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Skulls, Skeletons, Canines & Claws

Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
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(03-03-2020, 04:02 AM)anvo1414 Wrote: Hi can anybody help me
I dont know this tooth is tiger or lion ?

It looks more like tiger's.
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United States anvo1414 Offline
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(03-04-2020, 03:20 AM)GrizzlyClaws Wrote:
(03-03-2020, 04:02 AM)anvo1414 Wrote: Hi can anybody help me
I dont know this tooth is tiger or lion ?

It looks more like tiger's.

Thank you so much
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United States Sam44 Offline
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( This post was last modified: 03-30-2020, 07:51 AM by tigerluver )

I was wondering if this tooth is a legitimate lions tooth. Please help me identify it and how to identify lions teeth

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United States tigerluver Offline
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( This post was last modified: 03-30-2020, 07:55 AM by tigerluver )

The crown looks quite short and the posterior edge seems to have odd crest which gives some concern for authenticity. @GrizzlyClaws's input will be helpful. Are there any views of the cross-section of the tooth?
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United States Sam44 Offline
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(03-30-2020, 07:55 AM)tigerluver Wrote: The crown looks quite short and the posterior edge seems to have odd crest which gives some concern for authenticity. @GrizzlyClaws's input will be helpful. Are there any views of the cross-section of the tooth?

I can’t really see much of the tooth since the cap is on it. Seller says he got it from a vet friend from the Cincinnati zoo back in 1960s
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Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
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Maybe the tooth has been washed and bleached over time.

If this tooth is really authentic, then I would say most likely a lower canine of a lion.
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United States Sam44 Offline
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(03-31-2020, 02:55 AM)GrizzlyClaws Wrote: Maybe the tooth has been washed and bleached over time.

If this tooth is really authentic, then I would say most likely a lower canine of a lion.

Ahhh ok thank you so much for your help !!
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Brazil Dark Jaguar Offline
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( This post was last modified: 06-08-2020, 10:44 PM by Dark Jaguar )

Black/Açú Caiman skull of over 50 years old.

credits: Richard Rasmussen



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*This image is copyright of its original author




*This image is copyright of its original author



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*This image is copyright of its original author
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Brazil Dark Jaguar Offline
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( This post was last modified: 06-13-2020, 01:49 AM by Dark Jaguar )

Skull of the very last Pampas jaguar ( south Brazil ).

https://www.oeco.org.br/blogs/rastro-de-...-extincao/

When this individual was poached in 1952 Pampas jaguars was officially considered extinct.


''According to hunters, it was an adult male weighing 86 kg, killed by preying on a pig farm. On the occasion, three hunters shot him and later they went to get a photographer in the city to take pictures of the dead animal next to the shotguns used in the great battle. ''


photo: Fabio Mazim

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Taiwan Panthera Offline
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Hello, 
I was told this replica skull is a Bengal tiger, the head length is 355mm, canine length is 58mm.
Is this in the range of Bengal tiger?
I feel that the posterior contour of canine seem oddly, it has a dented, both canines are. Is it normal? 


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India sanjay Offline
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( This post was last modified: 06-21-2020, 09:41 PM by sanjay )

Tagging @GrizzlyClaws and @tigerluver in reference of above post
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United States Pckts Offline
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(06-21-2020, 07:05 PM)Panthera Wrote: Hello, 
I was told this replica skull is a Bengal tiger, the head length is 355mm, canine length is 58mm.
Is this in the range of Bengal tiger?
I feel that the posterior contour of canine seem oddly, it has a dented, both canines are. Is it normal? 


*This image is copyright of its original author




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*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author

Very odd indeed, maybe something off during the casting process?
"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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Canada GrizzlyClaws Offline
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@Panthera 

Tiger canine often displays this type of tendency, whereas this one could be an old male bearing with a lot of abrasion on its teeth.

That's why the dent now looks more glaringly obvious.
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Netherlands peter Offline
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( This post was last modified: 06-22-2020, 08:56 AM by peter )

PHANTERA

In order to answer the questions, we need better pictures and accurate measurements. Here's an instruction. 

a - Photographs

1 - A photograph from the side showing the complete skull resting on a flat surface

2 - A photograph from the top down (a bit like the picture you posted, but better)

3 - A photograph from the occiput (the last part of the upper skull) 

4 - A photograph taken from the front (showing the teeth and the rostrum)

Try to reduce the angles, as they often result in distortion (and incorrect conclusions). When you take pictures of the occiput, remember it's about the shape of the occiput seen from above and from behind.   

b - Measurements

We need accurate measurements of the upper skull. In order to do it right, you have to remove the mandibula. Only use the upper skull. Every measurement has to be taken in a straight line from tip to tip: 

5 - A measurement from the tip of the maxillary bone (not including the incisors) to the tip of the occiput (greatest total length)

6 - A tip-to-tip measurement of the arches at the point of greatest width (zygomatic width)

7 - A measurement of the rostrum (the bone just above the upper canines)

In order to assist, I scanned the picture you posted and added numbers (1 = greatest total length, 2 = greatest width and 3 = rostrum width):


*This image is copyright of its original author
 

c - Conclusions for now

1 - The sagittal crest isn't straight. The skull has a lot of superfluous growths. The skull is asymmetrical and quite fragile. The upper canines are fragile as well. My guess is the skull belonged to a tiger born and raised in captivity, most probably a male. All sutures are closed, meaning the tiger was adult.  

2 - The shape of the nasal bones, the eye-sockets, the arches and, in particular, the occiput (relatively long, narrow and triangular at the tip) suggest the owner of the skull could have been a Java tiger.  

3 - Wild male Indian tigers average about 350 mm. in greatest total skull length, whereas wild male Java tigers average about 325 mm. A large male Java tiger could get close to the length of an average male Indian tiger.  

d - History

In order to answer all questions, contact the one who sold you the cast. Ask him to tell you anything he knows (what facility, when, subspecies, age, disease and photographs). The more you know, the better. If you know more, try to contact the director of the facility (or the keeper). 

As to the shape of the upper canines. In the tiger extinction thread, an article was posted about an old captive male Amur tiger in a Japanese zoo. The tiger had similar upper canines. I don't know when the article was posted, meaning you're on your own here (it's a long thread).   

Wild adult male Indian tigers (Panthera tigris tigris) have longer skulls than adult wild male Java tigers, but individual variation in wild tigers usually is quite pronounced. Skulls of captive tigers usually are shorter and, in particular, wider. In zoo cats, however, anything is possible.   

If you have time, measure the height (or depth). Place the skull on a flat surface and measure the distance between the bottom and the top in a straight line. If possible, also weigh the skull (lower and upper jaw separately). 

If it is the skull of a (large) Java tiger, my advice is to keep it.
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Taiwan Panthera Offline
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( This post was last modified: 06-23-2020, 08:14 AM by Rishi )

(06-21-2020, 10:08 PM)Pckts Wrote:
(06-21-2020, 07:05 PM)Panthera Wrote: Hello, 
I was told this replica skull is a Bengal tiger, the head length is 355mm, canine length is 58mm.
Is this in the range of Bengal tiger?
I feel that the posterior contour of canine seem oddly, it has a dented, both canines are. Is it normal? 


*This image is copyright of its original author




*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author

Very odd indeed, maybe something off during the casting process?

I am also thought, but some people said it maybe is a old individual and abrasion on its teeth. Thank you for your reply.

(06-22-2020, 01:51 AM)GrizzlyClaws Wrote: @Panthera 

Tiger canine often displays this type of tendency, whereas this one could be an old male bearing with a lot of abrasion on its teeth.

That's why the dent now looks more glaringly obvious.

Thank you for your reply. This is possible- abrasion on teeth .
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