There is a world somewhere between reality and fiction. Although ignored by many, it is very real and so are those living in it. This forum is about the natural world. Here, wild animals will be heard and respected. The forum offers a glimpse into an unknown world as well as a room with a view on the present and the future. Anyone able to speak on behalf of those living in the emerald forest and the deep blue sea is invited to join.
--- Peter Broekhuijsen ---

  • 2 Vote(s) - 4 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
ON THE EDGE OF EXTINCTION - C - THE JAGUAR (Panthera onca)

Finland Shadow Offline
Moderator
*****
Moderators
( This post was last modified: 10-13-2019, 02:25 AM by Shadow )

(10-13-2019, 01:14 AM)lionjaguar Wrote:
(10-12-2019, 08:15 PM)Shadow Wrote:
(10-12-2019, 06:55 AM)lionjaguar Wrote:
(10-12-2019, 06:16 AM)Pckts Wrote: This is Marley, 



In this video he had already beaten this male a week earlier and the male is just trying to save face but wasn't seen really after this.

Then this is Marley here as well



Marley had been mating with this female then saw this Giant male sitting atop the bank, Marley rushed up to run the male off and then the giant male turned the tables and whooped Marley and sent him swimming for his life.
That male had never been seen by Paulo before that, but Paulo said hes easily larger than Adriano. I saw that male mating with a giant female named Hunter on my trip.

What makes marley special is that he was born and raised in the meetings of the 3 rivers and he never left *very rare*
Marley also isn't the largest male but he has battled and defeated many larger males and hes also lost many as you see but he never leaves, his grit makes him a mainstay there for now. 

You can read all about my trip with Paulo and the pantanal here 
https://wildfact.com/forum/topic-your-wi...nal-brazil

From what I heard, this is Scarface. The jaguar who was beaten by Marley or Juru from your post. I guess Scarface disappeared or died then.









2nd video of Marley 
I can't tell which jaguars are actually bigger. 'Giant male' looks bigger because he is on top and smashing Marley. Their fight looks nothing compared to lions or street cats. Swing their front legs just like teenage girls fighting.

I can't understand what you wrote. born and raised in the meetings of the three rivers?? He never left?

Quote:What makes marley special is that he was born and raised in the meetings of the 3 rivers and he never left *very rare*

I have to ask, that what you are now trying to find out here?

You talk about it, how jaguars fight. They seem to fight like all other big cats, don´t they? Idea of territorial fight isn´t always to kill another, just to make it to submit and leave the area. In extreme cases another one gets seriously injured or killed.

Lions are unique among big cats in that way, that they form coalitions and prides. So their fights have more variations from 1-1 to many different kind of compositions, when there can be one lion against coalition or coalitions against each others etc. Some say, that life of a male lion is as harsh as it can get, maybe it is. But it doesn´t mean, that it would be easy for other species.

What comes to Marley, it looks obvious what @Pckts means. Marley is one of the rare jaguars, who have born at Pantanal and have managed to survive there to adulthood and claim their own territory. When normally jaguars born in Pantanal are forced to leave that area as youngsters by bigger adult ones.

What comes to sizes and to whom you trust as sources. You have right to question guides who earn money from tourists. Still when you look closer, not only guides tell about big jaguars. Also valid and credible people doing scientific research (zoologists/biologists) confirm, that there are some very big ones in Pantanal area. When looking at it, that how credible someone is, it´s good to look at it too, that does someone talk a lot of things, which are in contradiction with confirmed facts found out by scientific research. For instance this guide Paulo looks like to be ok, not giving statements without reasoning.

But it would be good if you could clarify a bit, that what you are now seeking here? And saying, that jaguars are "just like teenage girls fighting" doesn´t make you look good. Disagreements are inevitable sometimes, but if you don´t respect wildlife and wild animals, what are you doing here? For me statements like that look like disrespecting certain species. Especially when that same phrase can be used to describe also lions, tigers, leopards etc. when looking at certain incidents. It just is so, that not all fights are as serious as others. Still many jaguars have nasty scars reminding about fights, which have been more serious ones.

I think that is your persona opinion. Your country don't even have any big cats, but both of my parents are from countries that had jaguars and lions. They are culturally associated us. I respect them more than anyone because my parents are from the Middle East and Latin America. What makes you to think I am not respecting jaguars, and any other animals after reading my post? It is your own personal mistake problem if you think I am insulting jaguars for saying, "just like teenage girls fighting."

I made pretty clear question, that what are you trying to find out here? Your postings are somewhat odd now. Are you seeking for some information or do you have something to say? 

And yes, your postings look like it, that you don´t respect jaguars. It also looks like, that you misunderstand some things on purpose. Like what @Pckts wrote about jaguar Marley. It wasn´t that difficult to understand.

Your "tone" also is odd here, when mentioned how you write about animals. If you continue like that, you better find some other forum.
3 users Like Shadow's post
Reply

Venezuela epaiva Offline
Moderator
*****
Moderators
( This post was last modified: 10-25-2019, 02:48 AM by epaiva )

Measurements of North American Jaguars skulls
A Book of the Boone and Crockett Club
Book Record of North American Big Game Eight Edition 1981

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author
7 users Like epaiva's post
Reply

United States lionjaguar Offline
Member
**
( This post was last modified: 10-30-2019, 05:22 AM by lionjaguar )

(07-02-2014, 07:23 PM)Amnon242 Wrote:
(05-16-2014, 06:36 PM)Pckts Wrote: Nice info Peter.

About beats, I am reading more and more about Polar Bears. They are very like, it seems. Impossible to read their emotions and to tell what they will do. Trainers say they just walk and sway their long neck and head back n forth never giving you any signs of what they are thinking. 
Outside of the point, but still interesting. 

Saturday I talked to a big cat breeeder in a zoo. I gave him the vs. lion fight question, he expressed his opinion, but he also stated that jaguar would be serious oponent to any big cat - due to his speed and agility.  

 

I am not going to start this debate besides this post since someone in Finland was barking about it.
How do you or your breeder actually believe animal can win against larger animals who were twice bigger than itself?
Male or female jaguars would be dead if they actually fight with male lion. Even if it was male jaguar in Los Llanos and Pantanal. It won't match against the male lion. Maybe that big cat breeder needs to study more. I guess he believes Yorkshire Terrier would give difficult time to Eurasian lynx or Maine Coon would be serious opponent to small cougar in Latin America.
Reply

United States lionjaguar Offline
Member
**

(10-25-2019, 02:47 AM)epaiva Wrote: Measurements of North American Jaguars skulls
A Book of the Boone and Crockett Club
Book Record of North American Big Game Eight Edition 1981

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

Thanks for posting!! I would like to point out is that book is not perfect. I don't think the jaguar lived in Big Bend National Park, Texas.
1 user Likes lionjaguar's post
Reply

United States lionjaguar Offline
Member
**
( This post was last modified: 10-30-2019, 01:42 AM by lionjaguar )

Brazil and Mexico have the highest various habitats and ecosystems in jaguar historical range map. These 2 countries probably had a most stimulating jaguars.

Historical and present distribution of Mexican jaguars. Potential habitat for jaguars in Mexico as defined by the ensemble model (EM). Protected areas and Jaguar Conservation Units (JCUs), (1) Sonora, (2) Jalisco, (3) Istmo de Tehuantepec, (4) Selva Maya, (5) Sierra Tamaulipas, (6) Sierra Madre Oriental (Sanderson et al., 2002): [url]https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1472-4642.2010.00740.x[/url]


*This image is copyright of its original author



Old jaguar photo in the Yucatan Peninsula.

*This image is copyright of its original author


Location is unknown. I assume it was from the Yucatan too.

*This image is copyright of its original author
3 users Like lionjaguar's post
Reply

Netherlands peter Offline
Expert & Researcher
*****
Moderators
( This post was last modified: 10-30-2019, 03:31 AM by peter )

LIONJAGUAR

That " ...  someone ... barking ... " (referring to your remark in post 199) is Shadow. He's a mod. I asked him to join the team. There was a reason and that reason still is very valid. He's a good mod, that is.

Mods apply rules. A member mocking a mod is saying he's not interested in forum rules. Meaning he didn't qualify for membership. Also meaning he's close to the exit. 

Your last post (on Mexican jaguars) is ok. If you mix good info with respect from now on, you can continue. If you don't, it's game over.
2 users Like peter's post
Reply

United Kingdom Sully Offline
Predator Enthusiast
****

Ayahuasca tourism an overlooked driver of trade in jaguar body parts, researchers say
by Mongabay.com on 30 October 2019

  • According to research published in the journal Conservation Science and Practice earlier this month, the booming ayahuasca tourism industry may be an overlooked threat facing jaguars, a most iconic species that is listed as Nearly Threatened on the IUCN Red List.
  • Through discussions with street vendors, shamans, and individuals working in the tourism industry, researchers found that jaguar canine pendants, jaguar skin bracelets, and other jaguar products are being sold to tourists under the pretense that they somehow enhance the ayahuasca experience.
  • The researchers suggest that one way to effectively halt this growing illicit trade is to more formally regulate ayahuasca tourism and educate both tourists and tour operators.
Jaguars face a number of threats, from habitat destruction and fragmentation for agriculture to poaching, trophy hunting, and retaliatory killings by ranchers. The cats are estimated to have lost nearly half of their historic range and to have declined by as much as 20 to 25 percent over the past three generations, which is why the species is listed as Nearly Threatened on the IUCN Red List.
According to research published in the journal Conservation Science and Practice earlier this month, there may be an overlooked threat facing this most iconic of species: the booming ayahuasca tourism industry.
The trade in jaguar body parts is growing across Latin America, particularly in Bolivia, Brazil, Costa Rica, Peru, and Suriname. Over the past few years, the most serious new threat to jaguars that has emerged is the illegal trade in jaguar fangs for the Chinese market. But according to a team of researchers led by Alexander Braczkowski of Australia’s University of Queensland, “commercialized ayahuasca tourism may be an undervalued contributor to the trade” in jaguar body parts.

*This image is copyright of its original author
Jaguar skin for sale in the Passage Paquito section of Belen market, Iquitos. Photo Credit: Steve Winter/National Geographic.
“In Southeast Asia, jaguar claws and teeth are worn as jewellery; their skins are bought for home decor; and a glue paste (made from boiled jaguar parts) is consumed to heal various ailments,” Braczkowski and co-authors write in the paper. “Most organized trafficking appears to be by contractors working for foreign companies hired to hunt cats to export body parts. With Latin America’s current ayahuasca and shamanic tourist boom there are additional demands for jaguar products.”
Braczkowski and team conducted an investigation between August 2016 and August 2019 into the jaguar parts trade in markets in three Peruvian cities that are considered top ayahuasca tourism destinations: Lima, Iquitos, and Pucallpa. They found jaguar skins for sale at prices ranging from $49 to $152, paws that could be purchased for $9, jaguar skin purses available for $6, and stuffed jaguars heads for which the asking price was anywhere from $30 to $91. Jaguar canines can fetch between $61 and $122 each.
“Every single place we went to look for jaguar skins, jaguar teeth, we found them,” Sharon Guynup, a co-author of the paper, told Mongabay.

*This image is copyright of its original author
Jaguar teeth for sale in the Passage Paquito section of Belen market, Iquitos. Photo Credit: Steve Winter/National Geographic.
Through discussions with street vendors, shamans, and people working in the tourism industry, the researchers found that jaguar canine pendants, jaguar skin bracelets, and other jaguar products are being sold to tourists under the pretense that they somehow enhance the ayahuasca experience. Ayahuasca is a psychoactive brew made from the ayahuasca vine (Banisteriopsis caapi) and chakruna leaves (Psychotria viridis). It has traditionally been used for spiritual and physical healing in ritual shamanic ceremonies, but has also become popular among recreational users in recent decades.
“This appears to be a case of rebranding, specifically using ‘ayahuasca marketing’ for sellers to charge a premium on jaguar parts,” the researchers write in the paper. “Local indigenous shamans and healers from the Pucallpa area (Shipibo, Conibo, and Ashaninka ethnicities) denied the notion that jaguar parts enhance the ayahuasca experience for visiting tourists, and suggested that this practice is being marketed by ‘charlatan shamans’ seeking financial gain from the ayahuasca boom.”
The researchers suggest that one way to effectively halt this growing illicit trade is to more formally regulate ayahuasca tourism and educate both tourists and tour operators. “The shamans we encountered in Iquitos and Pucallpa stressed the importance of the jaguar to the Amazon ecosystem and as a powerful totem in the spiritual world,” they write in the paper. “The leadership of ayahuasca retreats could be important champions for jaguar conservation in Peru, Costa Rica, Colombia, Brazil, and other regions where ayahuasca is used, and they could discourage tourists from using jaguar parts.”

*This image is copyright of its original author
Jaguar teeth and a jaguar skull for sale in a craft market in Yarinacocha Market, Pucallpa. Photo Credit: Alex Braczkowski.
Peru already has a national anti‐wildlife trafficking policy in place that punishes traffickers with a prison sentence of 3 to 5 years. Guynup said that, during their investigation of local markets, the researchers found a number of purveyors of jaguar products who exercised caution in their dealings with would-be buyers, suggesting that there has been some enforcement of anti-wildlife trafficking laws. But she called for the government of Peru to be more aggressive in enforcing its laws.
“The Peruvian government needs to recognize that this is happening and address it. There are good wildlife laws in Peru, I think they need to be better enforced and if they’re not, there’s very little reason for this trade to end,” Guynup said.
“A big factor here is also education, for ayahuasca tourists and for tourists in general, not only on the plight of jaguars but the plight of endangered species in general. It’s not that this trade is specifically [due to] ayahuasca tourism, there’s a much broader trade that does include trade to Asia. But this is a piece of the puzzle and it’s really important for potential consumers to be aware of this and not participate.”

*This image is copyright of its original author
Jaguars in Mato Grosso Sur, Brazil. Photo Credit: Steve Winter/National Geographic.
*This image is copyright of its original author
A jaguar in Mato Grosso Sur, Brazil. Photo Credit: Steve Winter/National Geographic.
CITATIONS
• Braczkowski, A., Ruzo, A., Sanchez, F., Castagnino, R., Brown, C., Guynup, S., … & O’Bryan, C. (2019). The ayahuasca tourism boom: An undervalued demand driver for jaguar body parts?. Conservation Science and Practice. doi:10.1111/csp2.126
• Quigley, H., Foster, R., Petracca, L., Payan, E., Salom, R. & Harmsen, B. 2017. Panthera onca (errata version published in 2018). The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2017: e.T15953A123791436. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2017-3.RLTS.T15953A50658693.en. Downloaded on 30 October 2019.
Editor’s Note: A co-author of the paper, Romi Castagnino, works for Mongabay LatAm. She had no editorial input on this article


https://news.mongabay.com/2019/10/ayahua...chers-say/
"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
5 users Like Sully's post
Reply

United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
Senior Member
****
( This post was last modified: 11-03-2019, 10:32 AM by BorneanTiger )

A 2019 survey by the Center of Biological Diversity found the construction of Trump's wall to have a devastating impact on the ecosystem, with construction coming perilously close to the San Bernardino National Wildlife Refuge in Arizona, and an active migration corridor for the North American jaguar, as well as already damaging habitats in sites such as San Bernardino Slaughter Ranch. The survey also found unrestricted pumping of groundwater from local aquifers in order to produce concrete for the wall, which will have a destructive habitat on subterranean ecosystems as well as surface ones that are sustained by groundwater: https://biologicaldiversity.org/w/news/p...019-10-31/https://www.azpm.org/p/home-articles-new...n-arizona/

On the positive side, the impeachment inquiry by the Democrat-controlled House of Representatives against Trump has began, so let's see whether or not the #impeachtrump movement can save San Bernardino and the jaguars that migrate between Mexico and the USA: https://edition.cnn.com/politics/live-ne...index.html

San Bernadino, Arizona; credit: Ariana Brocious

*This image is copyright of its original author
2 users Like BorneanTiger's post
Reply

United Kingdom Sully Offline
Predator Enthusiast
****

Jaguars under threat from palm oil expansion 

Unsustainable palm oil production has created many environmental problems in Asia, with swathes of tropical rainforest bulldozed to make way for plantations, and with them the habitats that many animals depend on.

Cat conservation charity Panthera has warned that mammals in Latin America may be facing the same threat.

Their new report, published last month in Frontiers in Forest and Global Change, outlines the potential threats expanding plantations in countries like Columbia could pose, and suggests ways that palm oil could still be produced whilst minimising the impact on iconic species such as jaguars.


Oil palm production is expanding rapidly in Latin America, and this region is poised to become the second-largest palm oil producing region in the world after Southeast Asia. This has the potential to severely disrupt mammal communities.
The charity says this could be especially dangerous for jaguars, a large-bodied species which requires huge areas of connected forest to survive. Unlike some smaller cat species such as ocelots, jaguars will not live in plantations and cannot survive on the rodents present in them.
The new roads that come alongside new plantations will also deter jaguars – females in particular are known to actively avoid roads. This will in turn limit jaguar territory and connectivity, and affect their density.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Oil palm plantation in Puerto Wilches, Columbia. Uniform planting of the palm can deter wildlife, as many animals require a complex understory. © Panthera 
However, as the report explains, it is not necessary to utilise these native forest areas and wetlands that are core jaguar habitats for oil palm production.
There are plenty of adequate overgrazed farmlands that oil producers could use instead. These landscapes are already degraded and do not have the same high conservation value as native forests.
“Palm oil expansion doesn’t have to be at the expense of native forests. New palm oil frontiers should occur in degraded ecosystems, without the requirement of new infrastructure. Road creation and upgrading is a catalyst for both habitat loss and overhunting, two major drivers of mammal extinction,” explains Dr. Esteban Payán, lead author of the report and director of Panthera’s South America Jaguar Program.
It is also possible for oil palm plantations to actively support the activities of native wildlife. If these plantations are close to well-conserved forests and include small forest patches and water-adjacent forest areas, they can be used as corridors and stepping stones for dispersing species. The key is to avoid vast unbroken plantations that cut off forest patches and isolate populations.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Animals such as jaguar require water-adjacent riparian forests to use as corridors across plantations. © Panthera 
This would however require serious adjustments in the way plantations are managed, as well as well-informed land planning and governance.
Oil palm producers can also limit their impact on the native wildlife by changing methods and regulations within their plantations.  If oil palm is planted heterogeneously rather than uniformly across the landscape, and complex understories are preserved then mammal diversity is likely be richer, as has been observed in Southeast Asia. This is also thought to protect the palm from insects and other pests, so a win-win situation, according to the report.
The charity also recommends that harvests be done manually, to decrease the use of wildlife-disturbing machinery and to maximise employment, resulting in socio-economic benefits for local people.
Avoiding twilight and night-time work-hours would also benefit wildlife by allowing animals to adapt to circadian activity rhythms with minimum disturbance and noise, as well as giving nocturnal predators the time and space to hunt.
Further recommendations include crossings on drainage canals to accommodate land animals, and the prohibition of hunting and fires to further protect biodiversity.
Conservationists and institutions will have to act fast however. 21% of new plantations in Latin America were found to have come from deforestation, most notably in the Amazon and the Petén region in northern Guatemala. Columbia is now the fourth-largest palm oil producer in the world, with a growth of 42% in 2017. Of the 155,100 hectares of new oil palm plantations that were created between 2002 and 2008, 16.1% occurred in forests and natural savannas.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Deforestation for oil palm plantation in Honduras. This Central American country is now one of the largest palm oil producers in the world. © Panthera
Jaguars are rapidly losing the large territories they need to survive, and the unregulated advancement of palm oil will further diminish their habitat” explains Dr. Howard Quigley, Panthera’s jaguar program and conservation science executive director.

“However, Latin America’s palm oil industry can evolve sustainably through landscape zoning, plantation designs that preserve water and forest areas, and harvest practices. But urgent action is required.”

https://www.discoverwildlife.com/news/jaguars-under-threat-from-palm-oil-expansion/
"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
3 users Like Sully's post
Reply

Venezuela epaiva Offline
Moderator
*****
Moderators
( This post was last modified: 12-02-2019, 06:48 PM by epaiva )

Camera trap pictures of Jaguars in the South of Lake Maracaibo basin, Zulia state, Venezuela.
Credit to Proyecto Sebrada

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author
5 users Like epaiva's post
Reply

Venezuela epaiva Offline
Moderator
*****
Moderators
( This post was last modified: 12-02-2019, 07:21 PM by epaiva )

Camera trap pictures of Jaguars in South of Lake Maracaibo basin, Zulia state, Venezuela 
One of the researchers Mr Ricardo Melendez pictured  told me that they get pictures and videos from a total of 34 camera traps installed in that site.
Credit to Proyecto Sebrada a project dedicated to Jaguar Conservation.

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author
5 users Like epaiva's post
Reply

Venezuela epaiva Offline
Moderator
*****
Moderators
( This post was last modified: 12-02-2019, 07:13 PM by epaiva )

Camera trap pictures of Jaguars in the south of Lake Maracaibo basin, Zulia state, Venezuela. Mr Ricardo Melendez told me that they don't capture any Jaguar and that their estimate is that they weight from 50 to 70 kilograms in that region. The research in this region started in 2011.
Credit to Proyecto Sebrada

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author
6 users Like epaiva's post
Reply

United Kingdom Sully Offline
Predator Enthusiast
****

Jaguar collaring mission reveals flourishing population off the coast of Brazil

The Amazon is the single largest remaining stronghold for jaguars. Results from a recent camera trap survey on a protected island reserve off the coast of Brazil identified a robust population of at least 20 jaguars. Three of these individuals were collared by scientists in order to better understand the behavior of one of the Amazon’s most iconic species.
Tracking jaguars in this area will inform and improve conservation plans to protect this near threatened species. “The satellite technology fitted to the collars is providing us with hourly updates on the animals’ movements for up to eight months, resulting in a bank of information on how the jaguars use the forest to live and flourish,” explains Marcelo Oliveira, WWF-Brazil’s senior program officer.
Here’s what happened on the expedition:



*This image is copyright of its original author
© André Dib / WWF-Brazil


WWF-Brazil and partners from the Jaguar Conservation Fund and Chico Mendes Institute for Biodiversity Conservation ventured out to one of the few Amazonian islands with jaguar inhabitants.

*This image is copyright of its original author





The team of experts on the ground were able to collar three jaguars using humane capture methods - two females and one male. One of the methods attracted jaguars by placing fish in enclosures.




Before releasing these big cats back into the wild with their collars, the team performed health assessments and took blood samples from the jaguars. This information will help experts better understand the genetic makeup of jaguars on the island.


*This image is copyright of its original author
© André Dib / WWF-Brazil

A successful collaring mission: For up to eight months, the three jaguars' movements will be tracked. Location data is retrieved from the collars every hour and will help inform future jaguar conservation initiatives.
Jaguars play a key role in the health of the ecosystem in which they live, and their future is linked to protecting these same habitats. It's estimated that the recent fires in the Amazon have destroyed the habitat of at least five hundred jaguars. WWF is working in the Amazon and elsewhere to conserve jaguar habitats, and protect this big cat against threats like deforestation, human-jaguar conflict and the illegal wildlife trade.
"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
4 users Like Sully's post
Reply

Venezuela epaiva Offline
Moderator
*****
Moderators

Comparing present day Jaguar with giant Prehistoric Jaguar Panthera onca augusta 
Credit to Joshua Kiavala

*This image is copyright of its original author
4 users Like epaiva's post
Reply






Users browsing this thread:
2 Guest(s)

About Us
Go Social     Subscribe  

Welcome to WILDFACT forum, a website that focuses on sharing the joy that wildlife has on offer. We welcome all wildlife lovers to join us in sharing that joy. As a member you can share your research, knowledge and experience on animals with the community.
wildfact.com is intended to serve as an online resource for wildlife lovers of all skill levels from beginners to professionals and from all fields that belong to wildlife anyhow. Our focus area is wild animals from all over world. Content generated here will help showcase the work of wildlife experts and lovers to the world. We believe by the help of your informative article and content we will succeed to educate the world, how these beautiful animals are important to survival of all man kind.
Many thanks for visiting wildfact.com. We hope you will keep visiting wildfact regularly and will refer other members who have passion for wildlife.

Forum software by © MyBB