There is a world somewhere between reality and fiction. Although ignored by many, it is very real and so are those living in it. This forum is about the natural world. Here, wild animals will be heard and respected. The forum offers a glimpse into an unknown world as well as a room with a view on the present and the future. Anyone able to speak on behalf of those living in the emerald forest and the deep blue sea is invited to join.
--- Peter Broekhuijsen ---

  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Eomellivora piveteau - Prehistoric giant Honey badger

Venezuela epaiva Offline
Moderator
*****
Moderators
#1
( This post was last modified: 10-28-2018, 11:31 PM by epaiva )


*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

*This image is copyright of its original author

Credits to @chasingmammoth and to Debian Art by Smerjeevski
4 users Like epaiva's post
Reply

United States brotherbear Offline
Grizzly Enthusiast
*****
Moderators
#2

I have read very brief hints of a big Pleistocene wolverine relative also in North America; but no real info. Vert interesting topic epaiva
 > GRIZZLY ( Ursus arctos horribilis ) the AMERICAN BROWN BEAR <  
  
             
1 user Likes brotherbear's post
Reply

Switzerland Spalea Online
Wildanimal Lover
****
#3

This beast, giant mustelid, would have been a nightmare for any opponent...
2 users Like Spalea's post
Reply

Finland Shadow Online
Regular Member
***
#4

(10-30-2018, 09:23 PM)Spalea Wrote: This beast, giant mustelid, would have been a nightmare for any opponent...

Something like grumpy hyena maybe :) But I doubt, that so suicidal, that it would have fought with bigger predators at the time too much. Big predators seldom see nightmares, but often rivals from whom usurp carcass or kill if not giving in voluntarily. It would be fun to know if this ancestor was with same attitude as current honey badger, but some things remain as mysteries...
Reply

Switzerland Spalea Online
Wildanimal Lover
****
#5

(10-30-2018, 10:26 PM)Shadow Wrote:
(10-30-2018, 09:23 PM)Spalea Wrote: This beast, giant mustelid, would have been a nightmare for any opponent...

Something like grumpy hyena maybe :) But I doubt, that so suicidal, that it would have fought with bigger predators at the time too much. Big predators seldom see nightmares, but often rivals from whom usurp carcass or kill if not giving in voluntarily. It would be fun to know if this ancestor was with same attitude as current honey badger, but some things remain as mysteries...

Yes, you're right. I told that by transposing the actual wolverine's behaviour to this giant ancestor, perhaps a little bit too easy ! Of course we don't know, in first approximation knowing that the mustelid are very tough predators regardless of their size, I judged a little bit too quickly it could be the same for the pleistocene mustelids.

But which predator would like to fight against a mustelid having the actual jaguar's size ? The opposition would be anyway very hard, even if this giant mustelid was very careful.
Reply

Finland Shadow Online
Regular Member
***
#6
( This post was last modified: 10-31-2018, 02:00 AM by Shadow )

(10-31-2018, 01:47 AM)Spalea Wrote:
(10-30-2018, 10:26 PM)Shadow Wrote:
(10-30-2018, 09:23 PM)Spalea Wrote: This beast, giant mustelid, would have been a nightmare for any opponent...

Something like grumpy hyena maybe :) But I doubt, that so suicidal, that it would have fought with bigger predators at the time too much. Big predators seldom see nightmares, but often rivals from whom usurp carcass or kill if not giving in voluntarily. It would be fun to know if this ancestor was with same attitude as current honey badger, but some things remain as mysteries...

Yes, you're right. I told that by transposing the actual wolverine's behaviour to this giant ancestor, perhaps a little bit too easy ! Of course we don't know, in first approximation knowing that the mustelid are very tough predators regardless of their size, I judged a little bit too quickly it could be the same for the pleistocene mustelids.

But which predator would like to fight against a mustelid having the actual jaguar's size ? The opposition would be anyway very hard, even if this giant mustelid was very careful.

Yes, wolverines and honey badgers are pretty good in bluffing, but when they see, that bluff is called... well, in that way honey badger is maybe more suicidal sometimes. Wolverine at least understands when it is time to flee. But I think, that lion or some ancestor of lion has been the one taking carcasses from even jaguar sized mustelid. it has been still far too small to challenge big cats. Of course time to time even lion can let current honey badger to be, when not so hungry and aggressive little devil has been confusing :) There are some funny videos about that kind of confrontations, and then again quite brutal ones, when big cat has been in.... should I say not in the forgiving mood....
1 user Likes Shadow's post
Reply






Users browsing this thread:
1 Guest(s)

About Us
Go Social  

Welcome to WILDFACT forum, a website that focuses on sharing the joy that wildlife has on offer. We welcome all wildlife lovers to join us in sharing that joy. As a member you can share your research, knowledge and experience on animals with the community.
wildfact.com is intended to serve as an online resource for wildlife lovers of all skill levels from beginners to professionals and from all fields that belong to wildlife anyhow. Our focus area is wild animals from all over world. Content generated here will help showcase the work of wildlife experts and lovers to the world. We believe by the help of your informative article and content we will succeed to educate the world, how these beautiful animals are important to survival of all man kind.
Many thanks for visiting wildfact.com. We hope you will keep visiting wildfact regularly and will refer other members who have passion for wildlife.

Forum software by © MyBB