There is a world somewhere between reality and fiction. Although ignored by many, it is very real and so are those living in it. This forum is about the natural world. Here, wild animals will be heard and respected. The forum offers a glimpse into an unknown world as well as a room with a view on the present and the future. Anyone able to speak on behalf of those living in the emerald forest and the deep blue sea is invited to join.
--- Peter Broekhuijsen ---

  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Elephants

India brotherbear Offline
Grizzly Enthusiast
#1

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20...122856.htm 
 
Asian elephants could be the math kings of the jungle
Experimental evidence shows that Asian elephants possess numerical skills similar to those in humans
Date:
October 22, 2018
5 users Like brotherbear's post
Reply

Finland Shadow Offline
Moderator
*****
Moderators
#2
( This post was last modified: 01-14-2019, 07:21 AM by Shadow )

Biggest of the big deserves to have own thread, and not only because of size. Elephants are fascinating in so many ways.

I link here one documentary about African elephants in Addo Elephant National Park. While most footage is about elephants, this document gives information about environment and other animals in same area too.




4 users Like Shadow's post
Reply

Finland Shadow Offline
Moderator
*****
Moderators
#3
( This post was last modified: 10-22-2019, 12:03 AM by Shadow )

Duke, was said to be the biggest elephant in the world 10 years ago, who knows, but big for sure.





Masthulele, another big one, carcass found in August 2017 and probably died in fight with another elephant and not by poachers. Something good at least even though sad to lose these giants. But he lived something around 49-50 years old if estimations are correct.




5 users Like Shadow's post
Reply

Finland Shadow Offline
Moderator
*****
Moderators
#4

This site has actually quite good overall information package about elephants for anyone who don´t know too much about those and doesn´t want to read scientific studies which can be time to time quite "painful" to read.

https://animals.sandiegozoo.org/animals/elephant
1 user Likes Shadow's post
Reply

Finland Shadow Offline
Moderator
*****
Moderators
#5
( This post was last modified: 01-14-2019, 08:39 AM by Shadow )

Even though this is sad story to read, how someone shot so majestic elephant, this is one older incident, which has back up in many ways to prove, that some old hunting stories can be considered reliable.

http://relivearth.com/articles/wildlife/...-elephant/

In another article Fenykovi tells, that skin of this elephant alone weighed over 2 tons.
2 users Like Shadow's post
Reply

United States Pckts Online
Bigcat Enthusiast
******
#6

In a sensational turn of events, Wild Elephants have returned to Bandhavgarh in Madhya Pradesh since the past couple of months.

They have entered from Chattisgarh and this most likely means that their older habitat is not sufficient for them, and having returned to these parts after a gap of possibly more than 50-100 years (?), one cannot guess the impact on Bandhavgarh either.

Where do they go from here? #habitatdestruction #incredibleindia




"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
3 users Like Pckts's post
Reply

Finland Shadow Offline
Moderator
*****
Moderators
#7

Elephant training in Nepal, year 2011. Video from WWF Finland. In description is told, that here can be seem modern ways to train elephants. In past elephants were trained also by hurting animals and problems were for instance, that it was slowly and also it, that adult elephants could attack also trainers who had hurt them. Many experienced Nepalese elephant trainers had told, that they didn´t like "traditional" training methods with hurting elephants. Here elephant is trained by rewarding so, that training experience is nicer for animal and trainer. It has made training and learning also faster.




2 users Like Shadow's post
Reply

Finland Shadow Offline
Moderator
*****
Moderators
#8

Interesting documentary about elephants. And also parts about many other fascinating animals and interactions.




1 user Likes Shadow's post
Reply

India Sanju Offline
Senior member
*****
#9
( This post was last modified: 04-23-2019, 10:09 AM by Sanju )





https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kallana

Kallana (Malayalam language name of Kerala state) is the suspected species of dwarf elephants allegedly found in South India. Kaani tribals dwelling in the rainforests of the Western Ghats (Kerala, India) claim that there are two distinct varieties of elephants in the Peppara forest range, one the common Indian elephants (Elephas maximus indicus), and the other a dwarf variety which they call Kallana. The name Kallana comes from the words "Kallu", which means stones or boulders, and "aana", which means elephant.

The tribals gave the creatures this name because they see the smaller elephant more often in the higher altitudes where the terrain is rocky. Some tribals also call the delicate creatures Thumbiana (thumbi means dragonfly) for the speed with which the pachyderms run through trees and rocks when disturbed. According to the Kani tribals, like all elephants, they enjoy bathing in rivers and they too have dust baths. Unlike larger elephants, however, they seem able to negotiate steep, rocky inclines. The existence of a pygmy variety of elephant in India is yet to be scientifically ascertained. Kani tribals claim they grow to a maximum height of 5 feet (1.5 metres).

In all other respects, they look like Indian elephants. For the past many years the forest officials and inhabitants of the Agasthyakoodam region have always heard Kani tribals talking about Kallanas, but there were never any confirmed sightings. Recently Sali Palode, a Kerala-based wildlife photographer, and Mallan Kani, a member of Kerala’s Kani tribe, who were in search of this elusive elephant were able to photograph one such dwarf elephant, and even claim to have seen a herd.

On 17 March 2010, the same Mallan Kani guided the photographer Ajanta Benny to a Kallana and he took pictures. This was reported in the Malayalam daily Malayala Manorama with a picture. But one needs to be captured and tested to see whether it is a separate species. A new video footage by Sali Palode and Dr Kamaruddheen attained media attention as well as government officials in studying about this, to confirm whether this is a new species. Some of the criticisms from experts is that all the sightings have been of solitary animal. So this could be a sign of genetic aberration rather than a separate species. In 2013, a dwarf individual belonging to Elephas maximus was observed in Udawalawe National Park in southern Sri Lanka and scientifically documented.
When Need turns to Greed, our Extinction happens.
3 users Like Sanju's post
Reply

United States Pckts Online
Bigcat Enthusiast
******
#10

Jeswin Kingsly
One more from this evening! 

So amazing to see such huge creatures balancing on such an challenging terrain just to get those grasses on the rocks. 

Nilgiris | June '19

*This image is copyright of its original author



"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
5 users Like Pckts's post
Reply

India sanjay Offline
Wildanimal Enthusiast
*****
#11

Elephant family mourning the death of calf in a funeral procession




5 users Like sanjay's post
Reply

India Charan Singh Offline
Member
**
#12





Situation is grave and this is moving video.
I'm depressed after watching it.

May be it I pasted it on wrong thread but I'm not sure if a thread on African Elephants exist as this one seems to be on Asian Elies.
Save & conserve the planet & its inhabitants, it's probably our last chance!
3 users Like Charan Singh's post
Reply

Switzerland Spalea Offline
Wildanimal Lover
******
#13

About #6:

fateful interactions between men and animals... Tragic here for the elephants. The paths to the water sources are recorded in the dominant matriarch's memory. What does it happen after if these paths aren't more safe ?
1 user Likes Spalea's post
Reply

India Charan Singh Offline
Member
**
#14

(06-14-2019, 01:04 AM)Spalea Wrote: About #6:

fateful interactions between men and animals... Tragic here for the elephants. The paths to the water sources are recorded in the dominant matriarch's memory. What does it happen after if these paths aren't more safe ?

Conflicts bw humans and Ellies are inevitable if paths aren't safe but there are number of ways to counter the situation. Two examples:
1. Make safe corridor of about 100 or 130 meters wide to particular waterhole.
2. Make artificial waterhole in the reserve itself.

I don't blame only the farmers in what is happening but everyone has a stake in it.




These solutions are specific to this problem but on the large, world can't function as individual countries in all matters, we need to come forward as one and as a leading species on earth (in terms of domination and impact) we must restrict our population, minimize pollution and provide safe habitat for all other living beings. Root cause of 98% problems of the world is Human greed, and sadly humans selfishness/greed is on rise.

In other words we humans had it enough, now it is time to use and develop resources for underprivileged humans and other living being.
Save & conserve the planet & its inhabitants, it's probably our last chance!
3 users Like Charan Singh's post
Reply

Switzerland Spalea Offline
Wildanimal Lover
******
#15

@Charan Singh :

About #8: quite agree with you !

We need to distinguish local problems and global problems. As concerns interactions between wild animals and human settlements, some solutions can always be found. You expressed a few ones in this problem concerning the elephants migration.

As for the "global problems", I believe sadly there is no solution... How do you want men to restrict their population and minimize the pollution but... quite abolishing the worldwide capitalism ? How do you want to ask to developing countries to give up their development after the most developed countries have been selfishly living for several centuries ? Yes they are going to provoke a global thermonuclear war conflict and everything will be solved... The staying humanity will restart from zero in a quite polluted and deserted by any wild life - excepted perhaps a few kind of insects on the Earth and medusas inside the oceans, - planet. The Capitalism will be dead from is natural cause.

The search of the profit rate...
3 users Like Spalea's post
Reply






Users browsing this thread:
1 Guest(s)

About Us
Go Social     Subscribe  

Welcome to WILDFACT forum, a website that focuses on sharing the joy that wildlife has on offer. We welcome all wildlife lovers to join us in sharing that joy. As a member you can share your research, knowledge and experience on animals with the community.
wildfact.com is intended to serve as an online resource for wildlife lovers of all skill levels from beginners to professionals and from all fields that belong to wildlife anyhow. Our focus area is wild animals from all over world. Content generated here will help showcase the work of wildlife experts and lovers to the world. We believe by the help of your informative article and content we will succeed to educate the world, how these beautiful animals are important to survival of all man kind.
Many thanks for visiting wildfact.com. We hope you will keep visiting wildfact regularly and will refer other members who have passion for wildlife.

Forum software by © MyBB