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Tigers of Ranthambore & Western India Landscape

Guatemala GuateGojira Offline
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(12-19-2018, 02:32 PM)Rishi Wrote: No! Gwalior is just on the other side of Ranthambore in MP. The city is north of Kuno-Palpur & princely state was the northern half of today's Madhya Pradesh. It's southeast of Ranthambore's actually...

If that is the case, there is no problem. However I am quoting from memory, so I am not 100% sure if the place was Gwalior. By the way many huge tigers came from that part, some of them as heavy or heavier than the large 570 lb male from Hewett.

Now, about the "slim" or "lite" form of the Ranthambore tigers, I have saw some bulky tigers there too, but I do think that this population have one of the more atletic forms of all the Indian tigers. Based in three books of the great Valmik Thapar (1-Tiger protrait of a predator, 2-Tiger the secret life, 3-Tiger the ultimate guide), some Ranthambore tigers are the only ones that actually hunt its prey runing at maximum speeds of up to sixty miles an hour! They are the only ones that adopted the method to hunt prey in the water and they learned to live in familiar, although scattered, groups.

Ranthambore tigers are special in many ways. Or maybe is just that living in an "open" habitat, they are easier to see and learn they "hidden" behaviours, just like Dr Sunquist told me.
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India Rishi Offline
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( This post was last modified: 12-22-2018, 10:47 AM by Rishi )

After a series of disheartening events, some good news from Sariska Tiger Reserve.

3 cubs were born to tigress ST-10. Finally their rate of reproduction there is picking pace.
A STR team was trekking in the areas near Tal Vraksh range when they heard muffled voices of cubs playing alongside a culvert. The forest officials carefully sneaked in and found the cubs, about 15-days old.


DFO Hemant Gupta said that a few days ago ST-10’s location was found to be static, which had raised the hopes of good news.
“She was under our watch ever since we found that she was pregnant. A special tracking team was following her pugmarks too,” the the official said.

There's been no new translocation to Sariska in years. A male is expected to be moved there by spring 2019.
That'll take the tiger numbers in Sariska to 20.
"Everything not saved will be lost."

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India Rishi Offline
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(12-22-2018, 09:44 PM)olivergreen Wrote: Does corbett has more tigers or Ranthambore national park in Sawai Madhopur?

Corbett! It's 1500 has almost 200 resident & transient riders as per last census, with 2000+km² of pristine habitat adjoining it.

Ranthambore on the other hand is 500km² odd CTR (Critical tiger habitat) & almost 1000km² buffer, mostly scrub & thorn forest, that has total 70 tigers, 24 males & 25 female adults, only about dozen of whom live outside the CTR.

There's no comparison...
"Everything not saved will be lost."

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India Rishi Offline
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( This post was last modified: 12-27-2018, 02:20 PM by Rishi )

Proposed Delhi-Mumbai Expressway threaten Ranthambore-Mukundara corridor


*This image is copyright of its original author

Union minister Nitin Gadkari’s ambitious 1,250km Delhi-Mumbai Expressway project is likely to disturb the tiger habitat in Rajasthan. Implementation of the project in the state would cut through the tiger corridor between Ranthambore (between Ramgarh Vishdhari Sanctuary in Sawai Madhpour district Jawahar Sagar Sanctuary in Bundi district) and Mukundara-Hills Tiger Reserve.

National Highway Authority of India (NHAI) is mulling over constructing the Expressway on 36 hectares of forest land in the Mukundra Hills Tiger Reserve (MHTR). Though a formal proposal is yet to be submitted to the state FD, as per initial discussions, in NHAI's suggested alignment it passes through Jhamra region in the 200sq.km Darrah range at MHTR where most of the wildlife population is found.

*This image is copyright of its original author
The six-lane highway, intended to trim the road-distance to Mumbai by 10 hours, will be signal free & commuters can run vehicles at a speed of 120 km per hour!

Forest department source said, “During a recent meeting, NHAI proposed to construct a viaduct inside MHTR. After the proposal was turned down by the forest department, the authority proposed to construct a tunnel inside the forest area. However, any construction inside the forest would impact wildlife. The forest department has urged the agency to opt for an alternative alignment.”

With tigers facing space crunch in Ranthambore, need for keeping corridors undisturbed to facilitate free movement towards MHTR is crucial.
"Everything not saved will be lost."

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United States Pckts Offline
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(12-20-2018, 07:27 AM)Rishi Wrote: IMO of all (known) central Indian tigers, Mamu of Bandhavgarh looks most similar to the western ones.
You could mistake him for one...




©Ravi Bandhavgarh

He's actually the Son of Jobhi

Ravi Bandhavgarh‎ 

Jobhi Male

Evening Safari Magdhi Zone

*This image is copyright of its original author

Venkatesh Srinivasan
Jobhi male. 



It was the last safari of the tour. This huge male is new to this part of the park. He is usually spotted kilometers away from this place on the other side of the park. This is the same place where the mother and the cubs were seen for the last 2 days. So, the forest department got into action, as they were worried he would hurt the cubs if he is not the father.


This was not the usual sighting, which happens when a tiger accidentaly comes in your way and you happen to be at the right place at the right time. Due to the action of the forest department, 3 elephants were put to work to keep an eye on this huge male. The tiger was understandably disturbed due to the elephants and decided to walk into the open, which worked very well to our advantage. This is probably the most easily identifiable tiger. Unusual as it may seem, when carefully observed, you can see that the entire right shoulder has no stripes!

Place – Bandhavgarh NP, May 2014
Camera – Canon EOS 7D
Lens – Canon 100-400


*This image is copyright of its original author
"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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India Sanju Offline
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( This post was last modified: 01-20-2019, 01:06 PM by Rishi )

How the return of the tiger can help save the Aravalis
Shilpy Arora | TNN | Jan 14, 2019, 08:06 IST

ST-5 went missing from Sariska Tiger Reserve in February 2018

*This image is copyright of its original author


GURUGRAM: ST-5, the 11-year-old resident of Rajasthan’s Sariska Tiger Reserve, was always curious to explore new terrain. Aged three when brought here from Ranthambore, this shy and elusive tigress took part in big hunts but remained out of sight most of the time.

“Unlike other tigresses, who generally establish small territories, she wanted to claim new territories. Probably, that’s why she might have headed towards the Aravalis of South Haryana, which was once home of the majestic animal,” speculated a villager from Sariska, while a team from the reserve searched for ST-5 in the jungles of the Aravalis in this part of Haryana, though no sign of the big cat was found.

Meanwhile, male tigers, say experts, are solitary animals who eye large expanses. “Tigers will occupy a habitat if it helps them stay safe, and provides prey density, availability of water and an undisturbed area to roam in. They would simply follow their instinct to hide, hunt and claim a large area as home range, and would prefer an area where there are no other tigers to compete with for prey or home range,” explains Kartick Satyanarayan, co-founder and CEO, Wildlife SOS.

The last time the Aravalis of South Haryana was in the news for a tiger was nearly five decades ago, when one was killed by a poacher. But even though sightings reported by locals, on the last day of 2018, remained unverified, they still offered encouragement to the many who hope that this eco-fragile wilderness, where tigers once wandered, can be saved.

According to R P Balwan, former conservator of forests (South Haryana), there is recorded evidence of tigers in the Aravalis. “The leopard made its comeback in the Aravalis of South Haryana only after 2004-05, about four years after the implementation of a strict ban on mining activities. At that time, when we said the leopard had arrived, not everyone believed us,” he recalled. “I won’t be surprised if tigers make a comeback to reclaim their ancestral land in the Aravalis — it is still a potential tiger habitat.”

Activists rejoice at such a prospect, as they feel the presence of tigers can help save the under-threat range. “The Aravalis is a well-defined wildlife corridor from Sariska Tiger Reserve to Asola Bhatti Sanctuary (Delhi) — for wild animals, this corridor has been home for several centuries. The arrival of tigers calls for the protection of the entire area, and it should be declared a sanctuary,” advises Vivek Kamboj, an environmentalist who has been fighting a legal battle to safeguard the corridor.

And that these lands were once the haunt of tigers should be a matter of pride for its human inhabitants, says wildlife conservationist and author Prerna Singh Bindra. “Tigers in Sariska have been able to survive because of habitat protection, while they are largely wiped out from other parts of the Aravalis, as we have devastated and pillaged the habitat,” she points out. “Now, their survival in the Aravalis will depend not just on if there is sufficient prey and undisturbed habitat, but also if the government is willing to accept the responsibility this brings, and make it a safe refuge for the tiger.”

declare haryana aravalli reserve forestsdeepak pratap gangwar

While it is difficult to ascertain if ST-5 survived to reclaim her ancestral patch, the Aravalis certainly belong to her. For, by roaming freely on the outskirts of Gurugram (then a sleepy rural town) some 50 years ago, tigers helped preserve the region’s ecology. Sadly, urbanisation, poaching and mining led to their entire population vanishing.

The time is right for this regal species to return to these wilds, to assist in the revival of the degraded forests and intensify the fight to protect the Aravalis. “The wilderness will flourish as soon as the king is back, as existence of the apex predator ensures the well-being of the ecosystem,” assures Balwan.

https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com//art...=TOIMobile
When Need turns to Greed, our Extinction happens.
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India Rishi Offline
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( This post was last modified: 01-20-2019, 09:57 PM by Rishi )

MT-1 & MT-2 together in Mukundara Hills

There is special news from Mukundara Tiger Reserve. After waiting for 1 long month MT-1 is getting to know his mate. Distance between the two's location have been decreasing since last week, now both of them are being sighted together for two days as per forest department.

Department officials are also assuming that it is a good sign of the future. According to the success, another tigresses is expected to be shifted to Mukundara by mid-February .

Due to peculiar shadow of the reserve, the tigers were being exposed in a 82sq.km fenced area to prevent them from straying after release. That is soon to be removed & they will be free to train the 200sq.km Darah Zone that can host more than 15 tigers.

Full details:
https://m.patrika.com/kota-news/mukunda-...p-3998719/

Another Ranthambore tiger in Bundi district
(All names are G-map links as usual)

A young male tiger crossed the Chambal river, via Keshavraipatan area of Bundi have reached Mandavari area of Sultanpur range.
Before this he was last seen in a rugged area near a farm, where he hunted a Nilgai, at Laxmipura village of Notada (Dharwan) Panchayat.
.

The forest workers of Bundi district, tracking him Saturday morning, informed the officials in Kota district about fresh pugmarks of the tiger.
Now for the purpose of monitoring the tiger, the duty of the forest workers has been imposed for 24/7. Camera-traps are also going to be laid once his position is located, for identification. But he hasn't stopped moving yet, his age is being described as 7-8 years & guessed to be T-62 or T-110.

In the river ravines & scrubland of Sultanpur range, a tigress T-35 had already come from Ranthambore & lived for nearly five years as the corridor ends there. She is believed to have later been poached.

This tiger too might get stranded there, if he's taken that wrong route. Otherwise, with luck, he might reach Mukundara!

Sources:
https://m.patrika.com/kota-news/tiger-62...s-4003562/
https://m.patrika.com/kota-news/tiger-co...e-3993731/
https://m.patrika.com/sawai-madhopur-new...a-4002825/

Edit:
As per latest update today morning the tiger's photo was captured & he turned out to be T-110, age is about 2.5 to 3 years old..

*This image is copyright of its original author

9 years after the T-35, tiger T-110 has entered the Sultanpur area through the Bundi area through the gullies along the banks of Chambal river that separates the Bundi & Kota districts.

*This image is copyright of its original author

The river goes through Mukundara hills, but before that about 50kms from Ranthambore, the eroded barren thickets give way to farmland & ultimately the city of Kota.

*This image is copyright of its original author

He has got absolutely no chance of reaching Mukundara naturally, just like T-35 before him.

Source:
https://www.bhaskar.com/rajasthan/kota/n...10301.html
"Everything not saved will be lost."

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India Rishi Offline
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( This post was last modified: 01-26-2019, 12:31 PM by Rishi )

"Maybe T-110" to be shifted to Mukundara Hills Tiger Reserve
Thursday | Jan 24, 2019 

The tiger captured in camera near Khedli Tawran village of Sultanpur forest range

*This image is copyright of its original author

JAIPUR: After tranquillising and fitting GPS-enabled collar, tiger believed to be T-110 which strayed from Ranthambore National Park (RNP) to Sultanpur range in Kota will be released in Seljar range of Mukundara Hills Tiger Reserve (MHTR) where T-91 was originally supposed to be released. Yesterday, the state forest department of Rajasthan made the decision of capturig & shifting the tiger as it was lurking in the fields & charged at villagers. Reportedly, he even killed a cow as well.

“We already have one hectare enclosure at Seljar for the soft release. The forest department informed police and district administration about the operation. The department had earlier obtained the NTCA permission to shift the tiger in the northern part of the tiger reserve (Seljar area, Borawas Range) where prey base augmentation was carried out by translocating spotted deer and sambar.”


Earlier, in 2017 relocation plan was altered from the Seljar to Darrah zone by standing committee members on wildlife owing to security concern of the animal, which sparked a months-long confusion with the NTCA.
It remains a challenge to the forest department to provide safe environment for tigers in MHTR as a majority of villagers living inside the protected forest are refusing to rehabilitation. Villages near the Seljar range including Borawas graze more than 50 thousand cattle inside the forest.

Of the 14 villages inside MHTR, which was notified as the the third tiger reserve in Rajasthan in 2013 only two, Lakshmipura and Kharli Baori, have been rehabilitated so far. “Residents of 12 other villages are not satisfied with the compensation,” said a forest official.

Sources:
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/artic...663966.cms
https://www.nyoooz.com/news/jaipur/13098...dra-hills/
https://www.patrika.com/kota-news/tiger-...t-4026122/
"Everything not saved will be lost."

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Germany Lycaon Offline
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India should really consider creating natural corridors, for wildlife to pass uninterrupted and without stress of being captured and tranquilized.
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United States Pckts Offline
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( This post was last modified: 01-24-2019, 05:54 PM by Pckts )

There are many @Lycaon 
In fact, almost every reserve has corridors that lead somewhere else, the protection of said corridors certainly isn't as good as within the Reserves, for the most part.
"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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Germany Lycaon Offline
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Tigress arrowhead 

Varun Jain


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United States Pckts Offline
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Pramathesh Saha
T57
Location : Ranthambore Tiger Reserve, Rajasthan, India 

Nearest Town : Sawai Madhopur 

Captured : May 2018
King is going for rest on a deep valley ... Zone 2

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"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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United States Pckts Offline
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RIP Pacman
Sandesh Guru
A tiger once seen as a cub grows to become an adult. He leaves his territory and moves on to face new challenges. The challenges that are never ending and competitions that are difficult to win. Its the fate of every tiger that decides the life of a tiger. The fate that is brutal yet makes a tiger, a healthy competitor in the Indian jungles. If the tiger fails in competing, then he might have to leave his territory or die.

A tiger whom most of us have seen and photographed, often known to be the dearest of the mother Krishna, had a long way to go and survived for a couple of years. Wandering and foraging, he had made a place for himself deep in the woods, until he had to face a much stronger tiger.

Today, his carcass was found by the forest department and the cause of the death was known to be a territorial fight - a natural cause! (Sources).

He was called ‘Pacman’! A tiger whom I always loved to sight while I was at Ranthambhore. His notorious behaviour with siblings, timidness when he shared the kill with his sister, crazily charging at crocodiles and innocence when he had caught the spotted deer fawn and played with it has left me spellbound.

What lasts today, is only his memories! Not being emotional, but an expression of how much I have enjoyed watching him!

R.I.P Pacman (T-85).
A post dedicated to him!!


*This image is copyright of its original author



The Ranthambhore Bagh
An old night picture of a male tiger (we use to call him "Chips') around the lake in Ranthambhore. This was an interesting story: In the winters of 2000-2001 there was a tigress who had four 8-9-month-old cubs. Her range was around Chiroli. One day one of her cubs was found dead near the forest track. The body had no visible injuries. Forest staff started looking for the mother and the other three cubs and did not find any evidence of them. The Field Director got together a team of volunteers, including Aditya Singh - our resident photographer, gave them vehicles and asked them to find the family. After spending almost a few full days and nights, Aditya Singh's team did find the family on the second day and even got some really bad pictures around midnight. The tigress had shifted her territory to another area near Bhid and that's why she could not be found. A few weeks later she once again shifted her territory to a place known as Sakri and hen stayed there till she died, which is another very interesting and sad story.

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"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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Rage2277 Offline
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burn on mighty flame
"ssshhh...listen to the rain"...
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Germany Lycaon Offline
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Fatheh


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