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Sri Lanka Apollo Offline
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Three leopard cubs found


A team of forest guards from the District Forest Office, Rautahat, in the course of patrol has found three leopard cubs in Chandranigahapur on Thursday. 

The forest guards found the three cubs of leopard, which is an endangered species, in Chocha forest area under Chandranigahapur forest division. The cubs appear to have been born just a few days ago. Locals, who had gone to the forest to collect fodder, were taking home the strange-looking animals thinking they were kittens. 

After the cubs were recovered from the locals, the forest guards had handed them over to the DFO. 


*This image is copyright of its original author


A forest guard feeding milk to a young wildlife, which appears to be a leopard cub, at the District Forest Office in Rautahat on Friday. Three cubs were found in a forest near Chandranigahapur on Thursday. (Madan Thakur/Republica)

Jayaram Patel, one of the forest guards, said that the cubs have been kept safely at the residential quarters of forest guards. The cubs have yet to open their eyes. Patel said the cubs are being fed buffalo milk.

Despite Patel’s claim that the babies are leopard cubs, Chief Forest Officer Baburam Bhandari said he is not sure. Bhandari said, “The cubs are from the cat family but may not be leopard cubs. We contacted the park authorities but they said the cubs are too young for them to care for. So the forest guards are looking after the cubs,” he said.

In recent days, due to fires in Rautahat forests, poaching of wild animals has also increased. Locals have also been taking in young wildlife fleeing the forest fires.

http://www.myrepublica.com/portal/index....s_id=74401
 

 
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Chinese frontier guards have saved an injured snow leopard that was trapped in a coal mine


Upon finding the leopard stuck in a drainage tank, the guards sought help from their nearby animal husbandry department.

With joint efforts, rescuers pulled the leopard out of the water using a fishing net.

One the of the guards described how they found an animal struggling in the water and described the brigade's shock when they discovered it was a snow leopard.

According to experts, wild snow leopards rarely appear at human residential areas. It is thought the leopard may have wandered into the coal mine for food.





 
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( This post was last modified: 05-12-2014, 04:20 PM by Apollo )

(05-11-2014, 06:01 PM)'Apollo' Wrote: Three leopard cubs found


A team of forest guards from the District Forest Office, Rautahat, in the course of patrol has found three leopard cubs in Chandranigahapur on Thursday. 

The forest guards found the three cubs of leopard, which is an endangered species, in Chocha forest area under Chandranigahapur forest division. The cubs appear to have been born just a few days ago. Locals, who had gone to the forest to collect fodder, were taking home the strange-looking animals thinking they were kittens. 

After the cubs were recovered from the locals, the forest guards had handed them over to the DFO. 


*This image is copyright of its original author


A forest guard feeding milk to a young wildlife, which appears to be a leopard cub, at the District Forest Office in Rautahat on Friday. Three cubs were found in a forest near Chandranigahapur on Thursday. (Madan Thakur/Republica)

Jayaram Patel, one of the forest guards, said that the cubs have been kept safely at the residential quarters of forest guards. The cubs have yet to open their eyes. Patel said the cubs are being fed buffalo milk.

Despite Patel’s claim that the babies are leopard cubs, Chief Forest Officer Baburam Bhandari said he is not sure. Bhandari said, “The cubs are from the cat family but may not be leopard cubs. We contacted the park authorities but they said the cubs are too young for them to care for. So the forest guards are looking after the cubs,” he said.

In recent days, due to fires in Rautahat forests, poaching of wild animals has also increased. Locals have also been taking in young wildlife fleeing the forest fires.

http://www.myrepublica.com/portal/index....s_id=74401
 

 

 



Leopard cub dies at the refuge of forest officials


One of the three leopard cubs that were found stranded at Rautahat's forest area recently has died this morning.

Officials of the District Forest Office, Rautahat, had provided refuge to the leopards at their own quarters.

Three leopard cubs were found near the Chocha Range Post under the Chandranigahpur forest area. After spotting the newly born leopards, locals had handed them over to the forest officials.

According to District Forest Officer Baburam Bhandari, the cub died as it was deprived of essential nutrients after being detached with the mother leopard. 

"We had reported to the wild life reserve the same day we found these cubs," Bhandari said. "They should have come to rescue these cubs. But no one concerned has shown up yet."

According to him, the remaining two cubs are also in a critical condition. We are preparing to give them medication after consulting veterinary doctors in place.

http://www.thehimalayantimes.com/fullNew...sID=414527
 
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Shifting lions bad for tiger too, says petition in SC


A fresh petition filed in the Supreme Court suggests that the proposed translocation of Gir lions to Kuno-Palpur in Madhya Pradesh may harm tigers moving from Rajasthan to Madhya Pradesh. It also suggests that the arrival of the tiger in India may have been responsible for the decline in the population of Asiatic lions in the country. The petitioner, Priyvrat Gadhvi, who has been appointed member of the State Wildlife Board, has moved the Apex Court against the proposed translocation of Gir lions.

The petitioner has stated that the proposed translocation is not safe for either of the big cats as there is a strong possibility of lions coming into conflict with tigers. Scientific evidence of at least four tigers regularly using the natural corridor between Madhav National Park in MP and Ranthambore National Park in Rajasthan has been submitted to the Apex Court. (Kuno-Palpur is sandwiched between these two sanctuaries.)

In the petition moved through lawyer, Nachiket Dave, Gadhvi has cited from scientific papers, photographs and various foreign authors, to establish that tigers from Madhav National Park pass through Kuno-Palpur wildlife sanctuary while going to Ranthambore National Park.

He has further stated that the Supreme Court has not been made fully aware of the importance of Kuno-Palpur wildlife sanctuary as a natural corridor for tigers and the volume of actual tiger movement in it. The petitioner even undertook a study tour from Ranthambore to Kuno and followed the pattern of tiger movement. He has also submitted a scientific study, 'Genetic Evidence of Tiger Population Structure and Migration within an Isolated and Fragmented Landscape in Northwest India,' done by the Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Hyderabad.

The findings of the study reveal that the population and migration of Ranthamobore and Madhav National Park tigers have important implications for protection and management of this species in northwest India.

"We propose that substantial conservation efforts must focus on maintenance and improvement of connectivity between Ranthambore, Kuno-Palpur and Madhav National Parks. Since these forests are located in different states (Madhya Pradesh and Rajasthan) of India, collaborative efforts should be made to protect this trans-boundary landscape," the study says.

Did tigers drive out Asiatic lions?

Gadhvi has further stated in his petition said that the Apex Court has not been fully informed about the co-existence of tiger and lion. Due to the lack of overlapping territories, there isn't much evidence to throw light on the interaction between the two big cats. However, several noted naturalists have suggested that tigers may have contributed to the decline of Asiatic Lions in India, the petition states.

Apart from quoting Indian writers, Gadhvi has also cited several foreign authors. Kenneth Anderson, author of 'The Call of the Man-Eater', had noted in 1961 that the tiger had originally come down from the north -from Siberia and Manchuria. "The lion slowly began to lose ground before that more active animal," Anderson had stated.

Gadhvi's petition further states that, in 1965, Richard Perry in his book, 'The World of the Tiger', had stated: "If tigers arrived in India later than lions, as is possible, then there is every probability that they were the containing factor." Further, Jack Denton Scott in his book 'Speaking Wildly' states: "Often larger and stronger than the lion, the tiger is credited with driving it from India."

The petition has also annexed a painting of lion-tiger conflict painted in the 18th and 19th century.
 


http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/...847682.cms
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State Pushes for Human-free Tiger Habitat

With the National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA) mounting pressure on designated tiger habitats to keep their core areas free of human habitations, the two tiger reserves (TRs) of the State are busy planning relocation of villages from the critical zones.

While Similipal Tiger Reserve is awaiting approval of the Ministry of Environment and Forests (MoEF) for relocating two more villages, Satkosia Tiger Reserve is hopeful of working out the first relocation plan after the election code of conduct is withdrawn.

Of seven villages located in Satkosia’s core, the TR management authorities are keen to see inhabitants of Raigoda relocated at the earliest since the villagers themselves had agreed to shift voluntarily. In a Palli Sabha meeting held in October last year, the 71 families residing in the village gave their consent to move out of the core critical area.

At least three relocation sites have been identified by Satkosia Tiger Reserve authorities who are waiting for release of funds from the NTCA. There are two rehabilitation options available for the oustees but the Satkosia management wants cash compensation, livelihood and resettlement plans to ensure a smooth transition, Field Director Pandav Behera said.

Once the model code of conduct is withdrawn, the TR management will hold meeting with Angul Collector to give a final shape to the relocation plan so that oustees can get dwelling units as well as livelihood options as soon as they move out.

In fact, of the seven villages, six are located on the other side of river Mahanadi and their residents have, so far, been resisting the resettlement plans. In such circumstances, the relocation of Raigoda holds great importance. “We want to create a model relocation plan which will inspire inhabitants of other six villages,” Divisional Forest Officer of Satkosia Wildlife Sanctuary SMT Rehman said.

Apart from aiming to relocate the revenue villages, the Satkosia management is also looking for shifting three forest villages from the core so that the critical zone remains completely free from human interference. “The Management Effective Evaluation (MEE) team of NTCA, which visited Satkosia two days back, advised us to initiate the relocation measures at the earliest,” Behera said.

Meanwhile, Similipal is also busy with the relocation plan of Kabatghai and Jamuna villages where 61 families are residing. The relocation plan is pending approval of the Forest Advisory Committee of MoEF since the villagers will be shifted to a forest land.

Sources in Similipal Tiger Reserve (STR) pointed out that moving out the residents of Jamuna may not pose much difficulty after the inhabitants of Barahkamuda were relocated in December last year. “The Khadia community members of Barahkamuda have strong rapport with the inhabitants of Jamuna. Now that the former have moved out, the relocation of the latter will be easy,” sources added.

In 2010, the STR authorities had moved out residents of Jenabil. That was followed by relocation of Barahkamuda and Balnagar last year.

“The residents of Kabatghai are ready to move out and we are persuading the inhabitants of Jamuna. We are hopeful of an early relocation,” said Field Director of STR Anup Kumar Nayak. A third village, Bakua, is located on the periphery of the core zone.



http://www.newindianexpress.com/states/o...212181.ece
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Lion cub run over by train in Gujarat

A lion cub died was killed after being hit by a goods train in Gujarat's Amreli district on Sunday. 

The seven-month-old male cub was found lying besides the track between Bherai and Pipavav port. Some villagers spotted the body and called forest department officials. 

"We came to know about it at around 6.30am. Preliminary investigation shows that the cub died due to severe head injuries," P Purushothama, deputy conservator of forests, in charge of Amreli forest division, told. 

Due to heavy rains in the region, the cub's body could not be taken to Dhareshwar nursery near Rajula where the postmortem is usually conducted. 

Wildlife experts said that besides long-term measures like building smart green infrastructure train drivers need to be trained in lion behaviour. 

"Such accidents are completely avoidable. Railways should impose stringent standard operating procedures for trains like speed limits and special course for drivers who should be taught about the sudden movement of lions, their behaviour etc. As a long-term solution, the government needs to adopt smart green infrastructure like in many foreign countries where railways and roads don't overlap with the territories of animals," said Priyavrat Gadhvi, member, state wildlife board. Gadhvi said that there is an urgent need to notify these belts as protected areas. 

In January two lionesses, one of them pregnant with three cubs, were run over by goods train on Savarkundla-Rajula track near the port. In February a lion died in a similar way near Bhammar village. 

Sources in forest department said that the railway officials of Bhavnagar division have expressed their inability to reduce speed of the trains. "We did discuss the problem with them but they said that reducing trains' speed will result in the schedule of many trains going haywire," said a senior forest official. 

According to the census of 2010, there are 108 Asiatic lions in Amreli district.



http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/Home/...993685.cms
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Madhya Pradesh loses another tigress in turf war

A four-year-old tigress was killed in a turf war with another tigress in Madhya Pradesh's Bandhavgarh National Park on Monday. 

Tigress's carcass, with deep bruises, was found near Bamera dam situated within Panpatha Range, by people in Kaseru villagers. 

"It was a sub-adult tigress. Body had several injury marks, which indicates that it might have died in infighting. These fights are common during the mating season. It died on Sunday night," state's chief wildlife warden Narendra Kumar told. 

He, however, ruled out that it was a case of poaching. 

"All the body parts are intact, including the skin. Hence, it was not a case of poaching," he said. 

"It's a war over territorial supremacy. This reserve is overcrowded and may lead to more deaths of big cats in turf war," said wildlife expert adding overpopulation of big cats in the reserve has forced them to redefine their territories, resulting in fights, especially in Bandhavgarh national park which hosts around 70 tigers. 


Local conservationist Pusphendra Dwivedi claims the reserve officials are trying to hush up the matter. Possibility that this tigress might have fell victim to poaching attempt cannot be ruled out. "There should be a transparency in cases of a death of big cat within the reserve. Officials swiftly disposed of its carcass after autopsy. There could be something fishy," he said.



http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/home/...018002.cms
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Prey base monitoring begins at Mudumalai

Using the favourable conditions created by the absence of tourist traffic for the last one month in the Mudumalai Tiger Reserve (MTR) near here, its management has set in motion a prey base monitoring exercise.

The reserve has remained closed since April 10 due to dry conditions and consequent water scarcity.

Pointing out that the exercise commenced on Friday with a training session, Wildlife Ranger L. Sundararajan told here on Saturday that it will go on till May 13. Stating that apart from wildlife officials about 30 volunteers from the Forest College and Research Institute, Mettupalayam are participating, he said that inter alia it involves transact line survey, carnivore sign survey, elephant dung count, pellet count, vegetation survey, and human interference survey. Stating that it was in accordance with the National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA) guidelines, Mr. Sundararajan said that while tiger monitoring was done once a year, the prey base monitoring exercise takes place once before the South West Monsoon and once after.

The objective is to assess the health of the reserve vis a vis vegetation.

At the end of the exercise the data would be compiled and documented.


http://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/Coim...998026.ece
 
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Big cat’s trail on screen


*This image is copyright of its original author

Ajoba being collared by biologist Vidya Athreya (right). Photo: Special Arrangement



“To know about an animal, you sometimes have to become one,” the character of wildlife biologist Purva Rao states in the film Ajoba, which released in theaters on Friday. The film, that talks about human-leopard conflict: an issue which has trespassed from the rural to the urban areas, makes a pertinent point of the need to understand animal behaviour.

The film starts begins with a leopard being trapped inside a well in Maharashtra's Ahmednagar district. What follows is the leopard's 120-km journey back to its own habitat over 29 days, closely watched by Dr. Rao and her team, who have placed a chip in its body before releasing it into the wild. Directed by 28 year-old Sujay Dahake, the film is inspired by the work of Vidya Athreya, with Urmila Matondkar playing Dr. Rao in her debut Marathi performance. 

Ajoba: meaning grandfather was the name Dr. Athreya's team gave the aging leopard. Dr. Athreya said, “It was important to show that animals are not a nuisance, and the film has done that perfectly. Usually, the electronic media sensationalises the issue, and does not go beyond the ‘man vs wild’ conversation.

”The idea of the film came to Mr. Dahake when he heard of another leopard trapped in Junnar near Pune. It was then that he met Dr. Athreya, and her animated description of Ajoba's journey that got him excited. “I thought that the story had drama, and had to be told to the masses,” Dahake told.

“I had found a hero in Ajoba. Here, nature trying to tell you that it will not interfere with your life unless you do so first,” the director said about the protagonist.The journey and the process of following it was not easy for Dr. Athreya, as it is not for Dr. Rao on screen. “Forest officials are helpful, but they have political limitations. I had to work with that,” she stated. “The characters in the film are an amalgamation of people who have helped me and tracked Ajoba's journey,” she said.

Another conversation that the film manages to strike is that of the role of women in unconventional careers, such as that of Dr. Rao's. She is seen living in rural areas for days together, negotiating with male forest officials and riding pillion with her assistants, all without the tag of 'being a woman'. “I am a woman. But that has nothing to do with how I work. If you're focussed, people will respect you for what you are,” Dr. Athreya stated. 

For Mr. Dahake, that was a conscious decision to portray the character in this way. “She smokes a beedi, and drinks whiskey. She is not apologetic about the fact that she's not married. It is what she has chosen for herself,” he states.




http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/ot...002231.ece
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(05-14-2014, 02:41 AM)'Apollo' Wrote: Madhya Pradesh loses another tigress in turf war

A four-year-old tigress was killed in a turf war with another tigress in Madhya Pradesh's Bandhavgarh National Park on Monday. 

Tigress's carcass, with deep bruises, was found near Bamera dam situated within Panpatha Range, by people in Kaseru villagers. 

"It was a sub-adult tigress. Body had several injury marks, which indicates that it might have died in infighting. These fights are common during the mating season. It died on Sunday night," state's chief wildlife warden Narendra Kumar told. 

He, however, ruled out that it was a case of poaching. 

"All the body parts are intact, including the skin. Hence, it was not a case of poaching," he said. 

"It's a war over territorial supremacy. This reserve is overcrowded and may lead to more deaths of big cats in turf war," said wildlife expert adding overpopulation of big cats in the reserve has forced them to redefine their territories, resulting in fights, especially in Bandhavgarh national park which hosts around 70 tigers. 


Local conservationist Pusphendra Dwivedi claims the reserve officials are trying to hush up the matter. Possibility that this tigress might have fell victim to poaching attempt cannot be ruled out. "There should be a transparency in cases of a death of big cat within the reserve. Officials swiftly disposed of its carcass after autopsy. There could be something fishy," he said.



http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/home/...018002.cms

 

4 years old, it was certainly no easy kill. I wonder what the other tiger looks like, and who it was.
Quite impressive yet sad that these females also kill eachother quite often.

 
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(05-14-2014, 10:38 PM)'Pckts' Wrote:
(05-14-2014, 02:41 AM)'Apollo' Wrote: Madhya Pradesh loses another tigress in turf war

A four-year-old tigress was killed in a turf war with another tigress in Madhya Pradesh's Bandhavgarh National Park on Monday. 

Tigress's carcass, with deep bruises, was found near Bamera dam situated within Panpatha Range, by people in Kaseru villagers. 

"It was a sub-adult tigress. Body had several injury marks, which indicates that it might have died in infighting. These fights are common during the mating season. It died on Sunday night," state's chief wildlife warden Narendra Kumar told. 

He, however, ruled out that it was a case of poaching. 

"All the body parts are intact, including the skin. Hence, it was not a case of poaching," he said. 

"It's a war over territorial supremacy. This reserve is overcrowded and may lead to more deaths of big cats in turf war," said wildlife expert adding overpopulation of big cats in the reserve has forced them to redefine their territories, resulting in fights, especially in Bandhavgarh national park which hosts around 70 tigers. 


Local conservationist Pusphendra Dwivedi claims the reserve officials are trying to hush up the matter. Possibility that this tigress might have fell victim to poaching attempt cannot be ruled out. "There should be a transparency in cases of a death of big cat within the reserve. Officials swiftly disposed of its carcass after autopsy. There could be something fishy," he said.



http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/home/...018002.cms


 

4 years old, it was certainly no easy kill. I wonder what the other tiger looks like, and who it was.
Quite impressive yet sad that these females also kill eachother quite often.

 

 

If anyone have any info on the dead tigress's identity do share it.
@Roflcopters @Rage2277 @Kingtheropod

 
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Another Tigress found dead in Bandhavgarh Reserve

 A four-year-old tigress was found dead in its enclosure at Bandhavgarh Tiger Reserve in Umaria district of Madhya Pradesh, forest officials said today. 

The tigress had been fed on Friday evening but when officials visited the enclosure on Saturday, they found the wild cat dead. 

The carcass was sent for postmortem, they said. 

Earlier, a tigress was found dead in the Tala range of the reserve on May 11. The feline was apparently killed in a turf fight, forest sources had said. 

http://zeenews.india.com/news/eco-news/t...49737.html
 
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The shocking seizure of so many dead pangolin - proves the sheer scale of the illegal wildlife trade from the wild. Chinese Authorities Foil Attempt to Smuggle 956 Dead Pangolins

Chinese authorities have intercepted 956 smuggled pangolin carcasses — one of the largest ever illegal pangolin operations it has ever seen, reports China’s state broadcaster, Xinhua.

The carcasses were being smuggled by car through the southernmost Guangdong province, which houses the port city of Hong Kong, and were hidden in 189 cooler containers. The smuggled wildlife cargo weighed 4 tonnes altogether. The driver was arrested and can face up to 10 years in jail according to a recent reinterpretation of China’s criminal law regarding the consumption and trade of endangered species – a move that is hoped to signify a crackdown on the issue by national authorities.

Demand for pangolins is high in China, where the flesh is sought after as a delicacy and the scales are consumed for alleged medicinal purposes.

Read the full story on Annamiticus at http://annamiticus.com/2014/05/14/chines...pangolins/

Image: Nearly 1,000 dead pangolins were seized by Chinese authorities, via news.163.com

*This image is copyright of its original author

 
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Vijaya (Kankati) the famous one eyed tigress of the Tala zone has given birth to her second litter of three cubs and shown them in public for the first time. More joy to come in teh coming season. the kankati female with her new cubs

*This image is copyright of its original author

 
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*This image is copyright of its original author

Hey All,

We're just back from our latest Ranthambhore Sojourn. All our striped wonders (including Machli) are doing just fine and the recent rains have ensured there is ample water for them despite the scorching hot summer.

10 safaris yielded a couple of dozen Tiger sightings and resulted in our guests running out of memory cards halfway through the tour. As if Tiger with a kill on 5 drives wasn't enough we also managed to sight & photograph a new Male (who has seldom been photographed) twice !!!

We’d completed 3 safaris and had 7 Tiger sightings already. However, wishful thinking as it may be, we were yearning to make an image of a Tiger in lush green background despite the summer being harsh. A 6.00 a.m start and 5 minutes into our 4th safari, there was a beeline of vehicles watching Sultan resting behind the undergrowth beside the main road. Just as we whispered out to him “Come on boy, would you mind walking ahead a few steps and sit out in the open for a few minutes ?”, he not only emerged out onto the exact spot with a lush green background, he also obliged us with a head-turn, direct eye-contact and a decent DOF. Silent prayers do get answered in the wild at times........



Hey All,

Here is a video for all of you, please watch it in HD mode please.

Although he was too close and looked menacing, he remained as cool as a cucumber. Apparently, he seemed to be in pain from injuries sustained in a fight with a rival male. The King looks all set to be dethroned from Tala after a long reign but continues to enthrall one and all.

Bamera Male, Bandhavgarh Tiger Reserve, February 2014
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=271490519689401
 
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