There is a world somewhere between reality and fiction. Although ignored by many, it is very real and so are those living in it. This forum is about the natural world. Here, wild animals will be heard and respected. The forum offers a glimpse into an unknown world as well as a room with a view on the present and the future. Anyone able to speak on behalf of those living in the emerald forest and the deep blue sea is invited to join.
--- Peter Broekhuijsen ---

  • 2 Vote(s) - 3.5 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
The Caspian Tiger (Panthera tigris virgata)

Canada Wolverine Offline
Moderator
*****
Moderators
#16
( This post was last modified: 12-25-2018, 07:54 AM by Wolverine )

As long as I know captive Caspian tigers were breeding during 60's and 70's in Moscow zoo, but the director of the zoo - shame on him - decided to stop breeding them and shifted to Amur tigers. If not that disastrous decision now we could still have pure captive Caspian in the world. In same time during 60's and 70's Amur tigers were also on the bring of extinction with only 100-200 of them left in the wild so maybe we should not judge the director too harsh.
5 users Like Wolverine's post
Reply

Nepal Jimmy Offline
Regular Member
***
#17
( This post was last modified: 12-25-2018, 06:53 AM by Jimmy )

@Wolverine if so then there would probably have been tough competition between dholes and wolves, how might have they coexisted, I think it would have been like coyotes and wolves but dholes probably lived with larger packs and possed a real thteat, maybe it was like those between Spotted hyena and African wild dogs!!!
3 users Like Jimmy's post
Reply

Canada Wolverine Offline
Moderator
*****
Moderators
#18
( This post was last modified: 12-25-2018, 08:41 AM by Wolverine )

Unlike coyotes dholes are big game hunters and make larger packs. I would compare coyotes with jackals, not with dholes. 
In same time there is a big difference between smallish tropical wolves who could coexist with dholes (and tigers) and large and powerfull Nordic wolves which pursue dholes and are in same time aggressively pursued by Amur tigers as competitors.
2 users Like Wolverine's post
Reply

Nepal Jimmy Offline
Regular Member
***
#19
( This post was last modified: 12-25-2018, 01:49 PM by Jimmy )

Yeah that's the thing, i took coyote only interms of size probably their relationship was closer to that between spotted hyena and wild dogs in terms of pack size and body mass ratios, but wolves are more co-ordinated, agile and fast themselves but they don't have as devastating bite as a spotted hyena and both being top canines targeting the same prey make things a lot interesting, they would try to jump up the hierarchy and could challenge each other time to time. It would look epic, a large Ussuri dhole pack against slightly small pack of Ussuri wolves trying to establish dominance over a kill are sidelined while a large bear or a tiger claims the kill.
1 user Likes Jimmy's post
Reply

United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
Senior Member
****
#20
( This post was last modified: 12-26-2018, 12:19 PM by BorneanTiger )

(12-25-2018, 03:43 AM)Wolverine Wrote: As long as I know captive Caspian tigers were breeding during 60's and 70's in Moscow zoo, but the director of the zoo - shame on him - decided to stop breeding them and shifted to Amur tigers. If not that disastrous decision now we could still have pure captive Caspian in the world. In same time during 60's and 70's Amur tigers were also on the bring of extinction with only 100-200 of them left in the wild so maybe we should not judge the director too harsh.

Do you have a reference for this? I have references for Caspian tigers from Iran and the Caucasus being bred in Germany: 

Caucasian tiger in Berlin Zoo, 1899: https://web.archive.org/web/200708240914...ger-13.htm

*This image is copyright of its original author


Soraya the Persian tigress in Hagenbeck Zoo, 19551969: http://www.catsg.org/fileadmin/fileshari...n_Iran.pdf

*This image is copyright of its original author


But not in any Russian zoo. Interestingly however, there's another Russian zoo that came in the news for housing a big cat that's supposed to be lost in the wild: Novorsibirsk Zoo , which apparently had Cape lions, or descendants of a lion that was left behind a circus many years prior, before transferring them to a zoo in their natural home country of South Africa (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/world/monitor...007452.stm, http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/SOUTH-...52f6d011cc), so I wonder how many zoos or circuses in Russia or elsewhere had Caspian tigers?
3 users Like BorneanTiger's post
Reply

Canada Wolverine Offline
Moderator
*****
Moderators
#21
( This post was last modified: 12-26-2018, 08:41 AM by Wolverine )

(12-25-2018, 01:21 PM)BorneanTiger Wrote: Do you have a reference for this? I have references for Caspian tigers from Iran and the Caucasus being bred in Germany: 

Yes, but I have to correct myself, it was in 1920's-1930's. In Moscow zoo lived a Caspian tigress "Tereza" , she was presented to Soviet ambassador in Iran in 1926 from Iranian authorities. Tereza lived 18 years. In the work "Caspian tiger - analysis of the current situation" by O. Tcaruk & U.Tcukin, p.17 is written shortly:

https://wwf.ru/upload/iblock/058/obzorny...zbruss.pdf

"Содержание в неволе В Московском зоопарке до конца 30-х годов жила ручная тигрица Тереза, подаренная нашему послу в Иране в 1926 году. Последний туранский тигр жил в Гамбурге до 1959 году. В 1978 году во время исламской революции в Тегеране в шахском зверинце были расстреляны последние животные этого подвида. "

Obviously at that time the director of Moscow was on crossroads - to breed Caspian tigers or to breed Amur tigers. Both subspecies at those times were on the edge, and he decided to continue with Amurs.


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author



Here Bornean Tiger is a 50 pages long "Program of Reintoduction of the tiger in Kazahstan", unfourtunately for you everything is in Russian:

https://wwf.ru/upload/iblock/c7e/tigerpr...5_russ.pdf
7 users Like Wolverine's post
Reply

Canada Wolverine Offline
Moderator
*****
Moderators
#22
( This post was last modified: 12-28-2018, 08:39 PM by Wolverine )


*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author
4 users Like Wolverine's post
Reply

United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
Senior Member
****
#23

(12-27-2018, 06:48 AM)Wolverine Wrote:
*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author

Where are these photos from?
Reply

Canada Wolverine Offline
Moderator
*****
Moderators
#24
( This post was last modified: 12-28-2018, 08:59 PM by Wolverine )

This tiger trophy is from the personal collection of Pyotr Semyonov-Tyan-Shansky (1827-1914) - a Russian explorer of Central Asia, he is most famous with his expeditions in the aria of Tyan-Shan mountains, so probably the tiger was shot in the aria of Tyan-Shan, now its in the house museum of Pyotr Semyonovich in St Petersburg:
https://www.rgo.ru/ru/article/po-sledam-...edovatelya



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyotr_Semy...an-Shansky


*This image is copyright of its original author



Concerning the photo from the bottom (post #22) I'm not sure is it from Caspian or Bengal tiger so decided to delete it.

Painting of Caspian tiger:


*This image is copyright of its original author
6 users Like Wolverine's post
Reply

United States Lycaon Online
أسد الأطلس
*****
Moderators
#25

Here is a rare photo of a living caspian tiger 

credits go to mohammad Farhadinia
*This image is copyright of its original author
11 users Like Lycaon's post
Reply

United States Lycaon Online
أسد الأطلس
*****
Moderators
#26

Here is another live caspian


*This image is copyright of its original author


credits to Mohammad Fardhianina
4 users Like Lycaon's post
Reply

United States Lycaon Online
أسد الأطلس
*****
Moderators
#27

Yet another photo of a live caspian tiger, probably in the moscow zoo


*This image is copyright of its original author
11 users Like Lycaon's post
Reply

Canada Wolverine Offline
Moderator
*****
Moderators
#28

(12-25-2018, 11:38 AM)Jimmy Wrote:  It would look epic, a large Ussuri dhole pack against slightly small pack of Ussuri wolves trying to establish dominance over a kill are sidelined while a large bear or a tiger claims the kill.


*This image is copyright of its original author
3 users Like Wolverine's post
Reply

Nepal Jimmy Offline
Regular Member
***
#29

(01-14-2019, 12:23 PM)Wolverine Wrote:
(12-25-2018, 11:38 AM)Jimmy Wrote:  It would look epic, a large Ussuri dhole pack against slightly small pack of Ussuri wolves trying to establish dominance over a kill are sidelined while a large bear or a tiger claims the kill.


*This image is copyright of its original author
Where did you find this, large packs of both would look awesome, did it have a backstory or something, this look like might have been in children's book, would love to read what went on??
Reply

India Rishi Offline
Moderator
*****
Moderators
#30

A painting i found once... Caspian?

*This image is copyright of its original author
Everything not saved will be lost. - Nintendo 

2 users Like Rishi's post
Reply






Users browsing this thread:
1 Guest(s)

About Us
Go Social     Subscribe  

Welcome to WILDFACT forum, a website that focuses on sharing the joy that wildlife has on offer. We welcome all wildlife lovers to join us in sharing that joy. As a member you can share your research, knowledge and experience on animals with the community.
wildfact.com is intended to serve as an online resource for wildlife lovers of all skill levels from beginners to professionals and from all fields that belong to wildlife anyhow. Our focus area is wild animals from all over world. Content generated here will help showcase the work of wildlife experts and lovers to the world. We believe by the help of your informative article and content we will succeed to educate the world, how these beautiful animals are important to survival of all man kind.
Many thanks for visiting wildfact.com. We hope you will keep visiting wildfact regularly and will refer other members who have passion for wildlife.

Forum software by © MyBB