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Elephants

India brotherbear Offline
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#1

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/20...122856.htm 
 
Asian elephants could be the math kings of the jungle
Experimental evidence shows that Asian elephants possess numerical skills similar to those in humans
Date:
October 22, 2018
 Grizzly  - Boss of the Woods.
        
  
             
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United States Pckts Online
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#2

In a sensational turn of events, Wild Elephants have returned to Bandhavgarh in Madhya Pradesh since the past couple of months.

They have entered from Chattisgarh and this most likely means that their older habitat is not sufficient for them, and having returned to these parts after a gap of possibly more than 50-100 years (?), one cannot guess the impact on Bandhavgarh either.

Where do they go from here? #habitatdestruction #incredibleindia




"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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India Sanju Offline
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#3
( This post was last modified: 04-23-2019, 10:09 AM by Sanju )





https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kallana

Kallana (Malayalam language name of Kerala state) is the suspected species of dwarf elephants allegedly found in South India. Kaani tribals dwelling in the rainforests of the Western Ghats (Kerala, India) claim that there are two distinct varieties of elephants in the Peppara forest range, one the common Indian elephants (Elephas maximus indicus), and the other a dwarf variety which they call Kallana. The name Kallana comes from the words "Kallu", which means stones or boulders, and "aana", which means elephant.

The tribals gave the creatures this name because they see the smaller elephant more often in the higher altitudes where the terrain is rocky. Some tribals also call the delicate creatures Thumbiana (thumbi means dragonfly) for the speed with which the pachyderms run through trees and rocks when disturbed. According to the Kani tribals, like all elephants, they enjoy bathing in rivers and they too have dust baths. Unlike larger elephants, however, they seem able to negotiate steep, rocky inclines. The existence of a pygmy variety of elephant in India is yet to be scientifically ascertained. Kani tribals claim they grow to a maximum height of 5 feet (1.5 metres).

In all other respects, they look like Indian elephants. For the past many years the forest officials and inhabitants of the Agasthyakoodam region have always heard Kani tribals talking about Kallanas, but there were never any confirmed sightings. Recently Sali Palode, a Kerala-based wildlife photographer, and Mallan Kani, a member of Kerala’s Kani tribe, who were in search of this elusive elephant were able to photograph one such dwarf elephant, and even claim to have seen a herd.

On 17 March 2010, the same Mallan Kani guided the photographer Ajanta Benny to a Kallana and he took pictures. This was reported in the Malayalam daily Malayala Manorama with a picture. But one needs to be captured and tested to see whether it is a separate species. A new video footage by Sali Palode and Dr Kamaruddheen attained media attention as well as government officials in studying about this, to confirm whether this is a new species. Some of the criticisms from experts is that all the sightings have been of solitary animal. So this could be a sign of genetic aberration rather than a separate species. In 2013, a dwarf individual belonging to Elephas maximus was observed in Udawalawe National Park in southern Sri Lanka and scientifically documented.
When Need turns to Greed, our Extinction happens.
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United States Pckts Online
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#4

Jeswin Kingsly
One more from this evening! 

So amazing to see such huge creatures balancing on such an challenging terrain just to get those grasses on the rocks. 

Nilgiris | June '19

*This image is copyright of its original author



"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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India sanjay Online
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#5

Elephant family mourning the death of calf in a funeral procession




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Uruguay Charan Singh Offline
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#6





Situation is grave and this is moving video.
I'm depressed after watching it.

May be it I pasted it on wrong thread but I'm not sure if a thread on African Elephants exist as this one seems to be on Asian Elies.
Save & conserve the planet & its inhabitants, it's probably our last chance!
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#7

About #6:

fateful interactions between men and animals... Tragic here for the elephants. The paths to the water sources are recorded in the dominant matriarch's memory. What does it happen after if these paths aren't more safe ?
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Uruguay Charan Singh Offline
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#8

(06-14-2019, 01:04 AM)Spalea Wrote: About #6:

fateful interactions between men and animals... Tragic here for the elephants. The paths to the water sources are recorded in the dominant matriarch's memory. What does it happen after if these paths aren't more safe ?

Conflicts bw humans and Ellies are inevitable if paths aren't safe but there are number of ways to counter the situation. Two examples:
1. Make safe corridor of about 100 or 130 meters wide to particular waterhole.
2. Make artificial waterhole in the reserve itself.

I don't blame only the farmers in what is happening but everyone has a stake in it.




These solutions are specific to this problem but on the large, world can't function as individual countries in all matters, we need to come forward as one and as a leading species on earth (in terms of domination and impact) we must restrict our population, minimize pollution and provide safe habitat for all other living beings. Root cause of 98% problems of the world is Human greed, and sadly humans selfishness/greed is on rise.

In other words we humans had it enough, now it is time to use and develop resources for underprivileged humans and other living being.
Save & conserve the planet & its inhabitants, it's probably our last chance!
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#9

@Charan Singh :

About #8: quite agree with you !

We need to distinguish local problems and global problems. As concerns interactions between wild animals and human settlements, some solutions can always be found. You expressed a few ones in this problem concerning the elephants migration.

As for the "global problems", I believe sadly there is no solution... How do you want men to restrict their population and minimize the pollution but... quite abolishing the worldwide capitalism ? How do you want to ask to developing countries to give up their development after the most developed countries have been selfishly living for several centuries ? Yes they are going to provoke a global thermonuclear war conflict and everything will be solved... The staying humanity will restart from zero in a quite polluted and deserted by any wild life - excepted perhaps a few kind of insects on the Earth and medusas inside the oceans, - planet. The Capitalism will be dead from is natural cause.

The search of the profit rate...
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United Kingdom Sully Offline
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#10

Zero elephants poached in a year in top Africa wildlife park
  • ByCARA ANNA, ASSOCIATED PRESS

JOHANNESBURG — Jun 15, 2019, 8:31 AM ET



*This image is copyright of its original author

The AssociaOne of Africa's largest wildlife preserves is marking a year without a single elephant found killed by poachers, which experts call an extraordinary development in an area larger than Switzerland where thousands of the animals have been slaughtered in recent years.
The apparent turnaround in Niassa reserve in a remote region of northern Mozambique comes after the introduction of a rapid intervention police force and more assertive patrolling and response by air, according to the New York-based Wildlife Conservation Society, which manages the reserve with Mozambique's government and several other partners.

Monitoring of the vast reserve with aerial surveys and foot patrols remains incomplete and relies on sampling, however. And despite the sign of progress, it could take many years for Niassa's elephant population to rebuild to its former levels even if poaching is kept under control.
Aggressive poaching over the years had cut the number of Niassa's elephants from about 12,000 to little over 3,600 in 2016, according to an aerial survey. Anti-poaching strategies from 2015 to 2017 reduced the number killed but the conservation group called the rate still far too high.
The new interventions, with Mozambican President Felipe Nyusi personally authorizing the rapid intervention force, have led partners to hope that Niassa's elephants "stand a genuine chance for recovery," the conservation group said.

"It is a remarkable achievement," James Bampton, country director with the Wildlife Conservation Society, told The Associated Press. He said he discovered the year free of poaching deaths while going through data.
The last time an elephant in the Niassa reserve was recorded killed by a poacher was May 17, 2018, he said.

Political will is a key reason for the success, Bampton said, with Mozambique's president keen to see poaching reduced.
Bampton acknowledged that the low number of remaining elephants is also a factor in the decline in poaching. A year ago, he estimated that fewer than 2,000 elephants remained in Niassa, though he now says preliminary analysis of data from a survey conducted in October and not yet published indicated that about 4,000 elephants are in the reserve.
Still, a year that appears to be free of elephant poaching in the sprawling reserve drew exclamations from some wildlife experts.
"It is a major and very important development that poaching has ceased. This represents a major success," George Wittemyer, who chairs the scientific board for the Kenya-based organization Save the Elephants, told the AP.
The new rapid intervention police force is an elite unit that is better-armed than the reserve's normal rangers and has "a bit of a reputation of being quite hard," Bampton said, adding that no "bad incidents" have been reported in Niassa.
Members of the force are empowered to arrest suspected poachers, put together a case within 72 hours and submit it to the local prosecutor, Bampton said. "Just being caught with a firearm is considered intent to illegal hunting," with a maximum prison sentence of 16 years.
Wildlife experts have seen gains elsewhere in Africa against elephant poaching. Tanzania's Selous Game Reserve, widely acknowledged as "Ground Zero" for poaching and linked to the Niassa reserve by a wildlife corridor, also has seen a recent decline in the killings.
African elephant poaching has declined to pre-2008 levels after reaching a peak in 2011, according to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species.
But experts say the rate of annual elephant losses still exceeds the birth rate, and the encroachment of human settlements is reducing the animals' range. Africa's elephant population has plummeted from an estimated several million around 1900 to at least 415,000, according to surveys in recent years.
Collaboration and "huge effort" among the Niassa reserve's partners has been crucial but data show that issues remain with other iconic species such as lions, said Rob Harris, country manager for Fauna & Flora International, which supports one of the operators in the reserve. "So the combination of national-level support and on-the-ground effort must be maintained to improve the situation for all wildlife."





https://abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireSt...k-63731703
"When the tiger stalks the jungle like the lowering clouds of a thunderstorm, the leopard moves as silently as mist drifting on a dawn wind." -Indian proverb
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Uruguay Charan Singh Offline
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#11

(06-14-2019, 04:15 PM)Spalea Wrote: @Charan Singh :

About #8: quite agree with you !

We need to distinguish local problems and global problems. As concerns interactions between wild animals and human settlements, some solutions can always be found. You expressed a few ones in this problem concerning the elephants migration.

As for the "global problems", I believe sadly there is no solution... How do you want men to restrict their population and minimize the pollution but... quite abolishing the worldwide capitalism ? How do you want to ask to developing countries to give up their development after the most developed countries have been selfishly living for several centuries ? Yes they are going to provoke a global thermonuclear war conflict and everything will be solved... The staying humanity will restart from zero in a quite polluted and deserted by any wild life - excepted perhaps a few kind of insects on the Earth and medusas inside the oceans, - planet. The Capitalism will be dead from is natural cause.

The search of the profit rate...

Probably we should have a separate thread for it but main thing is we need to take these issue and find possible solutions.
I believe finding the problem and accepting that we have a problem is the first step towards solution.

General consensus among all nations have to be formed and already developed nations need to come forward to help developing nations.
UN needs to become a governing body and take more responsibility with greater authority - everyone needs to back each other.
For me capitalist economy model is hindrance in these actions and in near future (30-50 years) power will shift to certain world leading orgs. insteads of countries if no measures are taken - I'm not in favour of socialism but a conscience driven economy model.
Save & conserve the planet & its inhabitants, it's probably our last chance!
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Uruguay Charan Singh Offline
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#12

(06-15-2019, 06:59 PM)Sully Wrote:
Zero elephants poached in a year in top Africa wildlife park
  • ByCARA ANNA, ASSOCIATED PRESS

JOHANNESBURG — Jun 15, 2019, 8:31 AM ET



*This image is copyright of its original author

The AssociaOne of Africa's largest wildlife preserves is marking a year without a single elephant found killed by poachers, which experts call an extraordinary development in an area larger than Switzerland where thousands of the animals have been slaughtered in recent years.
The apparent turnaround in Niassa reserve in a remote region of northern Mozambique comes after the introduction of a rapid intervention police force and more assertive patrolling and response by air, according to the New York-based Wildlife Conservation Society, which manages the reserve with Mozambique's government and several other partners.

Monitoring of the vast reserve with aerial surveys and foot patrols remains incomplete and relies on sampling, however. And despite the sign of progress, it could take many years for Niassa's elephant population to rebuild to its former levels even if poaching is kept under control.
Aggressive poaching over the years had cut the number of Niassa's elephants from about 12,000 to little over 3,600 in 2016, according to an aerial survey. Anti-poaching strategies from 2015 to 2017 reduced the number killed but the conservation group called the rate still far too high.
The new interventions, with Mozambican President Felipe Nyusi personally authorizing the rapid intervention force, have led partners to hope that Niassa's elephants "stand a genuine chance for recovery," the conservation group said.

"It is a remarkable achievement," James Bampton, country director with the Wildlife Conservation Society, told The Associated Press. He said he discovered the year free of poaching deaths while going through data.
The last time an elephant in the Niassa reserve was recorded killed by a poacher was May 17, 2018, he said.

Political will is a key reason for the success, Bampton said, with Mozambique's president keen to see poaching reduced.
Bampton acknowledged that the low number of remaining elephants is also a factor in the decline in poaching. A year ago, he estimated that fewer than 2,000 elephants remained in Niassa, though he now says preliminary analysis of data from a survey conducted in October and not yet published indicated that about 4,000 elephants are in the reserve.
Still, a year that appears to be free of elephant poaching in the sprawling reserve drew exclamations from some wildlife experts.
"It is a major and very important development that poaching has ceased. This represents a major success," George Wittemyer, who chairs the scientific board for the Kenya-based organization Save the Elephants, told the AP.
The new rapid intervention police force is an elite unit that is better-armed than the reserve's normal rangers and has "a bit of a reputation of being quite hard," Bampton said, adding that no "bad incidents" have been reported in Niassa.
Members of the force are empowered to arrest suspected poachers, put together a case within 72 hours and submit it to the local prosecutor, Bampton said. "Just being caught with a firearm is considered intent to illegal hunting," with a maximum prison sentence of 16 years.
Wildlife experts have seen gains elsewhere in Africa against elephant poaching. Tanzania's Selous Game Reserve, widely acknowledged as "Ground Zero" for poaching and linked to the Niassa reserve by a wildlife corridor, also has seen a recent decline in the killings.
African elephant poaching has declined to pre-2008 levels after reaching a peak in 2011, according to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species.
But experts say the rate of annual elephant losses still exceeds the birth rate, and the encroachment of human settlements is reducing the animals' range. Africa's elephant population has plummeted from an estimated several million around 1900 to at least 415,000, according to surveys in recent years.
Collaboration and "huge effort" among the Niassa reserve's partners has been crucial but data show that issues remain with other iconic species such as lions, said Rob Harris, country manager for Fauna & Flora International, which supports one of the operators in the reserve. "So the combination of national-level support and on-the-ground effort must be maintained to improve the situation for all wildlife."





https://abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireSt...k-63731703

Great news and nice photograph with the article!
Save & conserve the planet & its inhabitants, it's probably our last chance!
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United States Pckts Online
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#13

Our Blue Planet
This is what an elephant herd supposed to look like. Tsavo, Kenya in the 1950s.

*This image is copyright of its original author
"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#14

@Pckts :

About #13: I remind during the 60s, it was told there were more than 30.000 elephants inside the Tsavo park which was famous because of that.
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