.

Flat Rock 3:2 Male

2013 - present

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Unique Markings: Triangle of spots on right cheek.

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This male, born to the Porcupine female and Mbavala male on the Tinga concession in the Kruger Park, began moving northwards onto Londolozi in late 2016 after the previous dominant male of the area, the Robson’s 4:4 male, was killed by lions in October of that year.

A young leopard at the time of his arrival on Londolozi, it is unsure whether he would have been able to properly challenge for territory had the area not suddenly become vacant, as he was not yet 4 years old and therefore not at full size and strength.

Within a couple of weeks of his arrival he had killed the newest litter of the resident Mashaba female, which at that time was being denned in the Bushbuck drainage, and not long after killed the female cub of the Nhlanguleni female further west. The male cub was found dead a few months later, and again this leopard was the prime suspect.

Subsequent to this, the Flat Rock male mated with both the Mashaba and Nhlanguleni females, and despite suspected territorial disputes with the older and much larger Piva male, appears to have established himself in a prime although small territory to the west of the Londolozi camps.

It is possible that upon reaching full size he may try and expand his territorial boundaries, but with larger males on all sides of him, this remains to be seen.

Territory:
His territory extends roughly from the Londolozi camps westwards along the Sand River over into Singita, south to most likely the Maxabene River, and slightly north of the Sand River to Sasekile Ingwe crest.

2017

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Other photo:

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"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Italy Ngala Offline
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#79
( This post was last modified: 09-01-2017, 01:59 PM by Ngala )

Tribute to the late Bicycle Crossing male, also known as "The Bike" or the Tugwaan male (dead in August 2017).

From Umkumbe Safari Lodge:
R.I.P Bicycle Crossing Male Leopard
Today we mourn the loss of a local leopard legend - the Bicycle Crossing male. His death has left us heartbroken, torn at the seams and in tatters. We often spoke about "Bike" and "Max" being local contenders for being crowned our favourite male, but we actually loved them both equally! However, there wasn't much rivalry due to them occupying different territories.
Bike appears to have suffered a spinal injury - massive bite marks and puncture wounds were evident on his back. His body was discovered in an area where there is a heavy presence of lion prides - could it have been a lion that launched this attack? Nature is kind, yet devastatingly cruel at times. This is the cycle of life, where the warriors and strong survive. On the plus, our Bike had a good innings - 15 years old isn't bad going!
Here is our tribute to the Bike.

A close-up of the stoic and powerful legend of a male, Bicycle Crossing. 

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The Bicycle Crossing male crouches down to lap up water from a small pan. Bicycle Crossing seems incredibly agile and alert. He probably has a kill stashed in a tree somewhere and took a break to replenish his thirst! 

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The Bicycle Crossing male on patrol in the Sabi Sand. It is always sad to hear about the death of a legend, but we're pretty sure this majestic leopard put up quite the fact.

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Even hero's need to take time out from a busy schedule of patrolling, scent marking and stalking prey. Leopards relax on termite mounds - this gives them an elevated position to survey their landscape. 

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Bicycle Crossing on the move during the cooler hours of the day. 

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"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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