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ON THE EDGE OF EXTINCTION - C - THE JAGUAR (Panthera onca)

Venezuela epaiva Offline
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( This post was last modified: 05-06-2019, 01:27 AM by epaiva )

First wild Jaguar photographed in Venezuela in the year 1959 by Karl Weidmann

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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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( This post was last modified: 05-10-2019, 12:58 AM by epaiva )

Estado Bolívar, Venezuela
Credit to the late Ernesto 0. Boede

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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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( This post was last modified: 05-10-2019, 01:27 AM by epaiva )

Jaguar in Hato Pinero, Estado Cojedes in the Venezuelan Llanos
Credit to the late Ernesto O. Boede
Hato Pinero is a big ranch located in the Venezuelan Llanos about 5 hours by car from Caracas, it has more than 30 Jaguars and a good number of Pumas and Ocelots, it is the best place to see wild Jaguars in Venezuela.

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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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( This post was last modified: 05-29-2019, 10:59 PM by epaiva )

Great picture of powerful Pantanal Jaguar
Credit to @araquemoficial
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United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
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( This post was last modified: 07-11-2019, 01:47 PM by BorneanTiger )

Forward from (https://wildfact.com/forum/topic-crocodi...ion?page=6), there was a controversy over a video of a caiman defecating the carcass of a felid, identified as a jaguar, in Brazil recently:




There have been arguments that this could be a female or juvenile jaguar, or even another felid species, such as an ocelot. About the jaguar, let me clarify what the situation is with its size:

Generally, the size of jaguars increases from north to south: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4380383/https://www.earthtouchnews.com/conservat...nst-pumas/

* Central or North American jaguars, ranging from southern USA and northern Mexico in the north, to Panama in the south, are fairly small, with those in the Camela-Cuixmala Biosphere Reserve on the Mexican coast of the Pacific, northern Mexico and Belize at least weighing about 50–60 kg (110–132 pounds), similar to average cougars: https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/...75E1DC9FF5https://www.earthtouchnews.com/conservat...nst-pumas/

El Jefe the Arizonan jaguar, likely of Mexican origin: http://www.delhidailynews.com/news/El-Je...454851534/

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* Large male Northern South American jaguars (as in, South American jaguars north of the Amazon River) in the Amazonian region, which includes Guyana and Venezuela, may weigh 90–120 kg (200–260 lbs), with the average for male and female Venezuelan jaguars being respectively 95 kg (209.4 lbs) and 56.3 kg (124 lbs, similar to Central American males in Belize), and Venezuelan females weighing up to 90 kg (200 lbs): https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4380383/https://web.archive.org/web/201006202310...1-0001.pdfhttps://books.google.com/books?id=T37sFC...&q&f=false

Northern South American jaguar in Guyana: https://phys.org/news/2013-01-guyana-ple...guars.html

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* Certain Southern South American jaguars (as in, South American jaguars south of the Amazon River) from the Pantanal region are the largest of the species, with lengths of about 2.7 m (8.9 ft), and average weights of 94.8 kg (209 lbs) for males and 77.7 kg (171 lbs) for females (https://www.zobodat.at/pdf/Zeitschrift-S...6-0301.pdf). Some individuals weighed up to or more than 135 kg (298 lbs): https://web.archive.org/web/200712280610...razil.htmlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4380383/

Pantanal jaguar: https://www.tripadvisor.co.za/LocationPh...rosso.html

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United Arab Emirates BorneanTiger Offline
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( This post was last modified: 07-12-2019, 09:05 PM by BorneanTiger )

(07-11-2019, 11:53 AM)BorneanTiger Wrote: Forward from (https://wildfact.com/forum/topic-crocodi...ion?page=6), there was a controversy over a video of a caiman defecating the carcass of a felid, identified as a jaguar, in Brazil recently:




There have been arguments that this could be a female or juvenile jaguar, or even another felid species, such as an ocelot. About the jaguar, let me clarify what the situation is with its size:

Generally, the size of jaguars increases from north to south: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4380383/https://www.earthtouchnews.com/conservat...nst-pumas/

* Central or North American jaguars, ranging from southern USA and northern Mexico in the north, to Panama in the south, are fairly small, with those in the Camela-Cuixmala Biosphere Reserve on the Mexican coast of the Pacific, northern Mexico and Belize at least weighing about 50–60 kg (110–132 pounds), similar to average cougars: https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/...75E1DC9FF5https://www.earthtouchnews.com/conservat...nst-pumas/

El Jefe the Arizonan jaguar, likely of Mexican origin: http://www.delhidailynews.com/news/El-Je...454851534/

*This image is copyright of its original author


* Large male Northern South American jaguars (as in, South American jaguars north of the Amazon River) in the Amazonian region, which includes Guyana and Venezuela, may weigh 90–120 kg (200–260 lbs), with the average for male and female Venezuelan jaguars being respectively 95 kg (209.4 lbs) and 56.3 kg (124 lbs, similar to Central American males in Belize), and Venezuelan females weighing up to 90 kg (200 lbs): https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4380383/https://web.archive.org/web/201006202310...1-0001.pdfhttps://books.google.com/books?id=T37sFC...&q&f=false

Northern South American jaguar in Guyana: https://phys.org/news/2013-01-guyana-ple...guars.html

*This image is copyright of its original author


* Certain Southern South American jaguars (as in, South American jaguars south of the Amazon River) from the Pantanal region are the largest of the species, with lengths of about 2.7 m (8.9 ft), and average weights of 94.8 kg (209 lbs) for males and 77.7 kg (171 lbs) for females (https://www.zobodat.at/pdf/Zeitschrift-S...6-0301.pdf). Some individuals weighed up to or more than 135 kg (298 lbs): https://web.archive.org/web/200712280610...razil.htmlhttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4380383/

Pantanal jaguar: https://www.tripadvisor.co.za/LocationPh...rosso.html

*This image is copyright of its original author

I change my mind, it appears that even northern South American jaguars at Los Llanos, Venezuela, can be quite big: https://www.researchgate.net/publication..._evolution
"Body size of today’s jaguars is highly variable; the largest are found in the Brazilian Pantanal and Venezuelan Llanos (mean male body mass >100kg). The smallest jaguars live in Central America (~56kg)."

Venezuelan jaguar at Los Llanos: https://www.pinterest.es/pin/535506211933874521/

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Netherlands peter Offline
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( This post was last modified: 08-06-2019, 08:37 PM by peter )

CHINA'S LUST FOR JAGUARS FANGS IMPERILS BIG CATS

This is the title of a recent and interesting article in 'Nature' (February 2018). A must read for those interested in wild jaguars, I think.

The summary is things aren't looking good. As the last 4 000 tigers are quite well protected in Nepal, India, Russia, Thailand, and, to a degree, Malaysia, traffickers turned to greener pastures. South America, to be more precise. Headless jaguars turned up in Belize and it's also clear that parts of jaguars have been shipped to China from Latin America, Bolivia, Paraguay and Brazil.

Once again, China seems to be heavily involved. I know there is more research on tigers in China. I also know about the new large tiger reserve close to Russia, but trafficking still is a big problem. It has to be addressed soon, as wild tigers, in spite of the small increase in numbers in Russia, Nepal and India, continue to suffer. There's no question that they're on their way out in most of southeast Asia and Sumatra. African lions and jaguars are next on the list.   

In order to stand a chance, Chinese authorities have to move conservation, in all departments, to the top of all lists. Results are needed and they are needed now:    

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-02314-5
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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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( This post was last modified: 08-12-2019, 07:07 AM by epaiva )

Jaguars from North West of Venezuela, they look like they have good size from la zona del Sur del Lago de Maracaibo
Credit to @mongabaylatam 

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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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Female Jaguar in Parque Mirador, Río Azul y biótopo Dos Lagunas in Guatemala
Credit to Gabriel Urruela 

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Venezuela epaiva Offline
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Sharpening its claws 
Credit to Jaguars.org

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