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Asiatic Lion - Data, Pictures & Videos

United States Pckts Offline
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PC credit: Bushan Pandya
THE KING ON PRAWL

The whole forest becomes full of life and really looks different when the king starts walking!

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author
"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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United States Pckts Offline
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I didn't notice but I think the injured male 


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Is this male just healed up

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What do you guys think?
"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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Canada Shardul Offline
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Nah, the second male looks a lot younger. color of their mane is different. They might be related though.
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United States Pckts Offline
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I just thought the scar matched and attributed the wet, shaggy mane to probably blood and other fluids from the fight it had with some sort of animal.
"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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United States TheLioness Offline
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Yeah looks like two different males, the older one seems to have a skinnier muzzle, a few more scars on his nose and around the eyes. The second make has longer and more whiskers as well, the other male does not seem to have very many and or many have fallen out or cut short somehow. I think the second one also, the spot on his forehead is an indent, not a scar, it looks like to me anyways, lots of lion have a indent right there on the head :)
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Greece LionKiss Offline
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is it possible Lions and Tigers to live in the same area?,
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United States Pckts Offline
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(03-15-2016, 03:27 PM)LionKiss Wrote: is it possible Lions and Tigers to live in the same area?,

Possible?
No body can answer this question since it's never been documented in the wild.

My personal opinion....
"Same area" meaning the same territory?
No, its the same as any other big cat, they need set territories, you may see overlaps of territory and I see know reason why they couldn't share overlapping territories. But obviously if they run across each other, a fight will ensue. But if one is able to get the upper hand and the other learns to give way to the dominate cat "this can go either way" ( depends on personalities, size of coalitions, specific cats etc.) Then maybe they could find a balance.

I don't know enough about the Gir Terrain compared to the rest of India but maybe somebody here could explain the differences, if any?
If there are no real differences in terrain then I think hypothetically, they could coexist.
"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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Argentina Tshokwane Offline
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Ishan Pathak:
I, by all means now, can die peacefully. 

Asiatic Lions mating.. @Sasan Gir National Park, Gujarat


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‘Like night-watchmen they patrol the dark nights; marching with intent and chasing all those unwanted into the shadows…those that do not run are removed’
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Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
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( This post was last modified: 03-26-2016, 02:42 AM by GrizzlyClaws )

Their physical appearance is closer to the lions from the West & Southwest Africa.
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Argentina Tshokwane Offline
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Rishit Sheth:
stealthy & muscular

the king of kings
Asiatic Lion
Gir National Park

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‘Like night-watchmen they patrol the dark nights; marching with intent and chasing all those unwanted into the shadows…those that do not run are removed’
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United States Pckts Offline
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( This post was last modified: 05-10-2018, 06:46 PM by Rishi )

Pic Credit: Pradeep Singh

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United Kingdom Sully Offline
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A visit to Gir/Girnar - the home of Asiatic Lions

Another very important and must visit place of Gujarat. In fact this is the only place where one gets to view wild Asiatic Lions.

Gujarat state government has take great and care of these beasts and brought them back from extinction. There were just 180 left in 1984 and today there are 411+.

I was planning to visit since 2012 and managed to implement the plan this year in May along with a great photographer friend.

Following are the images from the tip:

Standing tall: The Lion King


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King trying to get hold of a fly


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Taking a dirt bath


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Bruised but not broken


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Afternoon siesta by lake side


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You guys gotta leave me alone


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A honey eye buzzard


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Jungle crow


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A Monitor Lizard


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A cattle herder trying to cool off his buffaloes


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Posted by NaveenKumar Reddy
"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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( This post was last modified: 05-10-2018, 06:12 PM by Rishi )

Something new I have never seen before:





A lioness, and after an huge asiatic lion draging the corpse of a big antelope, perhaps a nilgai.
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United Kingdom Sully Offline
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A young male Lion in Gir

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Lion cubs sit with one of the mothers as the other one goes out hunting

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A lion cub sleeps in the shade of a tree

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Lions in the shade of a large ficus

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A Jackal tries to catch winged termites that emerged after a downpour

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Lioness
"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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United Kingdom Sully Offline
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The Lions of Gujarat…and how to get scalped by a Leopard in the Moonlight
March 21, 2012 by Justin Huggler 2 Comments


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Lion in Gir (Photo: Justin Huggler)
“Lions?” I said. “In India? Don’t you mean tigers?”
“No,” my friend said. “They have lions in Gujarat. The last surviving Asiatic lions in the wild. And we can see them on safari.”
Now, I don’t have much luck on safari. I’ve been to tiger reserves across India, and never seen a tiger. But chance encounters with wild animals, that’s another story. Once, near the Syria-Lebanon border, I woke to a wolf howling right outside my window. Driving through north Bengal late at night, I had to stop for a baby elephant crossing the road. I saw all these little lights around me in the forest, and realised it was an entire herd of elephants waiting their turn to cross, and they were all looking at me.
So, when we arrived at Gir, last refuge of the Asiatic lion, long after dark, I was all for waiting till morning to look around. But my friend wanted to explore. The lodge where we were staying was right inside the jungle, the air was heavy with scent, and there was a full moon. Two young men who worked at the hotel said they’d come with us.
“Don’t worry,” my friend said. “They’re locals, they say it’s fine.”
“Are you sure?” I said. “They look like kids.” One of them brought a large stick. We left the gates of the compound behind.The two locals led the way, I brought up the rear. There was a noise in the trees. Something big, moving fast. One of the locals swung a torch. The light danced off moving leaves and branches. The young man with the stick came back towards us, wide-eyed.
“Leopard,” he said, excited.  I’ve heard about leopards: one wandered into a city in Assam recently and scalped a man in broad daylight. Tore his scalp off. My friend was scornful of my nervousness, but agreed to call off our midnight walk.
The next day, with a guide and the relative safety of an open top jeep, we set off again. It wasn’t hard to find the lions, there was a big male sitting nonchalantly at the side of the road, practically posing for the jeeploads of tourists. A tracker offered to take us to see lionesses and cubs: walking on foot ahead of us, he guided our jeep off the main road. He walked up to within a few feet of the lionesses and stood there calmly.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Lions in Gir (Photo: Justin HUggler)
“Isn’t it dangerous for you?” I asked from the jeep.
“Not with the lions,” he said. “It’s the leopards that attack.”
“To the lions we’re just stupid apes, not even worth attacking,” said my friend.
That’s the thing about the lions of Gir, they don’t see humans as a threat. Once, the Asiatic lion population stretched from India across the Middle East as far west as Greece and the Balkans: they are the lions of the ancient Greek legends. But today they are extinct everywhere except this one corner of India. And yet they are one of the great conservation success stories.
In 1913, there were only 20 lions left in Gir. By 2005, there were 359 lions, and the numbers keep on growing. In 2010, there were 411.
India’s tigers get all the attention. They’re the pin-ups of conservation. Project Tiger is probably the most famous conservation scheme in the world — and one of the biggest failures, considering the way tiger numbers are falling. But most people outside India have never heard of Gir or its lions.
Gir gives the lie to those who suggest that India is somehow incapable, because of endemic corruption or lack of official will, of preserving its endangered species. There must be lessons that can be drawn from Gir’s success.
But I fear at least part of the reason for the lions’ survival is prosaically simple, it is the same reason they are unafraid of humans: no one is hunting them.
Conservation began in Gir in the 1870s when the Nawab of Junagadh, the princely ruler of the area, issued strict restrictions on the hunting of lions.
Today there aren’t many lion hunters left in the world, just the odd crazed fool. But there are still plenty of tiger hunters.
People don’t believe lion bones will cure arthritis, lion fat will treat rheumatism or lion brain will cure pimples. But adherents of traditional Chinese medicine believe those things about tiger parts, and there is a lucrative black market. Now there are alarming reports that tiger numbers have fallen so low that the Chinese medicine industry is turning to lion parts as a substitute.
If you or your children never see a tiger in the wild, it will be the fault of the insecure man who thinks eating tiger penis will improve his virility, and everyone else who believes this hocus pocus medicine is worth killing off an entire species.
And yes, I think we should take it personally.
- See more at: http://www.justinhuggler.com/2012/03/21/...MOTiR.dpuf

"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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