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Personal Opinion & Speculations

Norway Pantherinae Offline
Bigcat Enthusiast
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#31

(01-26-2019, 06:51 PM)Spalea Wrote:
(01-26-2019, 04:45 PM)Pantherinae Wrote:
(01-26-2019, 04:19 PM)Spalea Wrote: @Pantherinae :

Agree with you, but we have to admit that the main wolves's asset is their high sociability degree, "all for one and all for one" ! Individually they aren't as formidable as that, as you said. During the fight as natural offensive weapon, they only have a powerful jaw at their disposal. But as concerns the group, the prides of predators, they are the top one: high collective intelligence and extreme stamina.
100%, but hyenas have the same problem that they only have their jaws, but they are stronger than a wolf at the same weight imo. There is many that belives a wolf could compeate with a Hyena one on one which imo is ludicrous. That is why I say, I feel they are overrated. Still a formidable animal, but it is in packs they are one of the most dangerous animal.  

Spalea, do you have an opinion that you feel is a little unpopular? I would love to hear if you have one :)

I spoke about canids, not hyaenidae. The spotted hyenas are scavenger i.e. animals which is more used than Wolf to direct confrontations with other powerful predators. And also because they are scavenger they have an extremely strong neck (to dismember a big corpse and to extract the viscera). Thus the morphology isn't the same. The wolves are pure predator, not at all scavengers like the hyenas. Of course they are able to defend a prey's corpse but they don't insist if their opponents is much more powerful (a grizzly bear for example), in this case they would prefer to flee from it. On the other hand the main spotted hyena's morphology fault is that it doesn't allow it to twirl around itself when aggressed: you see the numerous cases in which we can see some jackal biting it in the hindquarters or in the rump ? These jackals wouldn't do that with a wolf.

An opinion about animals I would think unpopular ? Hmm let me think about it !

Yes I know you did, I just compared them, as you mentioned the wolves are only having the jaws to fight with the same as the hyena, only the hyenas being tougher. 

Yes the hyenas aren exatly acobatic they are mostly buildt to be tough and heavy at the back. And yes jackals would be stupid to try nipping at a wolf. 
Wolves are insanely fast too! 

Can’t wait to hear it :)
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Sully Offline
Ecology & Rewilding
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#32

My main unpopular opinion is that the crocodile is an overrated hunter. I've seen many videos of prey waltzing virtually millimeters away and even on a croc, and the croc doesn't manage to clamp on or if it does, doesn't manage to execute the kill. They seem very inefficient which ultimately doesn't matter due to the volume of prey. Though I confess I haven't yet looked into success rates, this is an observation I've made.
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BorneanTiger Offline
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#33
( This post was last modified: 05-06-2020, 10:22 PM by BorneanTiger )

Even if there are Arabian leopards (see this thread) in Wadi Wurayah in the UAE section of the Hajar Mountains, bordering northern Oman, it's hard to verify that claim: https://outdooruae.com/articles/hiking-t...n-the-uae/

Suffice to say that a footprint of a leopard was photographed by D. Egan in a shallow rock cave in the wadi in 2004: http://www.catsg.org/fileadmin/fileshari...pdf#page=2
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United States Lycaon Offline
أسد الأطلس
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#34

I think that there still are barbary lions , atlas leopard and bear in some remote areas of north africa.
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United Kingdom Asad981 Offline
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#35
( This post was last modified: 05-08-2020, 08:22 AM by Rishi )

In my honest opinion, in terms of predation feats, the puma beats the leopard.



This is my personal opinion.

I belive the most powerful prey a single lion can kill are 
  • Cape buffalo bulls                      
  • Giraffe bulls
  • Adult crocodiles (Nile & Mugger)
  • Indian buffalo (Wild & Domestic)
  • Good sized young elephants
  • Maybe maybe maybe a female hippo or black rhino cow (I have a modern scientific record of a single lion badly mauling a black rhino cow and killing her calf)
Also the Asiatic lion has been recorded killing water buffaloes so considering all those I am pretty convinced a single lion is more than capable of killing a bull gaur, atleast an average one.
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United States Styx38 Offline
Regular Member
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#36

(05-08-2020, 04:27 AM)Asad981 Wrote: In my honest opinion, in terms of predation feats, the puma beats the leopard.




This is my personal opinion.

I belive the most powerful prey a single lion can kill are 
  • Cape buffalo bulls                      
  • Giraffe bulls
  • Adult crocodiles (Nile & Mugger)
  • Indian buffalo (Wild & Domestic)
  • Good sized young elephants
  • Maybe maybe maybe a female hippo or black rhino cow (I have a modern scientific record of a single lion badly mauling a black rhino cow and killing her calf)
Also the Asiatic lion has been recorded killing water buffaloes so considering all those I am pretty convinced a single lion is more than capable of killing a bull gaur, atleast an average one.

1. Depends on the area.

However, the biggest ungulate Leopards have killed are Eland Cows, which are equal to or bigger than the Shiras Moose that Cougars have killed.


2. Speaking of Asiatic Lions killing domestic Buffalo, Leopards have also killed adult Water Buffalo (albeit in the lower age class).


*This image is copyright of its original author


Miller et. al. (2015) "Livestock losses and hotspots of attack from tigers and leopards in Kanha Tiger Reserve, Central India"


For Water Buffalo ages, I searched up growth stages, I found these:




 "According to their age and sex, the animals were divided into four i.e. A1 (young male, 1 - 2 years), A2(young female, 1 - 2 years), B1 (adult male, 3 - 6 years) and B2 (adult female 3 - 6 years)."


 PANHWAR et. al. 2007 "Gross Anatomical Studies on Normal Heart of Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis)"
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Germany Sammyfrosh Offline
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#37

(06-11-2018, 12:11 PM)Spalea Wrote: @Pantherinae :

I don't want to take part in this discussion by giving the name of the "lucky winner" felid. But:


1) By arguing in accordance with the "Pound for pound" concept, the more smaller an animal is, the more stronger he is... It's a fact that the most powerful animal on Earth are the insects. No one mammal can accomplish "Pound for pound" what a lone ant (I could consider an infinite number of other insects) would be able to do. And that by very far. Thus, within the same animals family we consider here i.e. the big cats, the pantherinae, the most "pound for pound" powerful cat would be the leopard. Logically, being the smallest big cat... Why not ? Because being not an apex predator it makes such feats we don't never see among the other big cats (climbing onto a tree with a big prey only held in its mouth). Logically, but I don't want to go further in this argumentation.

2) Therefore, only one comparaison would be fair: to consider two animals at equal weight. Among the big cats, tiger, lion, jaguar and leopard only the first two have an equivalent weight at first sight, the tiger and the lion.

And we risk a "tiger vs lion" debate... These both animals are differently agenced according to the environment in which they live. Each of the two are apex predator, the tiger individually is the most amazing, the most fascinating but the lions have other assets from their social way of live.

Then...

I would be more inclined to agree more. The smaller the animal is the more powerful it is pound for pound.
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Germany Sammyfrosh Offline
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#38
( This post was last modified: 10-09-2020, 03:23 PM by Sammyfrosh )

In my own honest opinion and from what have witness being from a particular place in Africa, I believe the leopard is indeed the most strongest cat alive  pound for pound then comes the tiger after that.

It's might be the smallest of the big cat but make no mistake as it's power to weight ratio is astonishing and insane to say the least.

I mean it's not everyday you see a cat lift a prey more than it's own weight up a vertical tree like there's no effort being put into it.
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Italy Spalea Offline
Wildanimal Lover
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#39

An interesting and not biased video about this subject: tigers free in the African savvanah, what would be happen ?






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Australia LandSeaLion Offline
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#40

(09-30-2021, 02:19 PM)Spalea Wrote: An interesting and not biased video about this subject: tigers free in the African savvanah, what would be happen ?







Good video. I am skeptical about the likelihood of success of Tiger Canyon’s stated aim to introduce wild tigers to Africa, and feel the project has more to do with tourism than it does with conservation.

To thrive in Africa and stand a chance against prides of lions or large clans of hyenas, tigers would have to transition to being a social animal. Their fondness for water would also be a great weakness, so they would have to become largely water-avoidant. In short…they would essentially have to adapt to become like lions. 

Tiger Canyon isn’t a great example of tigers thriving in Africa, as they are in a much more controlled environment, absent of conflict and competition (other than between the tigers themselves, of course). If lions and hyenas were to be introduced…I think it would get very ugly for the tigers.
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Italy Spalea Offline
Wildanimal Lover
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#41

@LandSeaLion :

About #40: agree with what you say. Tiger is a discreet animal, compared to the lions... I cannot imagine how it could support daily-life in Africa savannah. The coexistance with other big predators isn't at all a matter of physical features.

As the author's video says, "Tiger Canyon" is only a sort of attraction park, closed to the public, where a few tigers, cheetahs and, by way of potential preys, infortunates wildebeests, gazelles and ostrichs were released.
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United States Styx38 Offline
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#42
( This post was last modified: 10-23-2021, 05:36 AM by Styx38 )

I know this is technically a domestic animal, but pitbulls should not owned by normal people. Only people certified to take care of dangerous breeds or other vicious animals. 

They are aggressive and can maul people as well as other animals to death.
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Guatemala GuateGojira Offline
Expert & Researcher
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#43

(10-05-2021, 02:50 AM)LandSeaLion Wrote: To thrive in Africa and stand a chance against prides of lions or large clans of hyenas, tigers would have to transition to being a social animal. Their fondness for water would also be a great weakness, so they would have to become largely water-avoidant. In short…they would essentially have to adapt to become like lions. 

This statment shows how marvelous is nature and I am fully agree with it. Basically, if you have a "X" big cat, and you put it in close habitat with large but low density prey, abundant water and few competitors, you will get the solitary tiger. But if you put the same "X" big cat in an open habitat with large high density prey, few water and plenty of social competitors, you will get the social lion. Nature is about adaptations, and like LandSeaLion says, the tiger in Africa will need to became a "lion" to survive, because that is what nature have done with the original "X" big cat. And we saw that in the Indian lion, they are not as social as African lions, they live in small prides with relatively low density prey (that is why they are habitual domestic cattle killers) and they avoid the close areas of the Indian subcontinent. How knows what would happen to lions in India in a couple of millions years (without humans of course), after all we saw it with the cave "lion-like" felids of the Pleistocene, they trive from Europe to North America thanks to the open sabana-like habitat and giant prey, but when climate changed and forest arise, they could not adapt and got exting in all the planet!
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