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Leopard Directory

Argentina Tshokwane Offline
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#16

Hi @LindaB . I'm glad you joined us.
The thing that you note with the leopard info is common, usually different reserves will name a leopard differently, and that makes recognizing the leopard a little bit more difficult. 
Would you like to post the info you are gathering? That way we can work on it, correct it when it's not accurate and then when we have a big bunch of data you can use it to your website.
And aside this, I hope you like the forum, there is info on all the big cats especially and also on many other animals.
Welcome.
‘Like night-watchmen they patrol the dark nights; marching with intent and chasing all those unwanted into the shadows…those that do not run are removed’
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Canada LindaB Offline
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#17

Need verification of offspring and some holes filled in for this leopard.

There were 2 female cubs born in 2004 both named "Daughter of Jakkalsdraai Female". For my records to keep them straight, I tacked on "I" and "II" and the year of their birth.

What I need to know is

1. What was the second daughter named? The first was named "Flockfield Female", but I can't find a name for her twin sister.
2. I also need spot pattern of Flockfield Female.
3. Is the Brother from October 2008 still alive? He was as of January 2012.
4. Jakkalsdraai Female had a cub in June 2010. I can't find anything more on this cub. Is it dead or alive?
5. Any updates on her cub born May 2011? Or is it still "Status Unknown"?

*****************************************************************

Leopard Name: Flockfield Female
aka: Daughter of the Jakkalsdraai Female I - 2004

Meaning:
Gender: Female

Age or birth year: (April 2004)

Mother: Jakkalsdraai Female (1999)
Father: Unknown


Siblings:
- Daughter of the Jakkalsdraai Female II - 2004   Mother: Jakkalsdraai Female

- Male cub (October 2008) - Alive as of January 2012   Mother: Jakkalsdraai Female
- 1 cub (June 2010) - Deceased?    Mother: Jakkalsdraai Female

Spot Pattern: ?


Other identifying features:

Typical territory roamed: MalaMala. CENTRAL & EASTERN FLOCKFIELD, NORTHERN CHARLESTON

Last confirmed sighting:
June 2015 - Sightings are infrequent and extended periods (months) go by without seeing her. In 25 months, there were only 3 sightings on MalaMala.

Offspring:
- Cub spotted (May 2011). Status unknown as of March 2013. It is either independent or deceased.
Flockfield Female sightings are infrequent and extended periods (months) go by without seeing her. So the cub status is unknown.
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Canada LindaB Offline
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#18

Question about Kikilezi female (born October 2001)

She had 2 female cubs in December 2013 or very early January 2014.  Father would be Airstrip Male.


One of the females has a darker face than the other, and a 3:3 spot pattern.

I know the 2 female cubs are alive and well and have not been named yet.

But she also had 2 male cubs born in 2008. One died very young. I can't find any information on the second cub. It is eluded to that he lived because for most litters she has successfully raised at least one cub to independence.  So he would be the surviving cub of this particular litter.

Does anyone know the name of this boy?
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India sanjay Online
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#19

@LindaB , I think some of best poster who know about leopards are @chui_ and @Ursus arctos and for now they are not active, Hope they will see your question and will reply soon.

Actually, We don't have the informed poster related to Leopard and I guess they are rare anywhere on internet
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Netherlands peter Offline
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#20
( This post was last modified: 10-05-2015, 03:21 AM by peter )

(10-03-2015, 01:27 AM)LindaB Wrote: Question about Kikilezi female (born October 2001)

She had 2 female cubs in December 2013 or very early January 2014.  Father would be Airstrip Male.


One of the females has a darker face than the other, and a 3:3 spot pattern.

I know the 2 female cubs are alive and well and have not been named yet.

But she also had 2 male cubs born in 2008. One died very young. I can't find any information on the second cub. It is eluded to that he lived because for most litters she has successfully raised at least one cub to independence.  So he would be the surviving cub of this particular litter.

Does anyone know the name of this boy?


Hi Linda.  

I will get straight to the point. The information you want requires detailed knowledge of individual leopards in the region you mentioned. The members who might be able to help out, however, do not seem to be at home at the moment. 

As we want to assist in some way, we decided to direct you to another animal forum. The Carnivora forum has a number of posters interested in leopards. We think some of them could have the information you're after. One of these would be a poster called 'Chui', but he isn't the only one. 

We hope you will find someone able to help out. If you have time, it would be much appreciated if you could inform us about your quest in a new thread. Good luck on behalf of all of us,

Peter.
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Argentina Tshokwane Offline
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#21
( This post was last modified: 04-05-2016, 08:37 PM by Tshokwane )

This is a post that I wanted to make for a long time now, but sometimes being busy with work or when I did have time, with the updates about the lions, I always ended up leaving it for later.

It's about one of my favourite leopards, the son of the Short tail/ Bicycle crossing male posted in the first page.

This is the Airstrip male, also known as Dudley Riverbank 5:5 male by Londolozi.

*This image is copyright of its original author

This is his spot pattern.

*This image is copyright of its original author

And this is his lineage, also by Mala Mala:

*This image is copyright of its original author

Info by Mala Mala:
In June 2006, the Dudley female gave birth to a litter of two male cubs. When the cubs were still young, they – and their mother – were feeding at a kill, which was sniffed out by hyenas. Confusion ensued, and the cubs were separated from their mother. The Dudley female managed to locate one of her cubs and she successfully raised him to independence. He is now known as the Charleston male, and is territorial in the southern parts of the property. The Newington female, the grandmother of these two cubs, happened to be in the vicinity when the cubs were lost, and coincidentally had also just lost a cub of her own. The Newington female called gently for her missing cub, and the remaining cub of the Dudley female responded to her calls. This cub was then adopted by his grandmother, and also survived to independence and became known as the Airstrip male. This is a set of remarkable circumstances, and we are not aware of a similar event being recorded.
Here's Airstrip with his nonna, who raised him to adulthood.

*This image is copyright of its original author

From humble beginnings around the runway, the Airstrip male began to expand his domain as he matured. He is by no means a big male leopard. Short and stocky, what he lacks in size is easily made up for with his courage. Upon engaging in his task of expansion, he would have to be wary of other male leopards in the area. Upon engaging in his task of expansion, he would have to be wary of other male leopards in the area. His father, the legendary Bicycle Crossing male had already started to age, and shifted his territory further south in response to pressure from his son and the Princess Alice Pans male,who is a large specimen residing further to the west. Against the odds, the Airstrip male was able to intimidate the much bigger Princess Alice Pans male, and the big male retreated. As a sign of his rising dominance, the Airstrip male was then seen mating with the Western female who had preferred the Princess Alice Pans male on many occasions in the past.  The threat to the east possibly presented his greatest challenge. This came in the form of the Emsagwen male. Also a large male, he was an influence pushing the Bicycle Crossing male south. In an unexpected turn of events, the Emsagwen male disappeared in the winter of 2011. He was a mature male controlling a large territory, and we can only speculate as to how he was killed. His disappearance meant that there were now large tracts of land up for grabs. The Airstrip male was on hand to reap the benefits. It was incredible to watch as the Airstrip male marched along the exact same routes along which the Emsagwen male used to travel.


He was now in control of an enormous empire. From the Airstrip and for many miles westwards, to Marthly, the Mlowathi and as far east as Emsagwen, the male was now well in control. After a few weeks he began to change his territorial routes, and he abandoned a portion of his new kingdom. This was perhaps a smart move. Male leopards will try and control as big an area as the individual can effectively control, limited only by his ability to cover ground and dominate other males he may come into contact with. The result of establishing a large territory means that it will incorporate the territories of many females, which has obvious benefits for the male. The areas that the Airstrip male neglected to include are mainly to the north and east. He no longer visits the areas anywhere north of the Gowrie boundary, both areas that were under the control of the Emsagwen male. In August this year the male has had a new threat to his kingdom from ‘Tyson’, otherwise known as the ‘Marthly male’, a huge leopard from the north that is venturing south into the core areas of the Airstrip male’s territory. The Gowrie male, who operates around the Mlowathi River, is also a potential threat, but so far the Airstrip male has managed to keep both at bay.

And this is a trademark for him. Since he became independent, he's had to battle with different males, most of which are much bigger than him, like the legends Camp Pan(one of the biggest leopards in the Sabi Sands, said to weight something close of 90 kg) and the Marthly male/ Tyson. 
Battles vs Tyson were not an easy thing, and they took its toll.

*This image is copyright of its original author

You always hear that leopards don't like to fight, that they avoid physical contact so as to not damage their ability to hunt and blah, blah, blah... Well, this happen in yet another fight vs Tyson, so this may give you an idea of the kind of character he has. In this sense, he reminds me of Gabbar, the male tiger.

*This image is copyright of its original author

The injury to his eye was so important that he ended up losing the sight of that left eye.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Still, he went on, and still does. Now he has to face again a much bigger oponent, the Piva/ Treehouse male, who is also three or fours years younger than him. They've already had some encounters, but nothing too serious. Still, Piva is gaining confidence so Airstrip will have to decide wether to face him in a full-on battle that could cost him a lot(because of his age) or to switch a little his territory, something possible now because of the dissapearence of the Gowrie male.

This is his part of his territory, showing the little shift he may make coming from Mala Mala into the north-eastern part of Londolozi:

*This image is copyright of its original author


The only downside to this male tenure as dominant is the low success he's had when siring offsprings. For all the badass he is, and the frim grip he has always kept in his territory and his patrols, he hasn't been able to imprint that in cubs. A couple of litters he had with the Kikilezi female were killed, and as of now, after many years as a dominant male, only the two daughters of the Kikilezi female are considered his(although even this may be questioned, as female leopards mate with several males, and that time she also mated with the Marthly male, the one who beat the crap out of Airstrip).
But, in any case, Airstrip has helped to raise the two girls, has tolerated them around kills, or simply has spend time hanging out with Kikilezi and the cubs, so I consider the two females, who are now almost independent, to be his daughters.

So, aside the fact that he hasn't been so successful in the reproductive sense as his father, Airstrip is still a dominant force and an amazing leopard to watch.

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author
‘Like night-watchmen they patrol the dark nights; marching with intent and chasing all those unwanted into the shadows…those that do not run are removed’
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United States jacksonsmash Offline
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#22

what does the 4:3 or 3:3 after a leopards name mean
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Argentina Tshokwane Offline
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#23

(08-18-2016, 09:32 AM)jacksonsmash Wrote: what does the 4:3 or 3:3 after a leopards name mean

It is the spot patter above the whiskers that allow the rangers to identify the leopards. Sometimes it's hard to, and when it is young even more, so learning the spot pattern helps you identify it, that's how they are able to differentiate between individuals.

For example, the leopard in the post above, the Airstrip male.

If we look at the drawing representing him, you can see he has 5 spots on each side of his face, above the whiskers. So, he would be the 5:5 male, in fact the Londolozi reserve called him the Dudley Riverbank 5:5 male.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Here in this pic you can confirm the spot pattern.

*This image is copyright of its original author
‘Like night-watchmen they patrol the dark nights; marching with intent and chasing all those unwanted into the shadows…those that do not run are removed’
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United States jacksonsmash Offline
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#24

i am just soaking this up and loving it.thank you for sharing your knowledge and educating this lover of wildlife and nature. Lol Like
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Argentina Tshokwane Offline
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#25

You're welcome, Jackson.

This is exactly the reason of existing for the forum. To help everyone to know always a bit more about nature and wildlife.
‘Like night-watchmen they patrol the dark nights; marching with intent and chasing all those unwanted into the shadows…those that do not run are removed’
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Argentina Tshokwane Offline
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#26

Credits to Londolozi Blog.

Inyathini 3:3 Male

2008 - present.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Unique markings: Short tail

*This image is copyright of its original author

Another leopard who originated in the Kruger National Park, this male was unrelaxed and even aggressive towards vehicles when first viewed on the Londolozi property, and charged a number of rangers during the early months of his tenure. After repeated viewings he has relaxed far more than his northern counterpart the 4:4 male, and sightings of him are far more consistent now, with him being quite comfortable having three vehicles view him at a time.


He has established a large territory in the south eastern areas of Londolozi, from the Dudley Camp region along the Sand river to the eastern edge of the central grasslands. The area is relatively thick and tracking him can be difficult, but he has a few favourite haunts where sightings have been relatively consistent.

He was believed to have fathered the Ndzanzeni female’s first litter in late 2015, but that litter was lost and he has been seen mating with her since then.

A serious territorial spat with the Piva male in winter of 2015 left both leopards cut up around the face and neck, but since then it seems that their respective territorial boundaries have been firmly established.

Territory

This leopard's territory falls mainly in eastern Dudley, with some of his favourite patrol routes and hunting spots falling around the Tugwaan Drainage. These areas provide ideal resting spots in the heavily shaded riverine bush, a high prey density as well as clean drinking water.

2014

*This image is copyright of its original author

2015

*This image is copyright of its original author

2016

*This image is copyright of its original author
‘Like night-watchmen they patrol the dark nights; marching with intent and chasing all those unwanted into the shadows…those that do not run are removed’
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Argentina Tshokwane Offline
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#27

Credits to Londolozi Blog.

Anderson 4:4 Male

2008 - present

*This image is copyright of its original author

Unique Markings: Enormous head, neck and shoulders.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Scar below left eye.

*This image is copyright of its original author

One of the biggest leopards in the Sabi Sands, the Anderson male is an absolutely enormous individual who is seen in the north western sections of Londolozi, from Ximpalapala koppie up to the northern break. After the death of the Marthly male, he has been seen to push further south and eastwards, and although being seen more regularly, is not 100% relaxed around vehicles yet.


Although viewed occasionally in 2014, it was only upon the disappearance of the Marthly male that sightings of the Anderson male started becoming more frequent.

He was seen mating with the Nanga female in April and May 2016, the female having lost a young litter of cubs shortly before that.

Born in 2008, the Andreson male should still hopefully have many years left in him, and it is likely that his size will keep him firmly established in his area for some time to come.

Territory

This leopard's territory falls into north western Marthly and has progressively been stretching further south and east into Londolozi. He is predominantly seen around the Ximpalapala Koppies, an ideal vantage point or even hunting spot for the rarely seen Klipspringer. Being such a large male, it is likely he is attempting to extend his territory further south to include the hotly contested Sand River, although he has not been recorded this far south yet.

2014

*This image is copyright of its original author

2015

*This image is copyright of its original author

2016

*This image is copyright of its original author
‘Like night-watchmen they patrol the dark nights; marching with intent and chasing all those unwanted into the shadows…those that do not run are removed’
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Argentina Tshokwane Offline
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#28

Credits to Londolozi Blog.

Robson's 4:4 Male

2010 - present.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Unique Markings: Elongated forehead.

*This image is copyright of its original author

This rangy male is rather an enigma, having arrived on Londolozi in the mid- to latter parts of 2014 and staying mainly in the western areas of the reserve, around the Sparta/Ravenscourt break and Mhangeni Donga. Sightings of a relatively unrelaxed male in the block south of Ximpalapala koppie from around the same time are also believed to be him.


His skittish nature leads us to suspect that he originated in the Kruger Park and grew up not being used to vehicles approaching him. First reports of this male were in the north of the Sabi Sands as a sub-adult in 2012.

Since 2014 this male has expanded his territory massively, being found from beyond the Maxabene River in the south to the upper reaches of the Manyelethi River in the north, operating mainly in the western portions of Sparta. His territory is roughly the same size as the Camp Pan male’s once was, despite the 4:4 male being a significantly smaller animal.

He is believed to be the father of the Mashaba female’s cub and the February 2016 litter of the Nkoveni female. He has also been seen in the company of the Nhlanguleni female and her cubs, and although she was seen mating with the Nyelethi male in the west last year, at least the 4:4 male believes himself to be the litter’s father.

Sightings of this leopard are irregular at best, as he is reticent to patrol along roads, preferring to stay in drainage lines and thickets. When females in the area have kills hoisted, it is not uncommon to find the male feeding on the kill the next morning, having smelt it out during the night.

In most sightings this leopard is nervous of more than two vehicles, but sometimes he relaxes tremendously for unknown reasons. We hope he relaxes more as sightings become more frequent.

Territory

This leopard has a large territory that encompasses Sparta, predominantly north of the Maxabene all the way to central Marthly. Because this area is so large, he moves constantly and covers big distances in order to scent mark and patrol the area, thereby protecting it from potential male contenders.

2014

*This image is copyright of its original author

2015

*This image is copyright of its original author

2016

*This image is copyright of its original author
‘Like night-watchmen they patrol the dark nights; marching with intent and chasing all those unwanted into the shadows…those that do not run are removed’
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Italy Ngala Offline
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#29
( This post was last modified: 09-03-2016, 07:43 PM by Ngala )

Very nice work @Majingilane, i enjoy it. Very Interesting. If there aren't a problems for you, i insert the other males (alive, for now) present in the Londolozi Blog.
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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Italy Ngala Offline
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#30
( This post was last modified: 02-06-2017, 09:03 PM by Ngala Edit Reason: add other photo )

Credits to Londolozi Blog - Leopards of Londolozi.

Tugwaan 5:4 Male (Bicycle Crossing Male)

Mother: Short Tail 3:4 Female
Littermate: Ximpalapala 4:4 Female
Sons: 
2006: Litter: Dudley Riverbank 5:5 Male (Airstrip Male) + Dudley Riverbank 4:3 Male (Xovonikela) -----> Dudley Riverbank 3:3 Female (Dudley Female)
2012: Ndzanzeni 4:3 Female -----> Mother: Dudley Riverbank 3:3 Female (Dudley Female)

2002 - Present

*This image is copyright of its original author

Unique Markings"V" shape of spots on forehead.

*This image is copyright of its original author

A beautiful male with a distinctive “V” shape on his forehead, the Tugwaan male was dominant for many years over a huge territory that stretched from beyond the Sand River in the east almost to the western boundary of the Sabi Sand.

Born to the Short-tailed female in Marthly in 2001 in the same litter as the Ximpalapala female, he began moving south and east, establishing himself during the latter part of 2004 in the eastern sections of Londolozi.

From there his territorial shift was southwards, possibly due to pressure from the bigger Camp Pan male.

The Tugwaan male in his prime held territory centred along the Tugwaan riverbed, which is where he got his name, but he was encountered as north of the Maxabene and even beyond Londolozi’s southern borders.

In later life he suffered from the knock-on effect of an influx of males from the north. The Marthly male pushed south, which in turn forced the Camp Pan male south, which led the the Tugwaan male being displaced to the south and east of Londolozi and rarely seen.

At the time of writing the Tugwaan male is 15 years old and in the twilight of his life. Although it is difficult to assign paternity to cubs, as females will mate with multiple males, it is almost certain that the Tugwaan male sired the Ndzanzeni female, and has done his part to incorporate his genes in the royal lineage of Londolozi.

Territory:
Males typically have a much larger territory than females but the Tugwaan male had a particularly large one that stretched almost the width of the Sabi Sands, incorporating many habitat types. With the movement of other dominant males in his later years, his territory was shifted to south-east Dudley and south of that towards the Sabie River, still prime habitat for leopard.

2002

*This image is copyright of its original author

2003-2004

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2005-2006

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2007-2010

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2011

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2012

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2013

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2014

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2015-2016

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Other photo:

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*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


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*This image is copyright of its original author
"Man still bears in his bodily frame the indelible stamp of his lowly origin." C. Darwin
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