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Tigers of Ranthambore & Western India Landscape

Rage2277 Offline
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anywhere with wild lions and tigers will a super hot spots..people will be running each other over to get sightings of possible interaction
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India Rishi Offline
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( This post was last modified: 03-08-2019, 09:49 PM by Rishi )

Another drifter to watch..

*This image is copyright of its original author
Shahzad-ud-din FD is tracking 2-2.5 years aged young tigress ST-13 who has left Sariska & is moving through fringe forests of Baswa Tehsil of Dausa District.

*This image is copyright of its original author

https://www.bhaskar.com/news/RAJ-OTH-MAT...9-NOR.html
"Everything not saved will be lost."

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India Sanju Offline
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( This post was last modified: 03-10-2019, 10:40 AM by Sanju )

Happy to see there is adequate tiger sub population in Kuno to become meta population and as functional corridor to Madhav NP and there after other reserves and parks to mitigate inbreeding risk naturally instead of spending money on man made solutions of translocation by transferring individuals in regular time intervals to maintain gene pool health.
At the same time going to harbor lions to save them from extinction. Such a great and wonderful place is kuno improving lions, tigers and other wildlife and forests future.
When Need turns to Greed, our Extinction happens.
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India Sanju Offline
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( This post was last modified: 03-10-2019, 11:02 AM by Sanju )



The great noor !
@sachin_rai_photography
・・・
The great descent ! Head first descent like a leopard !

A famous tigress fondly known as Noor, climbs down a flame of the forest tree in Ranthambhore, India.
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India Rishi Offline
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( This post was last modified: 03-10-2019, 08:33 PM by Rishi )

(03-08-2019, 08:37 PM)Sanju.... Wrote: happy to see there is adequate tiger sub population in kuno to become meta population and as functional corridor to madhav np and there after other reserves and parks to mitigate inbreeding risk naturally instead of spending money on man made solutions of translocation by transferring individuals in regular time intervals to maintain genepool health.

Not really, it's quite the opposite true rather.

While Ranthambore's tiger numbers have been surging, the females have barely move out. The known tigers that moved towards Kuno-Palpur post 2010 were all males... Every single one of them!

Other than T-38, there's another known male there called T-71 (clicked in 2015).

*This image is copyright of its original author

Kailadevi's resident male Sultanhimself to & froed between Kuno-Kailadevi during 2012-15, before he finally found T-92 & settled.

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author

The male cub of T-26 called Tufaan, went to Kuno & returned by December 2016, now back in Kailadevi.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Another of her cubs, young male T-77 may also be there.

The male cub of T-30 (reached Kuno in Feb, 2018).

*This image is copyright of its original author


Due to complete absence of females in all of northern Madhya Pradesh, both national parks Kuno & Madhav are completely devoid of a stable tiger population.
Either visiting transient males don't settle there at all.. or after failing to find a mate even after searching the whole region for years, they just give up like T-38 & waste away rest of their lives.
"Everything not saved will be lost."

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India Sanju Offline
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( This post was last modified: 03-10-2019, 02:09 PM by Sanju )

(03-10-2019, 12:15 PM)Rishi Wrote: While Ranthambore's tiger numbers have been surging, the females have barely move out. The known tigers that moved towards Kuno-Palpur post 2010 were all males... Every single one of them!
You already answered that question few days back. Like But, there are reports of cubs in Kuno region (link provided in previous post). The gene pool exchange don't need females obligatorily. Males can migrate to Madhav to Panna; then to others and vice versa (but each migration may take years). In that way, genetic flux can improve genetic diversity, viability or variations by males naturally.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Other than that, MP tried to relocate some tigers to Kuno to start a meta population (late 2017 I  think) but feared that *h1t Gujarat govt will stop Lion Project by showing this reason even though SC rejected that. Hence, they stopped that and started concentrating only on Lions.
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India Rishi Offline
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( This post was last modified: 03-11-2019, 11:35 PM by Rishi )

Tiger Sultan (T-72) in Kailadevi with a feral cow kill.
Tiger Watch

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In Jan 2017, he found a Tigress called Sundari (T-92) in the sanctuary. They created history by breeding & producing 2 cubs, to be born there in at least 30 years (Sh. Gajsingh Ji Alsisar had seen Tiger cubs there in January 1980). 
Village Wildlife Volunteers witnessed this scene from a cliffside overlooking a deep gorge. The VWV reported that Sultan had dragged a cattle kill for over a kilometer into the gorge for the mother & cubs the previous day.
Dharmendra Khandal

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"Everything not saved will be lost."

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India Sanju Offline
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Tiger fitted with radio collar released in Mukundra Hills

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MHTR was finally tranquillised and collared by the forest department


A young sub-adult T-98 tiger that strayed from the Ranthambore Tiger Reserve (RTR) to Mukundra Hills Tiger Reserve (MHTR) was finally tranquillised and collared by the forest department on Saturday.

The tiger was released in Mashanpura forest range where the big cat made its new home for past several days. A forest official at MHTR said, “The tiger was tranquillised around 6.12 am in the morning. After installing the radio collar, the tiger was released in Mashanpura region. We have deployed teams to monitor the tiger round the clock,” he said.

The forest department was making several attempts to tranquillise and release it in Darah range of MHTR after the decision was taken by the committee on February 21. “Due to dense forest and gorges, the tiger was not sighted for past so many days. The movement of the tiger was recorded after installing camera traps and witnessing its pug marks.

Today, we successfully managed to tranquillise the animal,” said an officer. Earlier, the decision to collar the tiger was taken by the committee constituted to deal with emergency situation due to straying of big cat T-98 near human settlement. After the Wildlife Institute of India (WII) experts visited the area where the tiger strayed, they suggested to collar the tiger immediately.

The forest administration officials were earlier willing to release the tiger in Seljar range of MHTR after tranquillising. However, the proposal was turned down by the experts. “We have decided to release the tiger outside the 82 sq km enclosure, where two big cats were recently relocated. Our tracking team will be on job and tiger monitoring will be done extensively,” he said.

In past, the tiger movement is constantly recorded near the Ghati village. The tiger was repeatedly straying into human settlements or is responsible for attacks on humans or livestock, then the forest authorities have been advised to trap the animal as per standard procedures.
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United Kingdom GreenForest Offline
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Decimation of Sariska(2004), Panna(2008) gene pool is big setback for Ranthambore tigers since both are closest reserve to Ranthambore. Ranthambore tiger population itself was close to extinction  in 1990s, they bounced back from few handful of tigers. So, high diversity can't be expected. It is hard to see large size tigers from the tiger population originated from smaller founder population. Effects of inbreeding will slowly catch up(amur tigers, gir lions all same story). That is sad fact of Ranthambore tigers. Other central indian reserves are inter-connected to some extent, tigers exchange gene pool producing healthy tigers of different sizes, shapes. But, Ranthambore is like an island. Unless humans intervene, no one can help them unfortunately.
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Germany Lycaon Online
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Surendra Chouhan

Fateh


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India Sanju Offline
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( This post was last modified: 04-03-2019, 09:41 AM by Sanju )

Male tiger to be relocated from Ranthambore to Sariska

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After a gap of six years, the Rajasthan forest department is preparing to shift a big cat from Ranthambore Tiger Reserve (RTR) to Sariska Tiger Reserve (STR) soon.

This time a male tiger will be relocated. Skewed sex ratio has been hampering the repopulation of big cats in Sariska. The National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA) had approved the relocation of a tiger in June 2017, with an aim to increase the population.

However, the process was delayed as tiger relocation to Mukundra Hills Tiger Reserve (MHTR) was the priority of the former BJP government.

Meet of forest admn, experts today

According to sources, the field inspection team of NTCA and the Wildlife Institute of India (WII) had come to RNP to complete prerequisite process. A meeting has also been slated between the forest administration and experts on Tuesday to identify the tiger.

Quote:“We have shortlisted five tigers for relocation. A tiger aged between 4 to 6 years will be most likely to be relocated,” a senior forest official said.


Currently, the park has three male and eight female tigers. There is an urgent need to relocate a male tiger to maintain the sex ratio.

Recently, male tiger ST-4 died in a territorial fight with ST-6.

This was the third death after the reserve was repopulated in 2008. ST-1, the first tiger brought from Ranthambore, also a male, died in 2010 after villagers poisoned it.

On March 19, 2018, four year-old male tiger ST-11 died after it got entangled in a barbed wire fence laid by a villager close to a forest post adjoining Sariska.

Quote:The news of relocation of a male tiger has been welcomed by wildlife lovers who have been making this demand for long.


Quote:Dinesh Verma Durani, founder and general secretary of the Sariska Tiger Foundation and a member of the advisory committee of Sariska, said, “The state government is finally paying heed to our demands. Shifting a male tiger is necessary for Sariska’s survival.”

In another decision, the department will also deploy 70 home guards for monitoring tigers and patrol.

On December 31, 40 home guards, engaged in security duty at the park, left after they were not paid wages for nine months.

*This image is copyright of its original author

(Sariska is a tiger reserve located in Alwar in Rajasthan. Once known for its palaces and tigers, poaching had become so rampant in the early 2000s that conservationists feared that all the tigers may have been killed. In 2005, journalist Jay Mazoomdar broke the news that all of Sariska's tigers had been wiped out. Several relocation measures have been undertaken recently and the population is growing slowly.

May be this is how India's tigers discipline their young, after all that has happened and has happened in Sariska.


This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 2.5 India License. Posted by Rohan Chakravarty at 22:01
https://www.greenhumour.com/search?q=sariska)
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Rage2277 Offline
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*This image is copyright of its original author
 akash t64 photo by Ravindra Jain
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India Sanju Offline
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( This post was last modified: 04-09-2019, 09:36 PM by Sanju )

Corridor Linking between Ranthambore and Sariska... Rathambore is like Gir forest which is facing severe inbreeding problem and risk of extinction.






An ambitious project planned by the forest department in Rajasthan – a corridor linking all the six major wildlife sanctuaries in the state.

The idea is to open up the tiger corridors between these forests so tigers can roam freely without human interference. How will they make it work? Will they be successful? Find out on WildernessDays with TomAlter, Friday at 10:30 pm.
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United States Roflcopters Offline
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Sariska is a poaching central, I really hope this doesn’t go through. the idea is great but given Sariska’s history in the past. this is just a death wish for the tigers. I wish someone raised alarms sooner for Umred Karhandla and Satkosia. just my two cents.
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India Sanju Offline
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The unsung Saga of T13 of Ranthambore Tiger Reserve

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You call her Sultanpur female or Chhoti, the mother of T39 aka Noor did not get the limelight her aunt T16 aka Machali got.

Chhoti was the only litter of T14 who was amongst the 3 sisters T15 & T16 aka Machhali. The shy niece of matriarch Machhali, T13 has few of the characteristics of her extrovert aunt.

I always feel that Sultanpur chowki & Guda tiger families have always encountered tragic circumstances leaving them to face a hard life.
T12 father of T39 & protector of T13 was unfortunately relocated to Sariska in 2010. As a result T-12 (Noor's father) territory was left estranged which was further over took by dominant Sultanpur Male (T-24) aka Ustad. Ustad is amongst the most popular & equally controversial male tiger of Ranthambore who is relocated to Sajjangarh as a suspected man eater & now confined to an area of less than an hectare in the park.

T13 left the core area & her territory towards Sawai Mansingh Sanctury on the periphery of Ranthambore National Park. At the same time T38 brother of Noor who vanished without a trace but sometime later it was being caught around the area of Kuno Palpur Sanctuary in MP. Her brother was being identified through the similarity in the striped patterns and was further confirmed that it was the same lost brother of Noor. Impressively, T-38 covered the dangerous journey over 100 miles by crossing the grand Chambal River. The settling of her brother actually created enthusiasm among the conservationists and the forest officials about the functioning of the Kuno Palpur Sanctuary.

T13 has been regularly seen trying to court with T42 aka Fateh who already has seen mating with T59. In my last encounter I found T13 & T42 at a distance of not more than 30m from each other with T13 showing signs of gestation.

Its going to be great to see the dynamics of zone 10 during the Summers of 18 with T13,T42 & the younger one...
When Need turns to Greed, our Extinction happens.
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