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Bigcats News

Germany Lycaon Offline
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I am really glad that their finally is a range wide protection plan for these lions


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Link : https://twitter.com/wcssudanosahel/status/1148213422175215616
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United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
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( This post was last modified: 07-12-2019, 09:26 PM by BorneanTiger )

(07-11-2019, 11:52 AM)BorneanTiger Wrote: Forward from (https://wildfact.com/forum/topic-crocodi...ion?page=6), there was a controversy over a video of a caiman defecating the carcass of a felid, identified as a jaguar, in Brazil earlier:




There have been arguments that this could be a female or juvenile jaguar, or even another felid species, such as an ocelot. About the jaguar, let me clarify what the situation is with its size:

Generally, the size of jaguars increases from north to south: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4380383/https://www.earthtouchnews.com/conservat...nst-pumas/

* Central or North American jaguars, ranging from southern USA and northern Mexico in the north, to Panama in the south, are fairly small, with those in the Camela-Cuixmala Biosphere Reserve on the Mexican coast of the Pacific, northern Mexico and Belize at least weighing about 50–60 kg (110–132 pounds), similar to average cougars: https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/...75E1DC9FF5https://www.earthtouchnews.com/conservat...nst-pumas/

El Jefe the Arizonan jaguar, likely of Mexican origin: http://www.delhidailynews.com/news/El-Je...454851534/

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* Large male Northern South American jaguars (as in, South American jaguars north of the Amazon River) in the Amazonian region, which includes Guyana and Venezuela, may weigh 90–120 kg (200–260 lbs), with the average for male and female Venezuelan jaguars being respectively 95 kg (209.4 lbs) and 56.3 kg (124 lbs, similar to Central American males in Belize), and Venezuelan females weighing up to 90 kg (200 lbs): https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4380383/https://web.archive.org/web/201006202310...1-0001.pdfhttps://books.google.com/books?id=T37sFC...&q&f=false

Northern South American jaguar in Guyana: https://phys.org/news/2013-01-guyana-ple...guars.html

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* Certain Southern South American jaguars (as in, South American jaguars south of the Amazon River) from the Pantanal region are the largest of the species, with lengths of about 2.7 m (8.9 ft), and average weights of 94.8 kg (209 lbs) for males and 77.7 kg (171 lbs) for females (https://www.zobodat.at/pdf/Zeitschrift-S...6-0301.pdf). Some individuals weighed up to or more than 135 kg (298 lbs): https://web.archive.org/web/200712280610...razil.htmlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4380383/

Pantanal jaguar: https://www.tripadvisor.co.za/LocationPh...rosso.html

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I change my mind, it seems that even northern South American jaguars at Los Llanos, Venezuela, can be quite big: https://www.researchgate.net/publication..._evolution
"Body size of today’s jaguars is highly variable; the largest are found in the Brazilian Pantanal and Venezuelan Llanos (mean male body mass >100kg). The smallest jaguars live in Central America (~56kg)."

Venezuelan jaguar at Los Llanos: https://www.pinterest.es/pin/535506211933874521/

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India Ashutosh Offline
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Some good news. Tigers have been spotted for the first time in Kheoni Wildlife Sanctuary in Madhya Pradesh.

Quote:A tiger, two tigresses and two cubs have been captured for the first time by the night-vision cameras set up in the sanctuary, Dewas Divisional Forest Officer (DFO) PN Mishra said.

https://www.news18.com/news/india/tigers-spotted-for-first-time-in-madhya-pradeshs-kheoni-wildlife-sanctuary-2202047.html
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India sanjay Offline
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Every year, In this season rain comes in India, Overall its good for most of the living being, but not for animals, specially living in Kaziranga National Park India.
Bikash Borah from Assam posted this images taken from Kaziranga National Park, and he writes:

This post may be the violation of the code of this group. But I can't stop myself from sharing my grief. This pictures really broke my heart to its core. These pictures are from Kaziranga National Park which is only 20 KM distance from my home. These pictures were not taken by me but shared by the people who saw the devastation. Every year flood happens in Assam but this time the situation is the worst. Almost 80% of Kaziranga has already submerged in the flood and hundreds of animals already died. We all students away from home are trying to do whatever possible to help those who are suffering. Please pray for Assam and pray for those poor animals. Hope this suffering will end soon ???

Tigers died during flood in kaziranga National Park, India
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Really this break heart Disappointed
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India Ashutosh Offline
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( This post was last modified: 07-17-2019, 01:54 AM by Ashutosh )

@sanjay, I used to have very similar concerns, but a person from assam corrected me and said, these floods are what make Kaziranga the pristine and unique habitat that it is. Floodplains need floods to rejuvenate after wear and tear of a whole year and whenever the Brahmaputra floods, it adds so much minerals and sediments which aids in growth of the elephant grass that Kaziranga is famous for. She also told me that park officials in Kaziranga practice controlled burning in grassland areas because they don’t want tress to grow in place of the elephant grass. The animals over the ages have gotten used to this cycle, just like animals in Sunderbans have adapted and learnt how to live with the tide of the sea.

The major issue is the threats that the animals face when they move to higher grounds, and that is where the actual vigilance should be kept. The animals that are claimed by the flood are part of the natural cycle of a floodplain like Kaziranga. Humans on the other hand, well, I do sympathize with them whose houses are flooded every year.
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India sanjay Offline
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Wise words @Ashutosh, We should agree that mother nature take best course for planet. This is unfortunate for some but may be blessing in long term. Over all I feel east of India is better than other part of India climate wise.
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India Rishi Online
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( This post was last modified: 07-17-2019, 03:56 PM by Rishi )

(07-17-2019, 01:50 AM)Ashutosh Wrote: @sanjay, I used to have very similar concerns, but a person from assam corrected me and said, these floods are what make Kaziranga the pristine and unique habitat that it is. Floodplains need floods to rejuvenate after wear and tear of a whole year and whenever the Brahmaputra floods, it adds so much minerals and sediments which aids in growth of the elephant grass that Kaziranga is famous for. She also told me that park officials in Kaziranga practice controlled burning in grassland areas because they don’t want tress to grow in place of the elephant grass.

The fire & water keeps the trees from taking over. Having seen direct close comparison between the two at Dooars, i learnt that Terai-NE those tall swampy grasslands are much more bountiful compared to the jungles

Same area of grasslands can support 5 times more of the Asian megafauna... buffaloes, rhinos, elephants (not gaurs) all prefer them. Grasslands are even being artificially created in place of degraded vegetation areas Buxa, Valmiki etc. tiger reserves.
Rhinos don't even live in the forests of there aren't grasslands nearby. That's why Chitwan has less rhinos than Kaziranga.
"Everything not saved will be lost."

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United States Pckts Offline
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( This post was last modified: 07-18-2019, 01:17 PM by sanjay Edit Reason: corrected the formating )

Male tiger found dead in The Nilgiris. Poisoned by farmers since the Tiger was feeding on cattle. How can we sympathize with humans if they don't understand and follow the laws? Animals don't have laws, but we do. Why do the FD and govt authorities not take stringent action when we have strict laws against wildlife crime?

How can we possibly keep losing our National Animal and pride this way?! Where are the so-called experts and brand ambassadors of heavily foreign funded and corporate backed "Save the Tiger" campaigns?? The alarming rate at which we are losing our wildlife show that these organisations running for decades are all FRAUDS!! They have done NOTHING to mitigate this crisis! All they've done is appeal for sponsorship and line their own pockets with funds from all over the world!! 
SHAME ON THEM ALL !! ??

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"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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Finland Shadow Offline
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(07-18-2019, 02:23 AM)Pckts Wrote: Male tiger found dead in The Nilgiris. Poisoned by farmers since the Tiger was feeding on cattle. How can we sympathize with humans if they don't understand and follow the laws? Animals don't have laws, but we do. Why do the FD and govt authorities not take stringent action when we have strict laws against wildlife crime?!

How can we possibly keep losing our National Animal and pride this way?! Where are the so-called experts and brand ambassadors of heavily foreign funded and corporate backed "Save the Tiger" campaigns?? The alarming rate at which we are losing our wildlife show that these organisations running for decades are all FRAUDS!! They have done NOTHING to mitigate this crisis! All they've done is appeal for sponsorship and line their own pockets with funds from all over the world!! 
SHAME ON THEM ALL !! ???


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author

This is a good example for it, why there need to be reasonable compensations, when predators kill domestic cattle. If there isn´t some functional system, people take actions in their own hands and there is really nothing to stop it. That is harsh reality, what can´t be ignored.
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India Rishi Online
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Exclamation  ( This post was last modified: 07-18-2019, 05:22 PM by Rishi )

(07-18-2019, 02:29 AM)Shadow Wrote:
(07-18-2019, 02:23 AM)Pckts Wrote: Male tiger found dead in The Nilgiris. Poisoned by farmers since the Tiger was feeding on cattle. How can we sympathize with humans if they don't understand and follow the laws? Animals don't have laws, but we do. Why do the FD and govt authorities not take stringent action when we have strict laws against wildlife crime?!

How can we possibly keep losing our National Animal and pride this way?! Where are the so-called experts and brand ambassadors of heavily foreign funded and corporate backed "Save the Tiger" campaigns?? The alarming rate at which we are losing our wildlife show that these organisations running for decades are all FRAUDS!! They have done NOTHING to mitigate this crisis! All they've done is appeal for sponsorship and line their own pockets with funds from all over the world!! 
SHAME ON THEM ALL !! ???


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author

This is a good example for it, why there need to be reasonable compensations, when predators kill domestic cattle. If there isn´t some functional system, people take actions in their own hands and there is really nothing to stop it. That is harsh reality, what can´t be ignored.

I don't know where he got the text from, but that insensitive attitude by India's upper/middle class urban "online animal-lovers" living in a little world of their own, is just as big a killer as the pesticides on the carcass.
They used to say these when our tiger numbers crashed below 1500 before 2009, they're singing the same song now that it's doubled in a decade. That's all they've been doing, hurling filth at the boots on the ground & the conflict victims.

The cow's owner would be tracked down in less than 24 hours (in some cases someone else who had beef with the owner, may have poisoned it to get him in trouble), even quicker & more efficiently if they've received sniffer dogs yet.
He knows that well, cares little about the law at this point & would rather be in jail.

The p!ss poor forester just lost his main source of income!
Cash compensation is often not enough in this cases. India needs a planned well funded and centralised model for conflict mitigation. For example, the way cattle-lifting by lions is smoothly handled around Gir;
(07-17-2019, 12:33 PM)Rishi Wrote: The reason these ones survive is also the reason fear factor is lower on both sides. What it all boils down to is; they face no repercussions for their cattlelifting.

The locals keep all their old & male calves (which pastoral herders can afford, given the fodder is free) spread out beside & behind the main herd of breeding/milking females & calves, as lion fodder.

...but that'll again call for implementing grazing (which have always happened, but officially illegally) rights in multi-use forests of the buffers, which no doubt they'll vehemently oppose.
Otherwise India even has surplus stray/abandoned cattle that can be rounded up & handed over to them.

A new amendment to the Forest Rights Act (2006) is, atleast expected to, create the provision for assigning clearly demarcated "village forests" to each. FD & village authority are to jointly maintain the land, curb invasive species like lantenna and actively grow non-timber forest produce & grazing plants. This will hopefully decrease scouring of all the forests in the area in search of resources, harming the habitat elsewhere & increasing anthropological disturbance.
"Everything not saved will be lost."

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Germany Jeffrey Offline
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KAZIRANGA: A Royal Bengal tiger, which strayed out of flooded Kaziranga, made its way into a shop dealing with scrap on Thursday morning. 
The site is Harmoti, located beside a national highway and adjacent to the national park in Assam. 
The animal is apparently tired and hungry after battling the flood. 
Rifiqul Islam, the shop owner, said he got alarmed on hearing screams of people. "When I heard people scream, I rushed out. I saw the tiger entering my shop from the front gate. He also saw me but didn't attack me. It is now sleeping on a bed in the shop," he said. 
Forest guards have cordoned off the area. 
Forest officials said they would try and tranquillize the animal. 
In the wake of the flood, the tigers first moved towards the hills across the highway in nearby Karbi Anglong district.

The pictures have been shared by WTI (on their twitter Acct - @wti_org_india ) and their vet Dr. Shamshul Ali, Kaziranga and others are trying to tranquilize the Tiger.


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Finland Shadow Offline
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( This post was last modified: 07-18-2019, 03:47 PM by Shadow )

(07-18-2019, 11:09 AM)Rishi Wrote:
(07-18-2019, 02:29 AM)Shadow Wrote:
(07-18-2019, 02:23 AM)Pckts Wrote: Male tiger found dead in The Nilgiris. Poisoned by farmers since the Tiger was feeding on cattle. How can we sympathize with humans if they don't understand and follow the laws? Animals don't have laws, but we do. Why do the FD and govt authorities not take stringent action when we have strict laws against wildlife crime?!

How can we possibly keep losing our National Animal and pride this way?! Where are the so-called experts and brand ambassadors of heavily foreign funded and corporate backed "Save the Tiger" campaigns?? The alarming rate at which we are losing our wildlife show that these organisations running for decades are all FRAUDS!! They have done NOTHING to mitigate this crisis! All they've done is appeal for sponsorship and line their own pockets with funds from all over the world!! 
SHAME ON THEM ALL !! ???


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author

This is a good example for it, why there need to be reasonable compensations, when predators kill domestic cattle. If there isn´t some functional system, people take actions in their own hands and there is really nothing to stop it. That is harsh reality, what can´t be ignored.

I don't know where he got the text from, but that insensitive attitude by India's upper/middle class urban "online animal-lovers" living in a little world of their own, is just as big a killer as the pesticides on the carcass.
They used to say these when our tiger numbers crashed below 1500 in 2010, they're singing the same song now that it's doubled within a decade. That's all they've been doing, hurling filth at the boots on the ground & the conflict victims.

The cow's owner would be tracked down in less than 24 hours (in some cases someone else who had beef with the owner, may have poisoned it to get him in trouble), even quicker & more efficiently if they've received sniffer dogs yet.
He knows that well, cares little about the law at this point & would rather be in jail.

The p!ss poor forester just lost his main source of income!
Cash compensation is often not enough in this cases. India needs a planned well funded and centralised model for conflict mitigation. For example, the way cattle-lifting by lions is smoothly handled around Gir;
(07-17-2019, 12:33 PM)Rishi Wrote: The reason these ones survive is also the reason fear factor is lower on both sides. What it all boils down to is; they face no repercussions for their cattlelifting.
The locals keep all their old & male calves (which pastoral herders can afford, given the fodder is free) spread out beside & behind the main herd of breeding/milking females & calves, as lion fodder.

...but that'll again call for implementing grazing (which have always happened, but officially illegally) rights in multi-use forests of the buffers, which no doubt they'll vehemently oppose.
Otherwise India even has surplus stray/abandoned cattle that can be rounded up & handed over to them.

A new amendment to the Forest Rights Act (2006) is, atleast expected to, create the provision for assigning clearly demarcated "village forests" to each. FD & village authority are to jointly maintain the land, curb invasive species like lantenna and actively grow non-timber forest produce & grazing plants. This will hopefully decrease scouring of all the forests in the area in search of resources, harming the habitat elsewhere & increasing anthropological disturbance.

Yes, we call same kind of people here as "city green". They are talking about saving wildlife, which naturally is a good thing. But same time they forget in many issues all reasonability. When one wolf is shot here by official permission outside hunting season (only certain number of wolves/year, not as many as some people would like to), because lost natural fear for humans, those people are in social media complaining like wolves would be massacred without any reason. And these people mostly can´t separate a hawk from eagle if seeing such in wild. They really have no idea what it is to live in countryside and actually deal with it with such animal with family and children.

That is naturally a thing, which then gets many people angry. Those people, who actually live in the middle of wildlife, know plants, berries, fruit, wild animals etc. are treated by these city green people like they would be murderers in blood lust. Still those same people are those who produce food to these city green people and actually know what they are doing when going into the forests to do something :) That is quite a contradiction, when those who know the least cry out loudest.

For some person one cow is just a number in statistics, but as you say, for some that is main part of income and losing even one can mean, that having to watch own child to suffer, when not able to give enough food. Does that father or mother then love tiger causing it... knowing, that next cow can be dead in a few days if not doing anything. It´s so easy to say something from ivory tower, but totally different thing to face reality. Complex matters and solutions should be found asap if possible.
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United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
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( This post was last modified: 07-19-2019, 01:12 PM by BorneanTiger )

(07-18-2019, 03:45 PM)Shadow Wrote:
(07-18-2019, 11:09 AM)Rishi Wrote:
(07-18-2019, 02:29 AM)Shadow Wrote:
(07-18-2019, 02:23 AM)Pckts Wrote: Male tiger found dead in The Nilgiris. Poisoned by farmers since the Tiger was feeding on cattle. How can we sympathize with humans if they don't understand and follow the laws? Animals don't have laws, but we do. Why do the FD and govt authorities not take stringent action when we have strict laws against wildlife crime?!

How can we possibly keep losing our National Animal and pride this way?! Where are the so-called experts and brand ambassadors of heavily foreign funded and corporate backed "Save the Tiger" campaigns?? The alarming rate at which we are losing our wildlife show that these organisations running for decades are all FRAUDS!! They have done NOTHING to mitigate this crisis! All they've done is appeal for sponsorship and line their own pockets with funds from all over the world!! 
SHAME ON THEM ALL !! ???


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author

This is a good example for it, why there need to be reasonable compensations, when predators kill domestic cattle. If there isn´t some functional system, people take actions in their own hands and there is really nothing to stop it. That is harsh reality, what can´t be ignored.

I don't know where he got the text from, but that insensitive attitude by India's upper/middle class urban "online animal-lovers" living in a little world of their own, is just as big a killer as the pesticides on the carcass.
They used to say these when our tiger numbers crashed below 1500 in 2010, they're singing the same song now that it's doubled within a decade. That's all they've been doing, hurling filth at the boots on the ground & the conflict victims.

The cow's owner would be tracked down in less than 24 hours (in some cases someone else who had beef with the owner, may have poisoned it to get him in trouble), even quicker & more efficiently if they've received sniffer dogs yet.
He knows that well, cares little about the law at this point & would rather be in jail.

The p!ss poor forester just lost his main source of income!
Cash compensation is often not enough in this cases. India needs a planned well funded and centralised model for conflict mitigation. For example, the way cattle-lifting by lions is smoothly handled around Gir;
(07-17-2019, 12:33 PM)Rishi Wrote: The reason these ones survive is also the reason fear factor is lower on both sides. What it all boils down to is; they face no repercussions for their cattlelifting.
The locals keep all their old & male calves (which pastoral herders can afford, given the fodder is free) spread out beside & behind the main herd of breeding/milking females & calves, as lion fodder.

...but that'll again call for implementing grazing (which have always happened, but officially illegally) rights in multi-use forests of the buffers, which no doubt they'll vehemently oppose.
Otherwise India even has surplus stray/abandoned cattle that can be rounded up & handed over to them.

A new amendment to the Forest Rights Act (2006) is, atleast expected to, create the provision for assigning clearly demarcated "village forests" to each. FD & village authority are to jointly maintain the land, curb invasive species like lantenna and actively grow non-timber forest produce & grazing plants. This will hopefully decrease scouring of all the forests in the area in search of resources, harming the habitat elsewhere & increasing anthropological disturbance.

Yes, we call same kind of people here as "city green". They are talking about saving wildlife, which naturally is a good thing. But same time they forget in many issues all reasonability. When one wolf is shot here by official permission outside hunting season (only certain number of wolves/year, not as many as some people would like to), because lost natural fear for humans, those people are in social media complaining like wolves would be massacred without any reason. And these people mostly can´t separate a hawk from eagle if seeing such in wild. They really have no idea what it is to live in countryside and actually deal with it with such animal with family and children.

That is naturally a thing, which then gets many people angry. Those people, who actually live in the middle of wildlife, know plants, berries, fruit, wild animals etc. are treated by these city green people like they would be murderers in blood lust. Still those same people are those who produce food to these city green people and actually know what they are doing when going into the forests to do something :) That is quite a contradiction, when those who know the least cry out loudest.

For some person one cow is just a number in statistics, but as you say, for some that is main part of income and losing even one can mean, that having to watch own child to suffer, when not able to give enough food. Does that father or mother then love tiger causing it... knowing, that next cow can be dead in a few days if not doing anything. It´s so easy to say something from ivory tower, but totally different thing to face reality. Complex matters and solutions should be found asap if possible.

Interestingly, despite the fact that urbanisation would pose a threat to the natural environment, converting the habitats of tigers into towns or cities for instance (https://www.smartcitiesdive.com/ex/susta...n/1046971/), considering the fact that rural people are at the forefront in the conflict of wildlife and mankind, it seems that a shift from rural to urban living may reduce the likelihood of conflict between rural people and wildlife, according to Sanderson et al. (https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/ar...via%3Dihub, who in turn were quoted by a number of newspapers such as Asian Scientist (https://www.asianscientist.com/2019/01/i...-survival/) and Mongabay (https://news.mongabay.com/2019/02/urbani...udy-finds/)), except that the threat to tigers and wildlife would then shift to the urban people, so like I would say, ultimately people should have less children so that the global birth rate becomes less than the death rate, so that our large, expanding population stops increasing and decreases, and hopefully, that is on the way, since the global growth of the human population is generally cooling, with the exception of Africa and Oceania (https://www.worldometers.info/world-population/).
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United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
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2 tigers spotted in the area of Terangganu, northeast Malaysia, with 1 of them caught. They are suspected to be pets: https://www.nst.com.my/news/nation/2019/...perhilitanhttps://www.theborneopost.com/2019/07/19...erengganu/https://www.malaymail.com/news/malaysia/...ge/1773137




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India Rishi Online
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This incident certainly turned out to be as odd it was as unfortunate!


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"Everything not saved will be lost."

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