There is a world somewhere between reality and fiction. Although ignored by many, it is very real and so are those living in it. This forum is about the natural world. Here, wild animals will be heard and respected. The forum offers a glimpse into an unknown world as well as a room with a view on the present and the future. Anyone able to speak on behalf of those living in the emerald forest and the deep blue sea is invited to join.
--- Peter Broekhuijsen ---
Changes in forum policies, read this thread for more detail.

  • 1 Vote(s) - 5 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Nharhu Male Lions

Spalea Offline
Wildanimal Lover
******
#46

Greg McCall-Peat: "Magic moments"


5 users Like Spalea's post
Reply

Timbavati Offline
Timbavati Enthusiast
*****
#47

Another find was the relocation of the Nharhu males that appear to have found a second pride to take care of. It’s a small pride of two lionesses that first showed up when the male lions set off from Machaton Dam and came across them only to chase them off our northern boundary. The next afternoon, responding to their roaring in the area, we located two males, one of whom was mating with a lioness from the long lost Timbavati Pride (the same pride that had white lion cubs in 2009). These lionesses have returned to the Timbavatifrom the wilderness areas of the Krugerto the east, and it remains to be seen how long they will hang around. It would be wonderful if they could set up a safe territory under the protection of the Nharhu males to the north-east of Tanda Tula Safari Camp.

Image credit.- Chad Cocking

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author
6 users Like Timbavati's post
Reply

Timbavati Offline
Timbavati Enthusiast
*****
#48


*This image is copyright of its original author
Natal pride of the Nharhu males (some of the sub-adults males are the Nharhu males.)
Credit:- Darryn Rentzke
5 users Like Timbavati's post
Reply

Poland Potato Offline
Contributor
*****
#49

(08-08-2020, 12:50 AM)TinoArmando Wrote: Another find was the relocation of the Nharhu males that appear to have found a second pride to take care of. It’s a small pride of two lionesses that first showed up when the male lions set off from Machaton Dam and came across them only to chase them off our northern boundary. The next afternoon, responding to their roaring in the area, we located two males, one of whom was mating with a lioness from the long lost Timbavati Pride (the same pride that had white lion cubs in 2009). These lionesses have returned to the Timbavatifrom the wilderness areas of the Krugerto the east, and it remains to be seen how long they will hang around. It would be wonderful if they could set up a safe territory under the protection of the Nharhu males to the north-east of Tanda Tula Safari Camp.

Image credit.- Chad Cocking

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

That is old report from February, isn't it?
Reply

Timbavati Offline
Timbavati Enthusiast
*****
#50

(08-08-2020, 10:05 PM)Potato Wrote:
(08-08-2020, 12:50 AM)TinoArmando Wrote: Another find was the relocation of the Nharhu males that appear to have found a second pride to take care of. It’s a small pride of two lionesses that first showed up when the male lions set off from Machaton Dam and came across them only to chase them off our northern boundary. The next afternoon, responding to their roaring in the area, we located two males, one of whom was mating with a lioness from the long lost Timbavati Pride (the same pride that had white lion cubs in 2009). These lionesses have returned to the Timbavatifrom the wilderness areas of the Krugerto the east, and it remains to be seen how long they will hang around. It would be wonderful if they could set up a safe territory under the protection of the Nharhu males to the north-east of Tanda Tula Safari Camp.

Image credit.- Chad Cocking

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

That is old report from February, isn't it?

Yes.
I've share these old picture because at the moment they haven't posted anything recently
1 user Likes Timbavati's post
Reply

Timbavati Offline
Timbavati Enthusiast
*****
#51

A little throwback to April 2020 with the six River Pride cubs still alive and well at Kings Camp Lodge...
Sadly, five of the six cubs have died a few weeks ago (31 July) was been update the report of the loss of the cubs..
Cathan Moore an incredible photographer saw them on the last afternoon they were all together. They headed into Klaserie and came back with only one cub...
Although until today the reasons of their death are unknown, A few factors might, lions, hyenas, or the white muscle disease...
The last cub now is roughly 6 months old, and is son of the "pale-lioness" who is one of the oldest lionesses of the River Pride
Image credit to: Cathan Moore 


*This image is copyright of its original author
4 users Like Timbavati's post
Reply

Timbavati Offline
Timbavati Enthusiast
*****
#52

Two of the three Nharhu males in the afternoon at Umlani Bushcamp
Xitaya and Skorokoro
Image credits to: Greg McCall-Peat

*This image is copyright of its original author
4 users Like Timbavati's post
Reply

Timbavati Offline
Timbavati Enthusiast
*****
#53

2/3 Nharhu males
Xitaya "Slitnose" and Skorokoro "Limping"
Image credits to: Greg McCall-Peat
Timbavati, August 2020

*This image is copyright of its original author
4 users Like Timbavati's post
Reply

Timbavati Offline
Timbavati Enthusiast
*****
#54

The River Pride featured rather prominently in our sightings last week, which was fantastic.  The pride went on a very successful run of hunting, with three kills in three successive nights (an impala, followed by two zebras).  Despite their fat bellies, the pride remained surprisingly mobile, something that has seemingly become the norm since the loss of five of their six cubs (check out our latest Sofa Safari on our Youtube channel where I discuss their fate a little more). Their movements kept taking them to the north of the concession for a couple of days at a time, before their inevitable return and the roars of the three Nharhu males that so often woke us in the early morning hours during lockdown now feel like a distant memory.
Image credit: Chad Cocking

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author
3 users Like Timbavati's post
Reply

Timbavati Offline
Timbavati Enthusiast
*****
#55

River Pride cub and his meal
Credit: Chad Cocking

*This image is copyright of its original author
3 users Like Timbavati's post
Reply

Croatia Tr1x24 Offline
Contributor
*****
#56

(08-14-2020, 08:46 PM)TinoArmando Wrote: The River Pride featured rather prominently in our sightings last week, which was fantastic.  The pride went on a very successful run of hunting, with three kills in three successive nights (an impala, followed by two zebras).  Despite their fat bellies, the pride remained surprisingly mobile, something that has seemingly become the norm since the loss of five of their six cubs (check out our latest Sofa Safari on our Youtube channel where I discuss their fate a little more). Their movements kept taking them to the north of the concession for a couple of days at a time, before their inevitable return and the roars of the three Nharhu males that so often woke us in the early morning hours during lockdown now feel like a distant memory.




5 users Like Tr1x24's post
Reply

Timbavati Offline
Timbavati Enthusiast
*****
#57

The newcomer, one of a new coalition of male lions confidently strolls through the territory of the Mbiri males 
Credit: Greg McCall-Peat

*This image is copyright of its original author
3 users Like Timbavati's post
Reply

Timbavati Offline
Timbavati Enthusiast
*****
#58

(08-14-2020, 09:14 PM)Tr1x24 Wrote:
(08-14-2020, 08:46 PM)TinoArmando Wrote: The River Pride featured rather prominently in our sightings last week, which was fantastic.  The pride went on a very successful run of hunting, with three kills in three successive nights (an impala, followed by two zebras).  Despite their fat bellies, the pride remained surprisingly mobile, something that has seemingly become the norm since the loss of five of their six cubs (check out our latest Sofa Safari on our Youtube channel where I discuss their fate a little more). Their movements kept taking them to the north of the concession for a couple of days at a time, before their inevitable return and the roars of the three Nharhu males that so often woke us in the early morning hours during lockdown now feel like a distant memory.





They looking really good...
2 users Like Timbavati's post
Reply

Poland Potato Offline
Contributor
*****
#59




3 users Like Potato's post
Reply

United States Matimbalani Offline
Regular Member
***
#60

(08-17-2020, 11:05 PM)Potato Wrote:




Haha... That pesky little cub!
1 user Likes Matimbalani's post
Reply






Users browsing this thread:
1 Guest(s)

About Us
Go Social     Subscribe  

Welcome to WILDFACT forum, a website that focuses on sharing the joy that wildlife has on offer. We welcome all wildlife lovers to join us in sharing that joy. As a member you can share your research, knowledge and experience on animals with the community.
wildfact.com is intended to serve as an online resource for wildlife lovers of all skill levels from beginners to professionals and from all fields that belong to wildlife anyhow. Our focus area is wild animals from all over world. Content generated here will help showcase the work of wildlife experts and lovers to the world. We believe by the help of your informative article and content we will succeed to educate the world, how these beautiful animals are important to survival of all man kind.
Many thanks for visiting wildfact.com. We hope you will keep visiting wildfact regularly and will refer other members who have passion for wildlife.

Forum software by © MyBB