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Sri Lanka Apollo Offline
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( This post was last modified: 05-26-2014, 08:48 PM by Apollo )

Tiger deaths up in Tamil Nadu, one more poached


*This image is copyright of its original author


Forest officials on Friday said they had arrested two men from Kookal village in Kodaikanal hills for poaching a tigress and attempting to sell its skin. The foresters said Kalyana Sundaram and Dhana Sundaram had poisoned the tigress in Kodaikanal on February 4. 

The poachers skinned the tigress but foresters seized the pelt when they tried to sell it in Coimbatore on May 1. The poachers evaded arrest during the May 1 seizure of the pelt by the foresters. 

Foresters in Kodaikanal arrested Kalyana Sundaram and Dhana Sundaram on Thursday on information from Coimbatore forest officials. The foresters said their accomplice, Karthick, is still at large. Foresters dug up the skeleton of the tigress in Kodaikanal on Friday.

The poaching of the tigress, which foresters said appeared to be a three-year-old in her prime, has taken the number of tiger deaths across the country to 25 since January this year. Seven of the tiger deaths or close to 30%, the most in any state, have been reported from Tamil Nadu. This is the first confirmed case of tiger poaching in the state this year. 

Three of the other deaths remain under investigation (in one case a villager is reported to have poisoned a tiger that had preyed on his cattle), one tiger died in what foresters believe was a territorial fight with another big cat, police shot dead a man-eater in the Nilgiris in January and foresters in February recovered the carcass of a tiger that was too decomposed to determine the cause of death.

Poaching of tigers is clearly on the rise in the state and in the country, data on wild tiger deaths from the National Tiger Conservation Authority.The country lost 63 wild tigers in 2013. Poachers killed as many as 48 of the animals. 

Tamil Nadu reported only tiger death, in the Nilgiris, on March 11, 2013, and old age and the authority cited old age as the cause of death in only two other instances.Forest officials have started a probe to uncover what they believe is a well-entrenched network of poachers in Tamil Nadu.

After digging up the skeleton of the tigress, foresters said the animal was around seven feet in length from head to tail. "Samples have been sent to our lab for investigation," Kodaikanal assistant conservator of forests M S Parthiban said.

The spot where the tigress was killed is close to both the Indira Gandhi Wildlife Sancturary in Tamil Nadu and Kerala's Eravikulam National Park in Idukki.The poachers told forest officials that they killed the tigress to protect their cows. 

"They claim that the tigress had killed a cow on February 2," Parthiban said. "They poisoned the half-eaten carcass expecting the tigress to return to eat the remaining part of the cow."

"The poachers followed the tiger for three hours after it ate the poisoned meat until it collapsed," he said. "But once the tiger died, they skinned it and attempted to sell the pelt."[/font]



http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/home/...534175.cms
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India sanjay Offline
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What a Sad News... Wish Mr. Modi Can do some thing for tigers also.
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Sri Lanka Apollo Offline
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Poachers kill tigress with GPS collar in Madhya Pradesh



Poachers killed yet another tigress - fourth in the last two years - with an electric trap at the buffer zone of Bandgavgarh National Park (BNP) in Umeria district of Madhya Pradesh late on Sunday night.Carcass of adult tigress - BT2- was found near Khitoli range by the patrolling squad at 8.30 am, said sources.

Its GPS radio collar, nail and tooth's were reported missing.This tigress was electrocuted by trap laid through a 11 KV line by poachers near barruah nullah, said sources.Carcass has been preserved in a deep freezer. Post-mortem would be conducted as per National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA) protocol.

Earlier three tigers were killed by poachers in the same area forcing the state government to remove P K Shukla from the post of state's chief wildlife warden.

Last tiger was poached in Jugia village near Vijayraghogarh forest range (compartment No 448- Amadi beat) in December 2012.The tiger got killed on the intervening night of December 25-26 after it stepped on a live 50 metre GI-wire from the 11KV service line pegged to a wooden pole. The spot is at 60 km away from the Bandhavgarh National Park.

The tiger, around 9 feet long, suffered a major shock and died on the spot after it got in contact with the live wire.Another tiger had fallen into a similar electric trap and got killed on December 7, 2012. It's skinned carcass was found in the forest area of Umaria, approximately 25 kilometres away from Bandhavgarh national park on December 11.

More tigers were electrocuted in the Khitauli range of the Katni District and Kathotia forest area close to the state capital.The principal chief conservator of forest (PCCF) and chief wildlife warden Narendra Kumar did not respond to calls.



http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/home/...617872.cms
 
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India sanjay Offline
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(05-27-2014, 05:16 AM)Apollo Wrote: Poachers kill tigress with GPS collar in Madhya Pradesh



Poachers killed yet another tigress - fourth in the last two years - with an electric trap at the buffer zone of Bandgavgarh National Park (BNP) in Umeria district of Madhya Pradesh late on Sunday night.Carcass of adult tigress - BT2- was found near Khitoli range by the patrolling squad at 8.30 am, said sources.

Its GPS radio collar, nail and tooth's were reported missing.This tigress was electrocuted by trap laid through a 11 KV line by poachers near barruah nullah, said sources.Carcass has been preserved in a deep freezer. Post-mortem would be conducted as per National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA) protocol.

Earlier three tigers were killed by poachers in the same area forcing the state government to remove P K Shukla from the post of state's chief wildlife warden.

Last tiger was poached in Jugia village near Vijayraghogarh forest range (compartment No 448- Amadi beat) in December 2012.The tiger got killed on the intervening night of December 25-26 after it stepped on a live 50 metre GI-wire from the 11KV service line pegged to a wooden pole. The spot is at 60 km away from the Bandhavgarh National Park.

The tiger, around 9 feet long, suffered a major shock and died on the spot after it got in contact with the live wire.Another tiger had fallen into a similar electric trap and got killed on December 7, 2012. It's skinned carcass was found in the forest area of Umaria, approximately 25 kilometres away from Bandhavgarh national park on December 11.

More tigers were electrocuted in the Khitauli range of the Katni District and Kathotia forest area close to the state capital.The principal chief conservator of forest (PCCF) and chief wildlife warden Narendra Kumar did not respond to calls.



http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/home/...617872.cms
 

I found this image realted to this news @Apollo


*This image is copyright of its original author


Poachers killed yet another tigress - in fourth the last two years - with an electric trap at the buffer zone of Bandgavgarh National Park (BNP) in Umeria district of Madhya Pradesh late on Sunday night.
Carcass of adult tigress - BT2 - was found near Khitoli range by the patrolling squad at 8.30 am, said sources. Its GPS radio collar, nail and tooth's were reported missing.
This tigress was electrocuted by ugly trap through a 11 KV line by poachers near barruah nullah.
The body has been preserved in a deep freezer. Post-mortem would be conducted as per National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA) protocol.
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India sanjay Offline
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(05-24-2014, 11:49 PM)Pckts Wrote: Any more info on the age and size of the tigers that were released?

@Pckts , I found this information about this project from another facebook page

Vital statistics are gathered before the release of three Amur tigers back to the wild last week.

*This image is copyright of its original author


In the balance - a rare Amur tiger cub is weighed before his release back into the wild in the Russian far east

*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author


And the link that explain more
http://tigertime.info/blog/157/99/Orphan...o-the-wild
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India Pradyumna Offline
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A national park will be established in Karachay-Cherkessia to restore the Persian leopard population there.
The program on the restoration of the Persian leopard population was initiated by Vladimir Putin in 2009 and has been successfully implemented since then. Karachay-Cherkessia used to be a habitat of Persian leopards and therefore bears a strategic significance for the project.
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India Pradyumna Offline
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 It's thought that fewer than 12 Caucasian leopards remain in Azerbaijan
The future of the Caucasian (or Persian) leopard took a step forward last week with the establishment of a conservation agreement between Panthera, the world’s leading wild cat conservation organisation, and the International Dialogue for Environmental Action (IDEA) of Azerbaijan.
Panthera joined international wild cat scientists, environmental NGOs, and stakeholders at IDEA’s Caucasus Cat Summit in Baku recently to help plan the long-term preservation of the Caucasian leopard and Azerbaijan’s other unique wildlife.
Through this agreement, Panthera and IDEA have committed to assess the state and range of Azerbaijan’s leopards and, most importantly, work to develop conservation plans for the critically endangered population and train Azerbaijan’s scientists in research and conservation methodologies focused on saving the Caucasian leopard.
"We are delighted to have entered into this strategic cooperation agreement with Panthera, the world's leading wild cat conservation organisation", said Leyla Aliyeva, IDEA's founder. "Panthera has the expertise we need to carry out our programme of preserving the Caucasian leopard and its eco-system, an especially iconic symbol of Azerbaijan's cultural and natural heritage."
IDEA aims to foster conservation action among the country’s citizens, with a particular focus on the youth and next generation of Azerbaijan’s conservationists.
"We welcome Azerbaijan's initiative in seeking to protect and expand its leopard population," said Dr Thomas Kaplan, Panthera's Chairman. "Having just launched the conservation world's first global programme for leopard conservation, Project Pardus, we look forward to working with IDEA to make our shared ambition of saving this iconic species become a reality."
Scientists estimate that a small but vital population of 12 or fewer Caucasian leopards remains in Azerbaijan. As the first, urgent step under this new international collaboration, 20 PantheraCams – remote-triggered cameras developed by Panthera – will be deployed to delineate where leopards still occur in Azerbaijan and estimate their remaining numbers.
Sitting at the crossroads of Western Asia and Eastern Europe, Azerbaijan is one of just a handful of countries that still supports a population of the Caucasian leopard and is therefore critical to the long-term survival of this wild cat. In conserving the Caucasian leopard, Azerbaijan is not only helping to preserve the species and the country’s diverse ecosystems, but is also conserving the ancient and historic cultural heritage of its country and people.
The leopard is heavily threatened by poachers who target this cat for its exotic skin and body parts, which are sold through the illegal wildlife market. Loss of habitat and fragmentation, particularly in the South Caucasus region, is another major threat along with conflict with local livestock herders and overhunting of the leopard’s prey by local villagers.
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Sri Lanka Apollo Offline
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(05-27-2014, 03:19 PM)'sanjay' Wrote:
(05-27-2014, 05:16 AM)'Apollo' Wrote: Poachers kill tigress with GPS collar in Madhya Pradesh



Poachers killed yet another tigress - fourth in the last two years - with an electric trap at the buffer zone of Bandgavgarh National Park (BNP) in Umeria district of Madhya Pradesh late on Sunday night.Carcass of adult tigress - BT2- was found near Khitoli range by the patrolling squad at 8.30 am, said sources.

Its GPS radio collar, nail and tooth's were reported missing.This tigress was electrocuted by trap laid through a 11 KV line by poachers near barruah nullah, said sources.Carcass has been preserved in a deep freezer. Post-mortem would be conducted as per National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA) protocol.

Earlier three tigers were killed by poachers in the same area forcing the state government to remove P K Shukla from the post of state's chief wildlife warden.

Last tiger was poached in Jugia village near Vijayraghogarh forest range (compartment No 448- Amadi beat) in December 2012.The tiger got killed on the intervening night of December 25-26 after it stepped on a live 50 metre GI-wire from the 11KV service line pegged to a wooden pole. The spot is at 60 km away from the Bandhavgarh National Park.

The tiger, around 9 feet long, suffered a major shock and died on the spot after it got in contact with the live wire.Another tiger had fallen into a similar electric trap and got killed on December 7, 2012. It's skinned carcass was found in the forest area of Umaria, approximately 25 kilometres away from Bandhavgarh national park on December 11.

More tigers were electrocuted in the Khitauli range of the Katni District and Kathotia forest area close to the state capital.The principal chief conservator of forest (PCCF) and chief wildlife warden Narendra Kumar did not respond to calls.



http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/home/...617872.cms
 

 

I found this image realted to this news @Apollo


*This image is copyright of its original author


Poachers killed yet another tigress - in fourth the last two years - with an electric trap at the buffer zone of Bandgavgarh National Park (BNP) in Umeria district of Madhya Pradesh late on Sunday night.
Carcass of adult tigress - BT2 - was found near Khitoli range by the patrolling squad at 8.30 am, said sources. Its GPS radio collar, nail and tooth's were reported missing.
This tigress was electrocuted by ugly trap through a 11 KV line by poachers near barruah nullah.
The body has been preserved in a deep freezer. Post-mortem would be conducted as per National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA) protocol.

 



Its really very sad to see a tiger die this way.
Thanks for the picture.
 
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Sri Lanka Apollo Offline
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@sanjay ,  @Pradyumna

Nice info Sanjay and Pradyumna.
TFS
I like to see you guys contributing more for this news section, intsead of me being the lonely poster.
Thanks once again.
 
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Sri Lanka Apollo Offline
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Empowering locals new mantra in Nagzira-Navegaon corridor

Empowering communities through conservation is the new mantra in Gondia district's Navegaon-Nagzira wildlife corridor that connects two globally important tiger landscapes - Tadoba and Kanha in Central India.

To reduce pressure on natural resources and its sustainable use, Wildlife Trust of India (WTI) along with its partners Ecosystem Alliance & Japan Tiger & Elephant Fund under the Central India Tiger Conservation Project have initiated various eco development activities in the corridor villages.

The initiative will also boost newly-formed Navegaon-Nagzira Tiger Reserve (NNTR). A WTI study of the 280 sq km corridor shows presence of tigers, gaurs, four-horned antelopes, leopards, wolfs and wild dogs among other species in corridor.

During the study, it was found that extraction of natural resources for fuel wood, fodder and other livelihoods from the corridor was immense and if timely intervention was not made, very soon the corridor connectivity would be lost.

"In a bid to address the problem, improved stoves were provided to six villages (Sondlagondi, Jhambulpani, Sahakepar, Khamtalao, Junzari Tola and Alebedar) in Goregaon, Sadak Arjuni and Deori tehsils. Over 300 stoves have been installed in these villages including at 12 schools and two anganwadis," said Anil Kumar Nair, field officer of WTI.

According to a World Health Organization (WHO) study, five lakh women and children die in India every year due to various diseases from traditional cook stoves. Nair said improved models of stoves were saving 50% fuel wood and being smokeless they also helped in improving health and hygiene in the kitchen area. The stoves were gaining popularity among the villagers. A family uses around 200-300kg fuel wood each month.

Prafulla Bhamburkar, manager of WTI, said that to maintain wild source of economically important species, training on capacity building and sustainable harvesting methods for collection of non-timber forest produce and its value addition was done with the help of Centre of Science for Villages (CSV), Wardha.

A Nagzira self-help group (SHG) in Sondlagondi has been formed to make mahua pickle and spread, coffee powder from tarotta seeds, soft drink from ambadi and vermi compost from forest. The villagers are also growing organic ginger and turmeric in their backyards and undertaking construction of improved stoves.

The villagers of Sondlagondi and Jhambulpani on the periphery of Nagzira have unanimously selected mahua and preparation of vermi compost as livelihood options. "Post value addition training to villagers by CSV, mahua pickle has received tremendous appreciation from people. They were surprised to know that mahua, which normally is used to prepare liquor, can be used for making pickle too," said Nair.

The SHG for the first time participated in 'Palash' fair organized by Gondia district rural development agency in February.

What Is Being Done?

* 280 sq km Nagzira-Navegaon corridor is crucial as it connects two globally vital tiger landscapes Tadoba and Kanha

* It has species like gaurs, four-horned antelope, tigers, leopards, wolf and wild dogs among others

* There is huge fuel wood pressure for which new improved cook stoves 'Laxmi' are being provided to villages, anganwadis

* Collection of non-timber forest produce by sustainable harvesting methods with the help of Centre of Science for Villages, Wardha

* SHG formed to make mahua pickle & spread, coffee powder from tarotta seeds, drink from ambadi and vermi compost



http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/home/...221319.cms
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Uttarakhand a soft target for wildlife criminals


Two Bawariyas were arrested for tiger poaching in Kotari range of Kotdwar, Lansdowne forest division on Saturday. The close network of NGOs and forest department informers managed to stop their plan of hunting tigers. However, a notorious poacher, Bheema managed to flee.




*This image is copyright of its original author



Members of the Bawariya community are professional tiger hunters and consider Uttarakhand to be an easy spot for poaching big cats. That’s the reason why they keep on returning to the hill state to try their luck with one of the Bengal Tigers. The forest department has managed to check Bawariyas on several occasions, but failed to stop tiger poaching completely.



BAWARIYA COMMUNITY AT A GLANCE  

Originally from Haryana, 
Punjab and Uttar Pradesh, the Bawariya community is behind nearly 60% wildlife crimes in Uttarakhand, activists said. Known to use traditional techniques of poaching, these people work in groups of family members and stay as migrants in the hill state.

Rajendra Agarwal, state head Wildlife Protection Society of India (WPSI) said, “Bawariyas are migrants in Uttarakhand. A handful of members of this community are involved in 60% of the wildlife crimes in the state. They keep a low profile and works actively.

”One of the striking features of this community is that it uses traditional techniques of poaching. This generally includes use of steel traps, which are easier to install in forest areas where big cat movement is reported.

According to experts, Bawariyas can be spotted selling plastic flowers, wood items, local watches and other such products in Terai and Haridwar belt. Community members make friends and stay in rented rooms. As soon as they get an opportunity, they hunt tigers. 




BHEEMA, A LEADING TIGER POACHER

Belinda Wright, executive director Wildlife Protection Society of India (WPSI), a Delhi-based NGO said Bheema was a leading tiger poacher in Uttarakhand. “His connection with the hill state is strong. And no doubt he will return to the state again and again for killing tigers,” she told HT.

It was in 2005 when Bheema, along with his brother Hazari and partner Shankar Mandal killed a tiger in Kotdwar, Uttarakhand and was smuggling it across Uttar Pradesh. Division forest officer Najibabad then arrested all three accused in Kaudia range of its region, adjoining Kotdwar. After getting bail from a lower court, Bheema did not appear in Bijnore high court and thus, the court issued non-bailable warrant against him. After that, he went missing for two years.

Sources said that he spent two years in Haridwar developing nexus and contact to kill more tigers. Eventually, in February 2012 he was arrested in Gurgaon.

Bheema’s arrest brought a ray of hope for Uttarakhand forest department as the officers were sure he would not get further bail.

After his arrest, Bheema admitted to killing two tigers in 2011 and 2012 in Lansdowne forest division. However, Bheema get bail in late 2013 and immediately after coming out of jail, he planned another tiger poaching operation in Kotdwar which was tracked down.

SK Dutta, additional principal chief conservator of forest shared, “Bheema has killed several tigers of Uttarakhand. He is well versed with geographic conditions of Kotdwar. He knows the belt completely and also knows patches where tigers are present. He is a professional and no doubt one of the leading tiger poachers of the state.

”Besides Bheema there are other Bawariya tiger poachers.  Totaram alias Birbal was another threat to tigers of the state who was sentenced three years rigorous imprisonment by Khatima court of Uddhamsinghnagar district in December 2009. Totaram was in close contact with notorious poacher Sansarchand who is now no more.

In May 2012, a tiger-poaching incident was reported in Corbett Tiger Reserve. A series of raids and investigations followed and in Haryana 8 Bawariyas were arrested in this connection. Ramesh Bagri of Pinjore, Ginia Bagri and Tarachand Bagri of Panchkula, Gopi Bawariya of Chandigarh and Priya Bawariya were main accused arrested then.

Bheema was also involved in the case, who was later arrested in Gurgaon.

Besides, noted poacher Om Prakash Bawariya, Dariya Singh and wife Bhagwati also belong to Bawariya community and are involved in several wildlife crimes of Uttarakhand as well as other parts of nation.




FAILURE OF FOREST DEPARTMENT

Despite reminders from the National Tiger Conservation Authority, Uttarakhand forest department has largely failed to keep Bawariya community at bay. Blame it on the poor management or lack of manpower, forest department on various occasions has left its tigers at the mercy of Bawariyas. The May 2012 tiger-poaching incident of CTR said it all. When tigers are not safe in tiger reserves, then how can they be protected in territorial forest divisions of the state?

Dinesh Pandey from Wildlife Trust of India said, “There’s great emphasis on tiger conservation across the state. But, Uttarakhand forest department is inactive and slow in taking steps in accordance with NTCA guidelines. When Bawariyas can reach the heart of Corbett and hunt tigers, then they can kill big cats from wherever they want. The forest department lacks vision to conserve tigers. If Bawariyas are returning again and again to the state, it points out how easy it is for them to do poaching here.

”Needless to mention, lack of manpower mars Anti-Poaching Cell and APCCF intelligence wing. Both forest officers claim they have shortage of manpower. Informers are kept, but territorial staff is not included in intelligence and poaching cell activities.

 

http://www.hindustantimes.com/india-news...20982.aspx
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India sanjay Offline
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Great in depth information about Poaching. TFS
If so many info is available about these groups why don't govt and police take action? These people should be arrested immediately.
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Sri Lanka Apollo Offline
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( This post was last modified: 05-28-2014, 11:04 PM by Apollo )

(05-28-2014, 10:21 PM)'sanjay' Wrote: Great in depth information about Poaching. TFS
If so many info is available about these groups why don't govt and police take action? These people should be arrested immediately.

 

Exactly
If the government wanted, they can have these groups arrested in no time.
But these poachers do have their own influence and we have so many loop holes in our law system.
One Example is some of the recently arrested poachers have produced fake birth certificates saying they are minors (less than 18 years old) and hence cannot be punished.
We need more strict laws and actions should be taken immediatly by the officials without any delay.
These poachers deserve no mercy.


 
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Lion found dead in Gujarat's Pipardi village


About four-year-old male lion was found dead in Pipardi village in Savarkundla taluka of Amreli district on Thursday afternoon.

Sources said that a lion was spotted on outskirts of the Pipardi village on Thursday morning with unusual roaring. On Wednesday, lion had killed domestic cattle.

However, on Thursday afternoon, lion was found dead on the banks of Shetrunji River. Forest officials rushed to the spot and they have taken lion's body to Vadal forest area.

The exact reason behind lion's death would be known after the postmortem report is arrived but preliminary probe suggests that lion may have died due to snake bite.

Earlier, at least seven lions died in rail and road accident in Amreli district in last two months.

Meanwhile, forest officials of Gir East division rescued a three-month male lion club from Jambal village in Savarkundla taluka after foresters found it injured in both the legs. The injured lion cub was taken to Jasdhar animal care centre. Forest officials say that lion cub may have injured in infighting.



http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/...169229.cms?
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Tibetan fossil points to new origins for big cats


Scientists working in Tibet have found the oldest ever big cat fossil to date, suggesting such animals evolved in Asia before spreading to other continents. The predators were always thought to have evolved in Africa.



*This image is copyright of its original author


On Wednesday, paleontologists reported that they had unearthed the ancient skull of a big cat in Tibet, dated as being between 4.1 and 5.95 million years old.

The age of the find, published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, compares with the previous record for a pantherine felid, of about 3.8 million years old, for a fossil found in Tanzania. The biological subfamily Pantherinae includes tigers, lions, leopards, snow leopards and jaguars.

The journal paper concluded that the weight of evidence suggests that Pantherinae have their origins in central or northern Asia as part of a larger group that dates back some 16 million years.

"This find suggests that big cats have a deeper evolutionary origin than previously suspected," said investigation leader Jack Tseng, of the University of Southern California.

The origins of big cats have been strongly contested among scientists, with a lack of fossil evidence to indicate where they come from.

Tseng, along with his wife and fellow paleontologist Juan Liu, and Gary Takeuchi from the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles, made their discovery in 2010, in a border region between Tibet and Pakistan.

The find was made in a remote area, wedged between bones that were thought to have been deposited by a river. Scientists used DNA data to build a family tree, revealing that the skull came from a species most closely related to the present-day snow leopard.

A split between Pantherinae and Felinae - the group that includes domestic cats, cougars and lynxes - is thought to have occurred some 6 million years ago.

It is believed that the animals would have lived by preying upon creatures such as the Tibetan blue sheep.

The university said that the newly discovered animal, Panthera blytheae, had been named after "the snow leopard-loving daughter" of a couple that supports the museum in Los Angeles.

 
http://www.dw.de/tibetan-fossil-points-t...a-17223138
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