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Reintroduction of Wolves and Lynx into Britain

United Kingdom Sully Offline
Ecology and Conservation
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#31
( This post was last modified: 01-18-2020, 08:36 PM by Sully )

"We know that Eurasian lynx went extinct here during the medieval period, due to human persecution and habitat loss, but no group has looked at the genetics of the extinct British population. 

The lynx genetic family tree is also fairly simple and there is only one branch found in Western Europe, which simplifies decisions for where to source a stock population. For this it might make sense to look at the Dinaric Alps, where successful translocations have already been done, and a healthy population exists."

Full article on how ancient DNA can help us gain insight into rewilding and reintroduction 
"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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United Kingdom Sully Offline
Ecology and Conservation
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#32

Third of brits would reintroduce wolves and lynxes to the UK, and a quarter want to bring back bears 

Most would also like to see lost bird species return
In recent years the “rewilding” movement has lobbied for the reintroduction of wolves, bears and other once-native species that are now extinct in the UK. Advocates say these long-absent fauna can benefit the ecosystem, reverse some of the effects of climate change and drive tourism. Opponents worry that they’ll spread diseasedamage the farming industry and eat people.
New YouGov polling reveals overwhelming public support for the idea: four in five Brits (82%) want to see extinct species returned to the UK.
So which animals do the public want to bring back – and which would they prefer to leave in the past?
Wolves and lynxes and bears – oh my
Many in the rewilding movement have argued for the environmental benefits of reintroducing apex predators.  While the less dangerous animals are more popular candidates for revival, a significant minority of Brits still want to see beasts of prey return to the ecosystem.
The most popular are wolves and lynxes: more than four in ten rewilding supporters (44% and 45% respectively) would like to see them brought back, amounting to over a third (36% for both) of the wider population. And while brown bears are perhaps the most dangerous animal on our list, three in ten (30%) of these supporters (and 24% of Brits overall) want them to return.  
The bird is the word for most rewilding advocates
Most rewilding supporters want to see lost bird species reintroduced to the UK: around eight in ten of those who support rewilding want to bring back spoonbills, cranes, Dalmatian pelicans and other waders (79%), and a similar proportion (83%) would be happy to see new populations of raptors such as goshawks, ospreys, and white-tailed eagles.

*This image is copyright of its original author

The successful existing examples of revived species such as the red kite (now so common in parts of the UK that some villagers consider it a dog-nappingbarbecue-wrecking pest) could account for some of this popularity.
It may be a similar story with beavers, which already exist in small UK colonies, and which three-quarters (76%) would see reintroduced on a larger scale. Many even say they’d like once-native species which were wiped out thousands of years ago – such as bison (35%) – to make a return.  
See the full results here
"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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United Kingdom Sully Offline
Ecology and Conservation
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#33

Why Britain is less wild than the rest of Europe



"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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United Kingdom Sully Offline
Ecology and Conservation
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#34

From the book "Scotland A Rewilding Journey"


*This image is copyright of its original author
"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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United Kingdom Sully Offline
Ecology and Conservation
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#35

More from the same book, the degradation of land ecological integrity from loss of forests and keystone predators has had an impact on the sea, as too has the commercial fishing industry 

*This image is copyright of its original author
"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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United Kingdom Sully Offline
Ecology and Conservation
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#36

Sounds good though I hear they're fox hunters, this could be a glorified big game park

Rewilding: Farmers plan to turn East Anglia into one of the world’s largest restored nature reserves

Bison, beavers and even lynx could be reintroduced in some parts of Norfolk and Suffolk as grand scheme to link and extend areas dedicated to wildlife is launched, writes Harry Cockburn
"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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