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Animal News (Except Bigcats)

Germany Lycaon Offline
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@BorneanTiger 

Fingers crossed for arabian leopards rediscovery in the U.A.E
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India Sanju Offline
Indian
*****
( This post was last modified: 04-18-2019, 11:32 AM by Sanju )

Actually these days I'm not sharing anything in the forum (or any other social media platform like fb/twitter/quora) except in some threads and sharing in it upto some extent due to lack of time which is the thing that I don't have with lot of works.

Anyway I couldn't resist this from sharing (I saw this on that day but didn't share)...

Pretty depressing.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Gone!

At the same time the last female Yangtze  Softshell Turtle died.

We place a ridiculously skewed value on objects that are far from essential to our (Humans) survival yet watch as ecosystems rapidly degrade to the point of collapse - at what cost to humanity ?

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-4793...2RFKiFB7lw


*This image is copyright of its original author

China turtle death: One of last four known Yangtze giant softshells dies

The Yangtze giant softshell turtles thrive in muddy water and can weigh up to 90 kg (200 pounds)

The Last Giant Turtle Of Her Kind Just Passed Away

This is what extinction looks like.

One of the world's rarest turtles, a Yangtze giant softshell, has died in China, leaving just three known survivors of the species.

The female turtle (Rafetus swinhoei) died in Suzhou zoo in southern China.

Quote:Experts had tried to artificially inseminate the creature, which was over 90 years old, for a fifth time shortly before she died.

The species has suffered from hunting, overfishing and the destruction of its habitat.

The female Yangtze giant softshell turtle passed away at the Suzhou Shangfangshan Forest Zoo in China, where she has lived since 2008. She was put under anesthesia during a fifth attempt to artificially inseminate her, a procedure that people hoped would help save her species from extinction. This time, she never woke up.

Quote:With just three male Yangtze giant softshell turtles left, the death of the last female makes the species functionally extinct.


One male, estimated to be more than 100 years old, is left in the Chinese zoo | while two other turtles live in the wild in Vietnam. The elusive nature of the turtle means it has been difficult to identify the gender of the pair.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Several attempts at artificial insemination had taken place in the hope of continuing the species, but they all failed

Local staff and international experts had attempted to artificially inseminate the female 24 hours before she died on Saturday afternoon.

They said there were no complications from the operation and she had been in fine health after the procedure, but deteriorated the next day.

The cause of her death is being investigated and the turtle's ovarian tissue was collected for future research.

"It is tragic that the only known female of this species has died," the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) wrote in a statement, "but the real tragedy here is that this species has been decimated to near extinction by hunting and habitat destruction."

The female was first brought to the zoo in hopes that she would successfully mate with a 100-year-old male Yangtze giant softshell in residence there. But the couple never managed to reproduce naturally. That's when conservationists decided to try artificial insemination. The female underwent several attempted insemination procedures that failed to produce viable eggs before she died during the fifth.

“Sadly, this time the female turtle did not recover normally as she had in the past and she died despite 24 hours of nonstop emergency care," WCS wrote.

But there's a faint glimmer of hope: The species is famously elusive in the wild, so it's possible there's still a female hiding somewhere in the forests of China and Vietnam — it's just a matter of keeping her habitat safe and finding her.

"Scientists hope that this species can still be saved by working in conjunction with partners in China and with the Vietnamese government where two individuals of this turtle species, whose sex has not been determined, are known to be in the wild," WCS wrote.

You can help prevent turtles from going extinct by making a donation to the Turtle Survival Alliance.



But there's a faint glimmer of hope: The species is famously elusive in the wild, so it's possible there's still a female hiding somewhere in the forests of China and Vietnam — it's just a matter of keeping her habitat safe and finding her.

"Scientists hope that this species can still be saved by working in conjunction with partners in China and with the Vietnamese government where two individuals of this turtle species, whose sex has not been determined, are known to be in the wild," WCS wrote.
When Need turns to Greed, our Extinction happens.
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India Sanju Offline
Indian
*****

Gorillas as long as they don't feel threatened or challenged for dominance, they are sensitive and docile beings. Along with that, these rangers are daily visitors for them.

Me and my pri-mates! Anti-poaching ranger's extraordinary selfies with two wild gorillas that look almost HUMAN in Congo national park
  • Virunga, in the Democratic Republic of Congo, has 600 dedicated rangers 
  • Latest picture garnered 12 thousand likes and 14 thousand shares on Facebook
  • All of the rangers go through an extensive six-month training regime

*This image is copyright of its original author
When Need turns to Greed, our Extinction happens.
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United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
Member
**

(04-17-2019, 11:45 PM)Sanju Wrote: Actually these days I'm not sharing anything in the forum (or any other social media platform like fb/twitter/quora) except in some threads and sharing in it  upto some extent due to lack of time which is the thing that I don't have with lot of works.

Anyway I couldn't resist this from sharing (I saw this on that day but didn't share)...

Pretty depressing.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Gone!

At the same time the last female Yangtze  Softshell Turtle died.

We place a ridiculously skewed value on objects that are far from essential to our (Humans) survival yet watch as ecosystems rapidly degrade to the point of collapse - at what cost to humanity ?

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-4793...2RFKiFB7lw


*This image is copyright of its original author

China turtle death: One of last four known Yangtze giant softshells dies

The Yangtze giant softshell turtles thrive in muddy water and can weigh up to 90 kg (200 pounds)

The Last Giant Turtle Of Her Kind Just Passed Away

This is what extinction looks like.

One of the world's rarest turtles, a Yangtze giant softshell, has died in China, leaving just three known survivors of the species.

The female turtle (Rafetus swinhoei) died in Suzhou zoo in southern China.

Quote:Experts had tried to artificially inseminate the creature, which was over 90 years old, for a fifth time shortly before she died.

The species has suffered from hunting, overfishing and the destruction of its habitat.

The female Yangtze giant softshell turtle passed away at the Suzhou Shangfangshan Forest Zoo in China, where she has lived since 2008. She was put under anesthesia during a fifth attempt to artificially inseminate her, a procedure that people hoped would help save her species from extinction. This time, she never woke up.

Quote:With just three male Yangtze giant softshell turtles left, the death of the last female makes the species functionally extinct.


One male, estimated to be more than 100 years old, is left in the Chinese zoo | while two other turtles live in the wild in Vietnam. The elusive nature of the turtle means it has been difficult to identify the gender of the pair.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Several attempts at artificial insemination had taken place in the hope of continuing the species, but they all failed

Local staff and international experts had attempted to artificially inseminate the female 24 hours before she died on Saturday afternoon.

They said there were no complications from the operation and she had been in fine health after the procedure, but deteriorated the next day.

The cause of her death is being investigated and the turtle's ovarian tissue was collected for future research.

"It is tragic that the only known female of this species has died," the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) wrote in a statement, "but the real tragedy here is that this species has been decimated to near extinction by hunting and habitat destruction."

The female was first brought to the zoo in hopes that she would successfully mate with a 100-year-old male Yangtze giant softshell in residence there. But the couple never managed to reproduce naturally. That's when conservationists decided to try artificial insemination. The female underwent several attempted insemination procedures that failed to produce viable eggs before she died during the fifth.

“Sadly, this time the female turtle did not recover normally as she had in the past and she died despite 24 hours of nonstop emergency care," WCS wrote.

But there's a faint glimmer of hope: The species is famously elusive in the wild, so it's possible there's still a female hiding somewhere in the forests of China and Vietnam — it's just a matter of keeping her habitat safe and finding her.

"Scientists hope that this species can still be saved by working in conjunction with partners in China and with the Vietnamese government where two individuals of this turtle species, whose sex has not been determined, are known to be in the wild," WCS wrote.

You can help prevent turtles from going extinct by making a donation to the Turtle Survival Alliance.



But there's a faint glimmer of hope: The species is famously elusive in the wild, so it's possible there's still a female hiding somewhere in the forests of China and Vietnam — it's just a matter of keeping her habitat safe and finding her.

"Scientists hope that this species can still be saved by working in conjunction with partners in China and with the Vietnamese government where two individuals of this turtle species, whose sex has not been determined, are known to be in the wild," WCS wrote.

Indeed, just because these are the only ones known to us doesn't have to mean that they are the only ones. Recently, a Hawaiian plant that was thought to be extinct was rediscovered: https://qz.com/1600255/botanists-are-usi...t-flowers/, https://www.staradvertiser.com/2019/04/1...t-extinct/
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India Sanju Offline
Indian
*****

@BorneanTiger These type of rediscoveries happen time to time which are thought to be extinct. We are living in a vast world. Let's hope there are more turtles in the wild but let's not forget that they also can be the victims of humans any moment or second. Humans (Poachers & hunters) will always look to track-down them if they have to.
When Need turns to Greed, our Extinction happens.
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