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Ocean

Finland Shadow Offline
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#91

(07-26-2019, 08:04 AM)Rishi Wrote: Walrus found sleeping on one the crew-hatches of surfaced Russian submarine, earlier this year.

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

This case is from Kamchatka region 2006, there are many more photos. Funny incident :)
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#92

@Shadow :

About #91: even a walrus sleeps in a fetal position ! Funny accident !
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Australia GreenGrolar Offline
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#93

It looks like walruses like their time alone as well. Walruses that isolate themselves are usually sick ones ( a video posted by Graaaah years ago which has expired, the sick walrus became prey for a polar bear) and old carnivorous bull walruses.
The lime green bear
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United Kingdom Sully Offline
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#94

Cross‐genus adoptions in delphinids: One example with taxonomic discussion

Abstract

Although relatively rare, adoptions have been reported in a number of mammals, involving almost exclusively individuals of the same species, and hardly ever between species or across genera. Adoption remains poorly documented and its proximate causes are controversial. Here, we describe a unique case of a cross‐genus adoption within a small community of common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) at Rangiroa Atoll in French Polynesia. It involves a foster female adopting a presumed melon‐headed whale (Peponocephala electra) calf while already mothering its presumed biological offspring. While the inclusive fitness hypothesis can be rejected for this adult female mother, acquisition of parental skills is also unlikely to have driven adoption in parallel to natural motherhood. We argue that the primiparous foster mother’s inexperience and personality may have contributed to factors driving such non‐adaptive behavior. We also propose that the adoptee’s persistence in initiating and maintaining an association with the adult female bottlenose dolphin could have played a major role in the adoption’s ultimate success, as well as the persistence of this cross‐genus adoption after the disappearance of the biological offspring. A brief discussion of adoption and hybridization within the Delphinidae taxon is included to identify how this cross‐genus adoption fits into context of marine mammal parental care.

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/eth.12916
"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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United Kingdom Sully Offline
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#95

Some more on it here



"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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United States Pckts Offline
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#96





Deep Blue
"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#97

I confess having a sort of admiration towards morays. Even having a beautiful color, they are something reptilian... Here the green moray eel is living Western Atlantique from New Jersey, Bermuda, and the nothern part of the Mexico Gulf to Brazil. Its length is up to 2m50. Living at deepth down 40 m. The green moray is one of the 202 known species divided among 16 genera.

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Finland Shadow Offline
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#98

Orcas and dolphins, quite good footage to see how they move around.




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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#99

Whale's head...

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