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India Rishi Offline
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(03-01-2019, 07:52 PM)Sanju Wrote: 67% of infestation of diseases, 19% of snake bites, 8% due to old age and 6% heart, lung, kidney disease and rest are Death due to illness. Gujarat forest dept tricking theory. All is well in Gir... 

Wait.. So where is infighting & unnatural deaths in those stats? Sure you translated correctly?
"Everything not saved will be lost."

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India Sanju Offline
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( This post was last modified: 03-01-2019, 08:41 PM by Sanju )

(03-01-2019, 08:35 PM)Rishi Wrote: Wait.. So where is infighting & unnatural deaths in those stats? Sure you translated correctly?

I'm thinking the same, where are the main aspects, but as per the translation this is it.
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India Rishi Offline
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@Sanju they released the data? If so then it should be available from other Gujarati sources.
"Everything not saved will be lost."

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India Sanju Offline
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Gujarat transport drivers, conductors spotted tiger over last two months

While a school teacher may have been the only one to provide photographic evidence of the existence of a tiger in the Sant Matro jungles of taluka, the drivers and conductors of state transport (ST) buses that ply on the Godhra-Panam Dam route had spotted the tiger over the last couple of months.

Gujarat State Road (GSRTC) buses ply at regular intervals on the route. The route passes through the area where the tiger has been moving around. One of the drivers spotted the tiger in the last week of January while others have spotted it earlier.

Maksud Tekravala, a driver, said, “I saw the tiger standing on the road in the light of my bus in the night. This was either on January 28 or January 30 when I was on duty on the route.

People had been telling us about its presence, but it was for the first time that I saw it.”


Udesinh Baria, a conductor who plies on the same route, said he had seen the tiger about two months back near Gadh village. “It stood on the side of the road for a few minutes and then walked into the trees. The passengers in the bus also saw it. There are other drivers and conductors too who have seen the tiger,” said Baria.

Another bus driver Rafiq Peerzada said that he too saw the tiger near Gadh in the morning about a month back. “The tiger was crossing the road. A man who was riding a motorcycle had also seen the tiger and had stopped on the road,” he said.
The bus crew members hold that the animal was distinctly different from a leopard and was a definitely a tiger. It seems to have sneaked into the jungles from the road on seeing the buses coming close.

And Again... after Kanha, now in Mowgli forest. @Rage2277 @Rishi @Pckts

Cannibal tiger kills & eats another in Madhya Pradesh's Pench national park

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Carcass of an adult tiger found from Pench National Park


Cannibalism among tigers claimed another big cat in Madhya Pradesh on Thursday. A day after two sub-adult tigers were killed and eaten by a cannibal tiger, carcass of an adult tiger was found from Pench National Park. The fresh case was reported from Pench National park in Seoni on Thursday where the forest patrolling squad found carcass of an adult tiger in the Khamarpani buffer zone.

"This tiger too was killed by another tiger. There were hairs and blood of another tiger in its claws indicating that a fierce battle took place at the spot leaving one dead," said Vikram Singh Parihar, field director of Pench National Park.

"Half of the tiger was eaten by the one which killed it. We don't find it uncommon. Similar incidents were reported in Kahna in the 1980s," Parihar added. However, it is not yet clear whether it's the same tiger that has killed and eaten three tigers in Kanha. Officials say Kanha and Pench are connected and have a well-protected corridor.

Tiger killing and eating only tiger is something strange

Madhya Pradesh wildlife department is likely to initiate a study on cannibalism among tigers in protected areas. Officials say tigers killing tigers is natural, but a tiger killing and eating only tiger is something strange - that too when the forest has no shortage of prey.

Two sub-adult tigers were found ripped to shreds in Kanha National Park on Tuesday. According to an official press release, a patrolling squad had spotted the carcasses at Kanhari area around 9.20am. An adult tiger was found sitting on the two kills.

Quote:In all, MP has lost six of its tigers in last few days which includes one in Gujarat and three in Kanha.

Important to address human-tiger conflict
After the tiger was found in Gujarat, officials of the Madhya Pradesh government had written to Gujarat to take care of the animal and keep a tab on its movements.
Though the exact reason for the tiger’s death is yet to be ascertained environmentalists are sus.pecting it to be a case of poisoning of the animal.

Quote:“Both states, Madhya Pradesh and Gujarat, are responsible for the death of tiger in Lunavada, Gujarat because they failed to provide protection to the tiger that was moving near villages. There is no prey base in Lunavada (Mahisagar),” Ajay Dubey, a wildlife activist who works with a non-governmental organisation ‘Prayatna’, told Mongabay-India.

“Despite the serious problem of conflict, the lack of coordination between states is the root cause of death,” he added.


*This image is copyright of its original author

A tiger was found in Gujarat after 30 years. Photo provided by Gujarat’s forest department.

In the past two decades, the issue of human-wildlife conflict has gained the attention of policymakers and conservationists. There has been a significant number of deaths of animals like tigers and elephants as well as humans in such conflicts.

According to the data of the National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA), which is India’s nodal body for work related to welfare and protection of tigers, in 2018, India recorded 100 tiger deaths. It was for the third straight year that the number of tiger deaths in India touched the 100-figure mark. The reasons for their deaths ranged from natural deaths, electrocution, poisoning to poaching and in-fighting.


Quote:Read more: Tiger deaths hit the 100-mark again, but number down from previous year


According to information provided by Mahesh Sharma, Minister of State in the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change (MoEFCC), while replying to a query in parliament, at least 137 people have been killed in a human-tiger conflict between 2015-2018 (till December 31, 2018).

To protect tigers, India had started focused efforts in the 1970s when project tiger was launched. In the past 15 years, India has seen a rise in their numbers from 1,411 in 2006 to 2,226 tigers as per the 2014 estimation. India’s tiger population is about 60 percent of the global tiger population of 3,890 tigers.

The latest assessment is expected to be released in the next few months and the population is expected to register an increase but problems like human-wildlife conflict, habitat fragmentation and poaching continue to pose danger to their survival. Right now, India has 50 tiger reserves in 18 states accounting for nearly 2.21 percent of country’s total geographical area.

What does not help the case is that a significant population of Indian tigers live outside the tiger reserve which threatens their security. The latest incident of MP’s tiger found dead in Gujarat once again highlights the dangers that tigers face outside the tiger reserves including human-wildlife conflict.

Meanwhile, the authorities claimed that everything is being done as per the protocols. “The NTCA is involved in investigating the exact reason of death of the tiger in Gujarat. We have proper protocols to follow in such cases. We are doing our best to minimise the cases of human-tiger conflicts,” said NTCA sources.
When Need turns to Greed, our Extinction happens.
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United States smedz Offline
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( This post was last modified: 03-02-2019, 08:03 PM by Rishi )

Check this out! Apparently, an "extinct" leopard has been spotted in Taiwan. They've been considered to be extinct in Taiwan for over 30 years! So this is big news!  

https://www.iflscience.com/plants-and-an...years-ago/

Quote:A long-thought-extinct clouded leopard being spotted by multiple witnesses alive and well(?) in Taiwan.

A specimen of Formosan clouded leopard in the National Taiwan Museum c. 2013. SSR2000/Creative Commons

*This image is copyright of its original author

The Formosan clouded leopard (Neofelis nebulosa brachyura) is a subspecies of clouded leopard endemic to the island of Taiwan. With no confirmed sightings of it in the wild since 1983, it was declared extinct in 2013.
However, according to Taiwan News, Taiwanese scholars are reluctant to remove it from the endangered species list thanks to rare but occasional sightings, like the recent ones by a group of villagers who say they spotted the elusive animal on two separate occasions in 2018.

@smedz Insert the main news contrac content too, not just a link.
"Those who do what they must do are like fire, they fear nothing. Those who don't are like rabbits, for they have much to fear.
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India Sanju Offline
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@Rishi @Lycaon 

Claims on cub’s pugmarks keep foresters busy

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Pugmarks of tiger cub that was found in a farm in Signali village (original photo)

The death of the tiger in Mahisagar district has not stopped claims of the striped big cats being spotted in the area dying down.

The forest department has now been sent into a tizzy after claims that pugmarks of a tiger cub were spotted in a farm in Signali village.

While the forest department has said that it was unlikely that the pugmarks were of a tiger cub, the residents insist that proper verification should be done before reaching to a conclusion. Trap cameras have now been installed in the area where the pug marks were spotted earlier this week.

Owner of the farm in Signali village Dipendrasinh Rathore said that the pugmarks were small and of a cub. “I have informed the forest department regarding these. They believe that these may be of a leopard cub, but we have installed cameras to spot the animal,” said Rathore.

Rathore pointed out that there were many in surrounding villages who had claimed that they had seen an entire tiger family with cubs. “The forest department had not believed this earlier, but eventually a teacher photographed it,” said Rathore.

Pug marks creates confusion to forest department got information about the issue

Based on other report, Primary pug mark identification, the pugmark is not of a leopard but a TIGER CUB. Pug mark found near Lunawada- Ghodra road, Shingani Hills Lake behind the Jogmaya hotel. The Farm area is little bit swampy so that pug marks are visible and the FD identified it as Tiger cub "primarily".

Talking to the Lunawada forest officer Rohith Patel, he said that: "Deependar singh informed that the foot print is found in that area, so we rushed to that area to investigate. Pug mark is 12 cm in length and of the size of human palm. (Sorry, I didn't understand the rest of measurements to translate)

*This image is copyright of its original author

Deputy conservator of forest of Mahisagar district R M Parmar said that the pugmarks were likely to be of a leopard. “A cub cannot stray away long distances from its mother. A highway passes near the area where the pugmarks were spotted and tigers would usually avoid such places,” said Parmar.

Picture of recently dead "Mangla Bava"

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When Need turns to Greed, our Extinction happens.
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Leopard not tiger cub left pugmarks in Signali village

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The pugmarks that were earlier suspected to be of tiger cub


The exercise by the forest department to ascertain if tiger cubs were indeed moving around in the area where the dead tiger was found earlier in Mahisagar district has only led the department to a leopard. The exercise was taken up after a farmer insisted that the department should verify if the pugmarks in the farm.

While the forest department had prima facie said that it was unlikely that the pugmarks spotted in the farm in Signali village were of a tiger cub, the farmer and others insisted that proper verification should be done before reaching to a conclusion. Trap cameras were installed in the area where the pugmarks were spotted and personnel of the department were asked to increase vigil in the area.

Sources in the forest department said that on Saturday night, the cameras captured a leopard cub in the same area. They added that the claims of sighting of a tiger at other locations have also not led to anything fruitful so far.

@Lycaon Disappointed
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( This post was last modified: 03-05-2019, 11:48 AM by BorneanTiger )

(02-26-2019, 11:54 AM)Sanju Wrote: Kuno is approved as Lion reserve and ready to recieve Lions, CM writes to PM

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*This image is copyright of its original author

Quote:Cheetah going to be welcomed in Nauradehi WLS and Kuno NP ready for the Asiatic lions
Chief Minister Kamal Nath urges Prime Minister Narendra Modi to give approval and intervene in this matter and direct them to send Gir Lion in Palpur
@Lycaon @Wolverine
Madhya Pradesh can once again going to become cheetah's Kingdom. The Cheetah was extinct 72 years ago from the state.


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Madhya Pradesh Chief Minister Kamal Nath with Prime Minister Narendra Modi (File photo)

CM Kamal Nath has resumed his efforts to bring the Lion to Madhya Pradesh from Gujarat.

National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA) is once again preparing to settle cheetah here. This is the reason why the NTCA implementing Supreme Court orders  to transfer the Cheetah of Namibia by selecting Nauradehi for it.

Madhya Pradesh forest department had notified Kuno as a ‘national park’ in compliance with the last condition imposed by a Supreme Court-appointed committee for ‘translocation of Asiatic lions from Gir in Gujarat.’

The notification was published on December 14, minutes after Congress announced Kamal Nath as the new chief minister of the state. Nath had promised officials to take up the matter towards a logical conclusion. Shivraj never spoke on this issue publicly considering Modi’s possessiveness for Gir lions.

On the other hand, after the change of government in the state, preparations for the renewal of the Lion in Palpur National Park have been started. Writing a letter to give permission for transferring lions to Madhya Pradesh, the ball has been thrown in the court of the central government.


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At the sixth meeting of the expert committee on translocation of Asiatic lions, the MP government was asked to notify the area by February 2017, but competent authorities kept it pending knowing the then government’s stand on the subject, said sources.

In January 2017, Gujarat’s forest department had placed its objections before the 12-member committee and demanded that 36 studies be completed before the endangered Gir lions can be transferred to MP.

Issues like prey base, habitat, vegetation and weather are said to be conducive for shifting the lions to Kuno sanctuary. The MP forest department had promised to complete all formal processes of declaring Kuno as a ‘national park’ by the end of February. The expert committee had visited Kuno in December 2017.

After spending nearly five hours at the sanctuary, the panel members had found the atmosphere in Kuno-Palpur suitable for shifting of lions. Gujarat, too, could not question much on MP’s preparedness to host the lions, sources said. While MP won the eight-year-long legal battle with Gujarat in 2013, the latter had been dilly-dallying on compliance.

MP government circles had gone to the extent of suggesting that they were not averse to retaining the tag of ‘Gir' or ‘Gujarat' to identify the relocated lions at their new home in Kuno-Palpur.
If everything goes fine then the wildlife lovers of the state can get double happiness soon along with Cheetah.

In fact, there has been a long dispute between the two states for bringing the Lions to Madhya Pradesh from the Gir Sanctuary located in Gujarat. After going to the Supreme Court and ordering the transfer of lions, the Gujarat government imposed restrictions on lion-friendly arrangements.

The Union Ministry of Environment and Forests expressed concern over the fact that the lion is on the verge of extinction. Therefore it is important to build their second Lion reserve. If the Asiatic lion was tied in the same place then this species would be extinct.

Now the State Government has written a letter to the Central Government and requested to give permission to send the lion, giving details of arrangements made in Palpur. It has been mentioned in the letter that with the increase of the area of Kuno, it has been declared as National Park. Also, the preliminary conditions set out to bring the lion have been completed.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Demand for bringing lions into Palpur reserve by RSS symposium

RSS Mohan Bhagwat Keshav Kuti Jabalpur Organized Forest and Environment Seminar for Asiatic-Lion

Rashtriya Swayam Sevak Sangh chief Sarasangh Chowk Mohan Bhagwat's organized a seminar on Monday, February 25, in the Keshav Kuti Jabalpur, RSS Forest and Environment.

In this seminar, former MLA and Environmentalist Dr. Nishith Patel demanded transfer of Asiatic Lion to Kuno National Park. Shri Bhagwat requested that the Central Ministry of Forest and Environment and the Government of Gujarat should be Instructed for speedy action in this regard.

http://www.newindianexpress.com/nation/2...43720.html
http://theindianawaaz.com/kamal-nath-ask...a-pradesh/
http://www.uniindia.com/lion-issue-mp-cm...11724.html

Mr. Patel also informed Mr. Bhagwat that the recommendations of the Indian Forest Organisms and the Committee constituted for the transfer of Kuno National Park have also been implemented by the then BJP Government of Madhya Pradesh. Large amount of money spent by the state government on this.


*This image is copyright of its original author

Dr. Nishith Patel, former MLA and Environmental expert, said in the seminar that the Union Ministry of Environment and Forests has expressed concern over this matter and said that it is necessary to build a second reserve for the endangered Asiatic Lion. If the Asiatic lion is kept in one place then it will get some genetic disease and abnormalities due to "Inbreeding" then this species will become extinct. Kuno National Park of Madhya Pradesh is the most suitable place for the Asiatic Lions on the earth.

-------------- 
Area double
Along with displaced and rehabilitated 24 villages (1543 families or households in which most of the inhabitants were Saharia tribal people and small percentage were Jatav, Brahmin, Gujjar, Kushwaha and Yadav) in Palpur National Park, now its area has increased to 800 sq.km by Madhya Pradesh govt. Earlier its area was half of it. A pleasant atmosphere without Human disturbance like in Gir  has been created for lions.

The letter sent to the Center has been told that a Committee of Indian Forest Organizations and Expert Committees of wildlife experts was constituted to resolve the objections raised by the Gujarat government. On whose recommendations, all the conditions have been fulfilled, which were obstructing the transfer of lions.

The Wildlife Institute of India ( WII ) has given green signal while expressing satisfaction over all the arrangements.

This is the case
Work is being done on the project to set up Asiatic lions in Kuno Palpur since 1993. Madhya Pradesh government became active only after the recommendation of sending them to other parts for their species survival due to infectious dreadful diseases or natural calamities.

In 2003, the reserve was ready for lions.

But the Gujarat government refused to send them. Since then, this dispute has come up.
-------------------

NOC found to bring cheetahs

Quote:The NOC (Nodal) International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) has been given to India for the conservation of extinct cheetahs in the Nauridehi WLS, located in the Sagar division of the "Pradesh" state.

The NTCA is taking action  of proposal in Supreme Court decision to relocate cheetahs from Namibia.

NTCA told the court that the experts team has studied the impact of climate change, biodiversity and sustainable development and they are fully satisfied.

Quote:Wildlife Institute Dehradun is collaborating on this proposal to rehabilitate the species of cheetah in the country.

It is known that Cheetah was last seen in India 72 years ago. The government tried to save it that it had already died in 1947.

After this, there was no trace of cheetah's presence in the survey conducted across the country. So, five years later, in 1952, it was declared as extinct. Namibia is the one of the few countries in the world where cheetah is found.

Madhya Pradesh's Tiger found in Gujarat.
Tiger disappeared from Madhya Pradesh for two years found in Gujarat. It has been revealed from photographs. The Forest Officers of the state wrote a letter to the Gujarat government and said to keep our tiger in safe custody.

According to the officials, the tiger got out of Kanha National Park and the forests reached Gujarat. Presently this tiger is in the shrinking forests of Gujarat. Whose continuous report is being recorded.

According to sources, in January 2017, a tiger was seen roaming in the hills of Nagda. Now it is revealed to be in the Gujarat forest area. It is reported that this tiger has reached Gujarat by traveling 300 kilometers distance through dense and hostile human matrix.

One concern that I have about Namibian cheetahs being translocated to India is that it may be that like lions, cheetahs in Southern Africa belong to a different subspecies to cheetahs in Northern Africa and Asia, and that North African cheetahs may be more closely related to the Asiatic cheetah, in the same way that North African lions would be related to Asiatic lions, like I mentioned here (https://wildfact.com/forum/topic-cheetah...ht=cheetah): https://repository.si.edu/bitstream/hand...sAllowed=y

"... the divergence times between these lineages are very recent (Charruau et al. 2011), e.g. 32,000-67,000 ya between jubatus and venaticus, and 16,000-72,000 ya between jubatus and soemmeringii, and the inclusion of ancient DNA samples from north Africa and southwest Asia blurred the distinction between north African and Asian cheetahs, suggesting isolation by distance. It is possible that there are only two subspecies of cheetah; northern (venaticus) and southern/ eastern (jubatus), or perhaps none if further more comprehensive sampling of museum specimens is carried out."
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India Sanju Offline
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( This post was last modified: 03-05-2019, 12:48 PM by Sanju )

@BorneanTiger Yes, you are right, It is better to relocate Northeast African cheetah soemmeringi or Northwest African cheetah hecki when venaticus is not available but Bharath might not have good relation with those countries (North African) where as Namibia cheetah population is good which readily accepted proposal or request to donate some cheetahs for India to which other countries may reject and negotiate.

Apart from that, when the original subspecies or closely relocated subspecies are not available, we have to look for the basal ancestral strain which gave rise to all modern cheetah subspecies i.e.., Southeast African cheetah (jubatus jubatus). So scientists selected that, we don't have a choice, it is a still cheetah siding towards IUCN norms.
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No end to lions death in Gujarat: Two more cubs die

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Earlier last month, two lions, a lioness and a cub were found dead in and around the Gir forest, the only abode of asian lions

Two lion cubs were found dead in Visavadar range of Gujarat's Gir forest on Tuesday, a senior official said.

Preliminary probe has revealed the two cubs, around five months old, may have been killed by a male lion in a territorial fight to establish dominance, said DT Vasavada, chief conservator of forests, Junagadh Wildlife Circle.

Earlier last month, two lions, a lioness and a cub were found dead in and around the Gir forest, the only abode of Asiatic lions.

During the Gujarat assembly session held last month, the state government had said 204 lions, comprising 110 adults and 94 cubs, had died in and around Gir forest in the last two years as on December, 2018.

@Lycaon
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( This post was last modified: 03-09-2019, 04:40 PM by Sanju )

Gujarat: Did starvation kill the roving tiger?

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Tiger

Did the sole male tiger that was spotted in Mahisagar but was later found dead under mysterious condition die of starvation?

Those in the know said that starvation could be a possibility. "From Feb 16 onwards upto Feb 26, the day it was found dead the officials did not see any kill," said an official in the know.
"The department had after the death came to light checked for any loss of cattle in the villages surrounding the forest area but found nothing. The carcass of any wild animals were also not found leading to the possibility that it could have died of starvation," said the official.

The top department officials however said at this point of time it was too early to speculate. "The post mortem report was inconclusive and three sets of samples were sent for further investigation. The reports are not yet in and so we cannot say anything as of now," said Chief Conservator of Forest Vadodara, S K Srivastava.
"Poaching had been ruled out. So that leaves just a few possibilities like starving, snake bite, disease or poisoning," said Srivastava.

The body of the tiger was found in a decomposed state in forests of Kantar Village some 70 km from Godhra and close to Mahisagar. The body was spotted by the field staff that had been tracking the animal since it was found. It was found three to four days after its death.

The pattern of the tiger's stripes led the post-mortem panel, formed to probe its death, to conclude that it was the same animal that was captured on the camera trap sometimes back.

An Awful End
The body of the tiger was found in a decomposed state in forests of Kantar village some 70 km from Godhra and close to Mahisagar.

Tiger that trekked from MP to Gujarat died of starvation: Post-mortem report (I still doubt it Poisoned by locals)
Gujarat forest officials confirmed here on Friday.

"The preliminary PM report, however, has revealed no presence of food in the tiger's stomach which is indicative that tiger died of starvation," said Saxena.

Top sources in the forest department said that viscera reports of the tiger which have been sent to specialised laboratories in Hyderabad, Anand and Gandhinagar will reveal if the tiger had stopped eating because of some illness.
When Need turns to Greed, our Extinction happens.
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United States smedz Offline
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(03-09-2019, 12:40 PM)Sanju Wrote: Gujarat: Did starvation kill the roving tiger?

*This image is copyright of its original author
Tiger

Did the sole male tiger that was spotted in Mahisagar but was later found dead under mysterious condition die of starvation?

Those in the know said that starvation could be a possibility. "From Feb 16 onwards upto Feb 26, the day it was found dead the officials did not see any kill," said an official in the know.
"The department had after the death came to light checked for any loss of cattle in the villages surrounding the forest area but found nothing. The carcass of any wild animals were also not found leading to the possibility that it could have died of starvation," said the official.

The top department officials however said at this point of time it was too early to speculate. "The post mortem report was inconclusive and three sets of samples were sent for further investigation. The reports are not yet in and so we cannot say anything as of now," said Chief Conservator of Forest Vadodara, S K Srivastava.
"Poaching had been ruled out. So that leaves just a few possibilities like starving, snake bite, disease or poisoning," said Srivastava.

The body of the tiger was found in a decomposed state in forests of Kantar Village some 70 km from Godhra and close to Mahisagar. The body was spotted by the field staff that had been tracking the animal since it was found. It was found three to four days after its death.

The pattern of the tiger's stripes led the post-mortem panel, formed to probe its death, to conclude that it was the same animal that was captured on the camera trap sometimes back.

An Awful End
The body of the tiger was found in a decomposed state in forests of Kantar village some 70 km from Godhra and close to Mahisagar.

Tiger that trekked from MP to Gujarat died of starvation: Post-mortem report (I still doubt it Poisoned by locals)
Gujarat forest officials confirmed here on Friday.

"The preliminary PM report, however, has revealed no presence of food in the tiger's stomach which is indicative that tiger died of starvation," said Saxena.

Top sources in the forest department said that viscera reports of the tiger which have been sent to specialised laboratories in Hyderabad, Anand and Gandhinagar will reveal if the tiger had stopped eating because of some illness.
Oh man, I know life in the wild isn't easy but...LET US HAVE THIS MOMENT MOTHER NATURE!!!
"Those who do what they must do are like fire, they fear nothing. Those who don't are like rabbits, for they have much to fear.
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Why MP is one of India’s top tiger states

The MP forest department was fortunate to have committed forest officers with long and stable tenures. For example, between 1970 and 2007, the Kanha National Park had only four park directors. Second, unlike many states, the forests have had decent political support which helped committed officers to create a large number of protected areas since the 1970s.


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Wildlife experts say that Madhya Pradesh has the potential to have more tigers and better quality wildlife tourism. To ensure that, the forest department needs more staff, including senior officials who are interested in wildlife management. (HT File Photo )
[*]

The Panna Tiger Reserve (PTR) in Madhya Pradesh (MP) is one of the state’s most beautiful forests. Apart from its dense deciduous foliage, the 576- square kilometre park has a spectacular landscape marked by gorges and plateaus, and the free-flowing river Ken, one of the 16 perennial rivers in the state.

The reserve’s idyllic existence, however, received a massive jolt in 2009 when the state realised that the park had lost its entire tiger population (at least 24) to poaching and poisoning, and destruction of forest habitat by evicted encroachers. A few had reached the end of their 15-year lifespan and died of natural causes or illness. The tigers were lost between 2003 and 2008.
The news was an embarrassment for MP, which is one of India’s top tiger states, forcing the government to devise a strategy for the PTR. It decided to reintroduce big cats in Panna; the first one came on March 3, 2009. Today, Panna has more than 47 tigers. According to the 2014 tiger census, MP has 308. The National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA) is expected to release a new census report in April, and foresters in MP are hoping to have an even better tally this time around.

The loss of tigers from Rudyard Kipling country (the state’s big four tiger reserves — Pench, Bandhavgarh, Kanha and Panna — once formed a single natural corridor) was a taint in an otherwise good record of the state’s wildlife conservation history. The Kanha National Park was declared a wildlife sanctuary in 1935 and the state enacted its own MP National Parks Act in 1955. Six of MP’s 10 parks are today part of the prestigious Project Tiger, which began in 1973. The state’s parks have also fared consistently in evaluations. According to a 2014 Management Effectiveness Evaluation process, a global framework to evaluate the performance of protected areas, MP topped the charts; the parks have also done well in ecotourism and parkwise grading done by the NTCA.

There are several reasons why MP has consistently done well over the years, notwithstanding the Panna debacle. First, the MP forest department had several committed forest officers with long and stable tenures. For example, between 1970 and 2007, the Kanha National Park had only four park directors.

Second, unlike many states, the forests have had strong political support, which helped committed officers to create a large number of protected areas since the 1970s. Almost all good uninterrupted forests were converted at a time when there was not much conflict between parks and the pressures of development. Third, the state had a first-mover advantage when it came to wildlife tourism. It was on the tourism map much before modern tourism started because of royal hunting expeditions. The state took advantage of this public memory, and was one of the first to create a directorate of ecotourism in the early 1990s. With tourists came funds and infrastructure, and, luckily for MP, many businesspeople, such as resort owners, participated in the development process in a sustainable manner.

During a reporting trip in Panna in 2009, I stayed at one of the jungle camps on the river Ken, and my understanding of the conservation issues was enriched by the inputs of not just the camp’s owners but the local staff too. This involvement of stakeholders — businessmen and the local community — is critical in any conservation process. In fact, MP was one of the early adopters of the joint forest management scheme, which tried to integrate the local people. Last, but not the least, the protection provided to wildlife, especially in protected areas, has been better than in many other jungles of India.
Thanks to its good wildlife management, MP earns well from wildlife tourism. According to the forest department, the state earned Rs 27.54 crore in 2017-18 from just the gate receipts of the parks. And it’s not just the state: Local people are one of the principal beneficiaries from direct employment and non-salaried employment, as guides and safari vehicle owners; 80% of the lodge employees are from local communities. In The Value of Wildlife Tourism for Conservation & Communities (2017), conservation biologist, RS Chundawat, writes: “Wildlife tourism in MP is already proving to be an important tool in funding parks, in nature awareness, in rural poverty reduction and rural uplift, but some key actions are needed to realise its greater potential for sustainable development and wildlife protection”.

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Wildlife experts say that MP has the potential to have more tigers and better quality wildlife tourism. To ensure that, the forest department needs more staff, including senior officials who are interested in wildlife management. In addition, it needs to first protect the main actor — the tiger — by more intensive foot patrolling and surveillance of the parks, conservation of not just core areas but also buffer areas and corridors (the state has one of the most fragmented tiger corridors), expanding the tiger base to the western parts of the state and making the local communities a stakeholder in the process.

“While the tigers are safe in the protected areas, the strength of MP’s status as a top tiger state can be bolstered further if it ensures safety of tigers in the buffer and wildlife corridors. Otherwise, parks are just big zoos,” said a wildlife scientist, who did not wish to be named.
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Pug marks found in central Gujarat of leopard: Forest Dept

Lunavada, Mar 15 (UNI) The Forest department on Friday said that the pug mark of a wild beast found near Signali forest in Mahisagar district of central Gujarat, where a tiger was found last month, was not that of a tigress/tiger, but of a leopard.


DCF Mahisagar R M Parmar and RFO R B Patel said that the night vision cameras installed in the area have also captured the pictures of a full grown leopard.

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( This post was last modified: 03-16-2019, 11:13 AM by Sanju )

Gir Lioness mauled a man (Rambhai) working in Garden...

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Lion attacks farmer in Kodinar village

A lion attacked a farmer on Friday noon in Harmadia village of Koidnar taluka in Gir Sonath district. According to forest department, Rambhai Vara (38) was working in his mango orchard when the lion attacked him.

Assistant conservator of forest D P Vagela said, “There is drain near the orchard and the lion was passing from there. Suddenly it attacked the farmer who sustained injuries on his back.” Vara was shifted to hospital where he was kept under observation because of excessive bleeding. His health is said to be stable.
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