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Bears and Big Cats Interactions during Prehistoric Times

United States Smilodon-Rex Offline
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#31

Just like the weather
Posted on February 18, 2015by twilightbeasts
North America was a very different place during the Pleistocene. There were no skyscrapers, no highways, no concrete structures at all. Instead the landscape was wild, with grasses and white spruce forests dominating. This rich environment was filled with incredible creatures, including, amongst many, many more; giant short-faced bears, the weird rhino-like Toxodon, huge bison, the speedy pronghorns, enormous Mastodons,saber-tooth catscheetahs, and even the American lion.
Enormous herbivores were hunted and eaten by incredible predators. This was a time when giants succumbed to giants. Enter this world, through the amazing art of Ted Rechlin, where you can experience a snap shot of life in North America 13,000 years ago. Life was unpredictable. Just like the weather.

 
*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author

All images copyright Ted Rechlin (@TedRechlin)

Top text Jan Freedman (@JanFreedman)

Further Reading:

A great post on the Giant short-faced bear here.
A lovely post on the American Lion here.
https://twilightbeasts.org/2015/02/18/just-like-the-weather/
The website link is here
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#32

@Smilodon-Rex :

About [b]#31:[/b] this comic strip seems to be very interesting. Thank you for having make knowing it !


But, seriously, if the American lion lived in prides as the extant lions do, I believe the short-faced bear might learn to share the killed preys. The comic strip opposes a male and a female American lion against a short-faced bear, ok, no problem for the ursid. But against a pride of 4-5-6 famished lions having just killed a big prey, I doubt the big bear prevailed.

Sketched with a ballpoint pen:





*This image is copyright of its original author
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Venezuela epaiva Online
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#33
( This post was last modified: 12-18-2018, 07:19 AM by epaiva )

Amur Brown Bear captured by a camera trap during Tiger surveys in the Sikhote-Alin reserve.
A Population Estimate of Amur Tigers using camera traps

*This image is copyright of its original author
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#34

@Smilodon-Rex :

About #31: About the short story of the comic strip you showed... The American buffalo's body was pierced by a javelin that is broken by the short-faced bear. So the killers of this buffalo aren't the American lion but the men. Was it a trick by these men in order to draw the most powerful predator of the surroundings and after to kill it ?

Early diabolical !
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#35

About #32: I tryed to imagine the next step...



*This image is copyright of its original author
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United States Smilodon-Rex Offline
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#36

(12-18-2018, 02:50 AM)Spalea Wrote: @Smilodon-Rex :

About [b]#31:[/b] this comic strip seems to be very interesting. Thank you for having make knowing it !


But, seriously, if the American lion lived in prides as the extant lions do, I believe the short-faced bear might learn to share the killed preys. The comic strip opposes a male and a female American lion against a short-faced bear, ok, no problem for the ursid. But against a pride of 4-5-6 famished lions having just killed a big prey, I doubt the big bear prevailed.

Sketched with a ballpoint pen:





*This image is copyright of its original author
 Lions are the tough and brave fighter when they meet other carnivore competitors, especially when they are the coalition,  in fact,  female American lions may came together for defending their prey, lions and bears were the top carnivores in ica age western America, sometimes short faced bear would won but sometimes American lions would won the conflict, although bear was larger lions would defended together as a pride of 3-4-5, American lions may leaded a small family life that male and female lived together but they may also joined the temporary pride during the autumn or winter season like modern wolves or golden eagle.
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#37

@"Smilodon-Rex" :

About #36: agree with you. If the short-faced bear, individually, was the strongest predator, and this by far, he had to share the super-predator title with the American lion living in pride. I don't think the American lion lived in big pride as the extant African lions do, but nevertheless, the prey were certainly less numerous than now on the Serengeti National park, less numerous but certainly bigger (the American buffalo of the Pleistocene, perhaps his favorite prey, weighing till 2 tons...), thus we can think that the American lions could often hunt in pack from 3 to 7-8 individuals. Against 2-3-4 lions the short-faced bear had to move his opponents away. From 5 (and more) lions, the outcome could be inverted, I think...

And what about the dire wolf ? If the dire wolf hunted in pack of 30-50 individuals (why not ?), they should have their say on that...
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United States Smilodon-Rex Offline
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#38

(12-20-2018, 01:43 AM)Spalea Wrote: @"Smilodon-Rex" :

About #36: agree with you. If the short-faced bear, individually, was the strongest predator, and this by far, he had to share the super-predator title with the American lion living in pride. I don't think the American lion lived in big pride as the extant African lions do, but nevertheless, the prey were certainly less numerous than now on the Serengeti National park, less numerous but certainly bigger (the American buffalo of the Pleistocene, perhaps his favorite prey, weighing till 2 tons...), thus we can think that the American lions could often hunt in pack from 3 to 7-8 individuals. Against 2-3-4 lions the short-faced bear had to move his opponents away. From 5 (and more) lions, the outcome could be inverted, I think...

And what about the dire wolf ? If the dire wolf hunted in pack of 30-50 individuals (why not ?), they should have their say on that...
  Dire wolf played an role of spotted hyena, but American lion may be more tough and more confident when conflict with dire wolves, because American lion was larger and stronger than modern African lion but dire wolf just the modern hyena size, so dire wolves major competitor was smilodon fatalis becasue they were at the same class in food-chain of Ice age North America.
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United States Smilodon-Rex Offline
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#39


*This image is copyright of its original author

North American Predators
Some of the extinct Pleistocene predators of North America.


Arctodus Simus, American Lion, Smilodon Fatalis, American Cheetah and Dire Wolf.
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India brotherbear Offline
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#40

Is there any strong evidence that Panthera atrox lived and hunted in a pride like true lions? Or might they have been loners like a tiger?
 Grizzly  - Boss of the Woods.
        
  
             
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#41

(12-27-2018, 06:50 PM)brotherbear Wrote: Is there any strong evidence that Panthera atrox lived and hunted in a pride like true lions? Or might they have been loners like a tiger?

Strong evidence perhaps not... Several hypothesis in this link:

http://www.prehistoric-wildlife.com/spec...atrox.html
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India brotherbear Offline
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#42

I personally believe that perhaps some of the animals found in the tar pits less often were simply smarter animals who sometimes recognized the danger. Just a theory of course.
 Grizzly  - Boss of the Woods.
        
  
             
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#43

(12-28-2018, 01:35 AM)brotherbear Wrote: I personally believe that perhaps some of the animals found in the tar pits less often were simply smarter animals who sometimes recognized the danger. Just a theory of course.

I would believe it to be true.
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United States Smilodon-Rex Offline
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#44

(12-27-2018, 06:50 PM)brotherbear Wrote: Is there any strong evidence that Panthera atrox lived and hunted in a pride like true lions? Or might they have been loners like a tiger?
 Panthera atrox may likely to live and hunt in a couple or single like tiger in usual but sometimes it may joined together as a temporary group like modern Asiatic lion or golden eagle, the most possible living model was a male which lived with several females shared the common territory. 

*This image is copyright of its original author

   According to the latest report that Panthera spalea may lived in a small family, like what the picture shows 

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


The cave walls ofChauvet and Lascaux contain brilliantly realistic images of this extinct animal, showing that it lived in prides, and that males were maneless. We know this because in a few images, the adult male scrotum is obvious, and the mane is absent.
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#45

@brotherbear @"GrizzlyClaws" @Polar : happy new year !

I welcome your future posts !
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