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Big herbivores!

India sanjay Offline
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A female elephant killed a buffalo.
Elephant killed a buffalo
*This image is copyright of its original author


According to author
Elephant slammed the buffalo back on the ground and backed up. She then herded her family to the other side of the road and continued to trumpet at the mortally wounded buffalo. The buffalo got up and staggered away as blood gushed from its side. He moved about ten feet away from the attack and fell to the ground. He did not immediately die as he kept his head up for a minute or so before completely collapsing.

Elephant vs Buffalo
*This image is copyright of its original author

Read full story and see other awesome images of this incident
http://blog.rhinoafrica.com/2016/01/12/b...g-buffalo/
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India brotherbear Offline
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It's no myth that elephants have great memories. Do you suppose that perhaps this particular elephant has a bad memory concerning buffaloes, or perhaps even this particular buffalo? 
 Grizzly  - Boss of the Woods.
        
  
             
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Poland lightsOut Offline
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( This post was last modified: 01-18-2016, 05:49 AM by lightsOut )




cow vs car



bull vs yak



Viking Wilderness - Muskox High Speed Collision

"Fools laugh at others. Wisdom laughs at itself" -Osho.
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United States Pckts Offline
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( This post was last modified: 01-18-2016, 11:23 PM by Pckts )

A Tusker Running behind a Safari Jeep @ Yala National Park.

Taken in March - 2015 - Sri Lanka
His name is Gamunu. Because of the continuous feeding of Visitors since last two years Gemunu had shown signs of becoming aggressive in his approach towards vehicles in his search for food. Here he is not actually attacking the vehicle he is just searching for food. But its a potentially dangerous situation for both visitors and the elephant itself.

*This image is copyright of its original author


A couple of things
1) I thought Sri Lankan elephants didn't grow tusks?
2)These are allegedly the largest or one of the largest Asiatic Elephants alive today

After looking up a few images, they obviously have tusks in Yala at least...

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


They must of meant the females, which of course females don't grow tusks in the asiatic sub species as a whole.
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United States Polar Offline
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I don't know much about elephants, but don't African females grow small tusks and Asian females do not? Some mature Asian males do and almost every mature African male posess tusks.
"Be the reason someone smiles. Be the reason someone feels loved and believes in the goodness in people."

- Roy T. Bennett
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United States Pckts Offline
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(01-19-2016, 01:01 AM)Polar Wrote: I don't know much about elephants, but don't African females grow small tusks and Asian females do not? Some mature Asian males do and almost every mature African male posess tusks.

African male and females both grow tusks, asiatic males grow tusks and the female do not, except for the occasional specimen and usually they are barely visible when they have them.
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United States Pckts Offline
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Rhino Rhino : The popular "One Horn Rhino" is crossing road inside Kaziranga National Park, Assam. Kaziranga, a world heritage site, is home to the famed One-Horn Rhino.


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India parvez Online
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Water buffalo and elephant from kaziranga. Both of them are really huge..

Attached Files Image(s)
       
Wisdom of third eye
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India brotherbear Offline
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( This post was last modified: 01-26-2016, 10:55 PM by brotherbear )

The great Indian one-horned rhino has always been a favorite of mine. They appear to spend more time in and near water than their African relatives. I sometimes wonder how these magnificent animals might get along with hippos? Nice parvez. 
 Grizzly  - Boss of the Woods.
        
  
             
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India parvez Online
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( This post was last modified: 01-26-2016, 11:02 PM by parvez )

(01-26-2016, 10:53 PM)brotherbear Wrote: The great Indian one-horned rhino has always been a favorite of mine. They appear to spend more time in and near water than their African relatives. I sometimes wonder how these magnificent animals might get along with hippos? Nice parvez. 

Hey Brotherbear, nice to meet you here again. Would be nice to debate with you again.

Hippos have a strong body and they are dangerous and unpredictable. But rhinos are pound for pound strongest among known animals as per some sources. So, it may be tough to predict which may win the battle IMO.
Wisdom of third eye
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United States Pckts Offline
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( This post was last modified: 01-26-2016, 11:15 PM by Pckts )

(01-26-2016, 10:53 PM)brotherbear Wrote: The great Indian one-horned rhino has always been a favorite of mine. They appear to spend more time in and near water than their African relatives. I sometimes wonder how these magnificent animals might get along with hippos? Nice parvez. 

I assume it'd be similar to the White rhino, a "mutual acceptance" with the occasional clash.
But I have seen both in person (captivity only) and the One horned rhino is a huge, huge creature and is said to be a bit more aggressive than most other Rhinos, but a wild Hippo is in the same category so I'd say it'd be a stale mate.
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United States Pckts Offline
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*This image is copyright of its original author
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United States Pckts Offline
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( This post was last modified: 02-01-2016, 11:41 PM by Pckts )

This is a Herbivore page but that doesn't mean a carnivore can't have a "photo bomb"




This frame is quite special to me... There is a fight going on between a Tusker and Makhna (Tuskless Male Elephant). A Tiger is witnessing the show from a distance and our national bird is taking a stroll around.

Nagarhole National Park
Dec 2015



*This image is copyright of its original author
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United States Pckts Offline
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Male Wild Water Buffalo Taking a Morning Dip
Kaziranga Tiger Reserve
India

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author

Baby Indian Rhino on the Road-Path
Kaziranga Tiger Reserve
India

*This image is copyright of its original author

Mother & Baby Wild Water Buffalo
Kaziranga Tiger Reserve
India

*This image is copyright of its original author

Mother Wild Water Buffalo Nurturing Her Baby
Kaziranga Tiger Reserve
India

*This image is copyright of its original author

Wild Water Buffalo & a Few Cattle Egret at a Small Biel at Bagori Range
Kaziranga Tiger Reserve
India

*This image is copyright of its original author

Wild Water Buffalo
Kaziranga Tiger Reserve
India

*This image is copyright of its original author

Some More Buffalo Female at Kohora Range
Kaziranga Tiger Reserve
India

*This image is copyright of its original author

Indian Wild Water Buffalo at Kohora Range
Kaziranga Tiger Reserve
India

*This image is copyright of its original author
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United States Pckts Offline
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Yellowstone Visitor


This has been receiving a lot of attention on my page, so I figured I would share it here as well. Feel free to visit Healing Soul Photography to be a part of the hundreds of comments from all sides. Just click on the original image. It turned into a wonderful forum with many passionate folks weighing in. I became a vegetarian from one of the exchanges.

The Fallen
I drove down Old Yellowstone Trail yesterday afternoon. I saw large groups of pronghorn and big horn on the way. As I approached the bridge at Cinnabar I noticed two orange vests, they were hunters. To my left the Sheriff was attempting to get these three bulls to move so that the hunters could safely retrieve their kill.
This piece is about behavior, nothing else. As heartbreaking as it was to see this specimen taken, I couldn't help but to observe a beautiful yet sad behavior. Three bulls were protecting the fallen from the Sheriff's truck. Tails up, grunting, bucking, and spinning, desperate to protect their family. The Sheriff backed off and the bulls still stood guard over the body. The one on the left would nudge the hind quarter until the legs would move, then backed off to see if the legs would move on their own, but the fallen remained motionless. The bull on the right was nudging the fallen's head, licking its face, placing its nose gently against the lifeless bull. The middle bull seemed to just observe, mirroring the actions of the bull on the right. They went from panic at first to what seemed like acceptance in the end. Their movements went from unpredictable to slow and methodical, from nudging to softly touching their fallen friend. Now I am not a bison biologist, just a photographer. What I wrote here best describes my experience. I am convinced that these animals have souls, powerful souls. They are not any different than us. This was a sad moment, but getting to see this behavior was a privilege. I feel an even deeper connection with these majestic creatures.

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