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Asian Wild Water-Buffalo (Bubalus arnee)

India Rishi Offline
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Water buffalo Manas National Park, Assam.
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Old saves. Don't remember sources or photographers.

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After 100 years, wild buffaloes may roam Madhya Pradesh again With relocation of lions and cheetahs to Madhya Pradesh still a distant dream, the forest department is shifting its focus to reintroducing endangered wild buffaloes. A feasibility study for captive breeding of this species has already been conducted in Mandla, where it was last seen around 100 years ago. The Wildlife Trust of India (WTI) plans to begin by shifting a pair from neighbouring Chhattisgarh, where there are just 14 wild buffaloes left. There might be a few more deep inside the Maoist headquarters of Abujmarh where forest officials have no access. According to WTI, the wild buffalo (Bubalus arnee) that was once found in abundance across northeast India extending to northern and central India, is now critically threatened. A WTI survey estimates that no more than 50 individuals, in three subpopulations, in Indravati National Park, Pamed and Udanti Wildlife Sanctuaries in Chhattisgarh are still in the wild. There is none in MP, either wild or captive. “The estimated population of the wild buffalo in the northeast is roughly 3,000-4,000 — almost 92% of the world population,” WTI says. Asked about historical distribution of wild buffaloes in MP, J S Chouhan told TOI that full herds once roamed all over the Gondwana region. On reintroduction, he said, “Yes, it could be reintroduced in eastern Kanha, perhaps even in Satpura. Founding stock can be partially from Chhattisgarh.” 8/11/2019 After 100 years, wild buffaloes may roam Madhya Pradesh again - Times of India https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city...630481.cms 2/2 Asked if there is any difference in central Indian and northeastern wild buffaloes, Chouhan said, “Not much, but for certain features such as the horn span and pattern, and hoof adaptation”. In Chhattisgarh, the WTI project team is trying to use satellite collars on three free-ranging wild buffaloes to ensure proper monitoring. On the other hand, Madhya Pradesh government is expecting legal intervention to get Asiatic lions from Gujarat. In February this year, chief minister Kamal Nath had written to Prime Minister Narendra Modi on translocation of lions from Gujarat to the state against the backdrop of deaths of several lions there. “Kuno was developed as a second home for lions,” the CM wrote, requesting PM to issue orders to the Union ministry of environment and forest and the Gujarat government for smooth translocation. Nothing changed. In July, MP forest minister Umang Singhar raised the issue in assembly during a debate on budgetary demands for the department. “When Gujarat can get Narmada waters, when they can get greenery (due to Narmada waters), why can’t MP get lions? It’s one country and it’s a union of states,” he said. Requesting BJP MLAs to take up the matter with the Narendra Modi government, Singhar reminded that many contempt petitions have been filed in the matter. The cheetah relocation project has also been pending for long. Recently, the Supreme Court heard National Tiger Conservation Authority’s proposal to experimentally introduce African cheetahs in Indian jungles. Of the proposed three sites, two are in MP. NTCA said it carried out extensive survey and research to locate ideal habitats for cheetah in India and zeroed in on three — Kuno and Nauradehi wildlife sanctuaries in MP and Shahgarh in Rajasthan. https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/bhopal/after-100-years-wild-buffaloes-may-roam-madhya-pradesh-again/articleshow/70630481.cms
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Wild buffalo (Bubalus arnee) 

image by Somchai Jantra,



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( This post was last modified: 08-19-2019, 09:10 PM by Pckts )



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India Rishi Offline
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( This post was last modified: 08-23-2019, 07:32 AM by Rishi )

After 100 years, wild buffaloes may roam Madhya Pradesh
Aug 11, 2019

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BHOPAL: With relocation of lions and cheetahs to Madhya Pradesh still a distant dream, the forest department is shifting its focus to reintroducing endangered wild buffaloes.A feasibility study for captive breeding of this species has already been conducted in Mandla, where it was last seen around 100 years ago.

The Wildlife Trust of India (WTI) plans to begin by shifting a pair from neighbouring Chhattisgarh, where there are just few wild buffaloes left. There might be a few more deep inside the Maoist headquarters like Abujmarh where forest officials have no access.
According to WTI, the wild buffalo (Bubalus arnee) that was once found in abundance across northeast India extending to northern and central India, is now critically threatened. A WTI survey estimates that no more than 50 individuals, in three sub-populations, in Indravati National Park, Pamed and Udanti Wildlife Sanctuaries in Chhattisgarh are still in the wild.

There is none in MP anymore, either wild or captive. “The estimated population of the wild buffalo in the northeast is roughly 3,000-4,000 — almost 92% of the world population,” WTI says. In MP, J S Chouhan told TOI that full herds once roamed all over the Gondwana region. On reintroduction, he said, “Yes, it could be reintroduced in eastern Kanha, perhaps even in Satpura. Founding stock can be partially from Chhattisgarh.”


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Asked if there is any difference in central Indian and northeastern wild buffaloes, Chouhan said, “Not much, but for certain features such as the horn span and pattern, and hoof adaptation”.

In Chhattisgarh, the WTI project team is trying to use satellite collars on three free-ranging wild buffaloes to ensure proper monitoring.
On the other hand, both Madhya Pradesh & Chhattisgarh governments are expecting to get Asian wild water buffaloes from Assam to bolster the stocks genetic quality.
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India Rishi Offline
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( This post was last modified: 10-11-2019, 09:51 AM by Rishi )

UP looking to reintroduce water-buffaloes to Dudhwa from Assam


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After successfully translocating rhinos from Assam to Dudhwa Tiger Reserve 35 years ago,, forest officials are now propose to repopulate the jungles with Asiatic buffaloes, also called wild water buffalo. A proposal to the effect has been sent to the state government but the project is yet to receive an approval.

Dudhwa forests used to have population of water buffaloes in the past but they became extinct with time because of reasons still not known. Its habitat supports breeding of this species, which is listed as endangered in the IUCN Red list of wildlife species.

This idea to reintroduce the wild buffalo in Dudhwa was the brainchild of then field director Ramesh Pandey. It was sent for approval in 2018. Now the proposal has been sent again, after a project to translocate 5 female wild buffaloes from Assam to Chhattisgarh was approved by the respective state government to boost its population.


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With plenty of swamy grassland, Dudhwa Tiger Reserve covers an area of 1,285 sq.km stretching across the Lakhimpur Kheri & Bahraich districts. Compriseing the Dudhwa National Park, Kishanpur Wildlife Sanctuary, Katarniaghat Wildlife Sanctuary it includes three large forest fragments amidst the matrix dominated by agriculture. It shares the north-eastern boundary with Nepal, which is defined to a large extent by the Mohana River.The area is a vast alluvial floodplain traversed by numerous rivers and streams flowing in south-easterly direction.

WWF-India Mudit Gupta said about the possibility of reintroduction of wild buffaloes in Dudhwa, “Habitat here is quite similar to Kaziranga in Assam. Many species like swamp deer & hog deer exist in both places. Earlier, rhinos were successfully reintroduced here. There is a great possibility that the habitat will support wild buffalo. However, detailed habitat assessment exercise is needed to be done once the project is approved. Because wild buffalo is a mega herbivore like elephants and rhinos, it will help in effective grassland management in a natural way. Grassland management helps in the existence of small herbivores and prevents incidents like forest fire.”

Sources:
https://nenow.in/north-east-news/dudhwa-...assam.html
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/artic...483793.cms
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India Rishi Offline
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( This post was last modified: 12-06-2019, 04:46 PM by Rishi )

Source: indianaturewatch.net

The Kaziranga Bruiser
©Vinay Subramanyam

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The Lakeside Warrior
A massive bull gives us a brief look...An old warrior of the lakes !!

©Anirban Sen
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Wild Water Buffalo (with 2 calves)

©Arpan Saha
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Male.
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Water-buffaloes & one-horned rhinos.
©???


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Virgin Islands, U.S. Rage2277 Offline
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Chengappa B B - Asiatic Water Buffalo,Kaziranga-Assam. March 2020.
Looks like a normal buffalo at your native??..No.....Believe me have seen the horns more than 5ft wide kept at few APC's in Kaziranga and are much bigger than the domestic ones.They are very aggressive and have records of attacking and killed humans in the past though can't be blamed for that. Annual floods,Habitat destruction, breeding with domesticated buffalo and threat of disease spread from domestic animals grazing in the edges of the park pose a greater threat to their shrinking population.
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Nepal Jimmy Offline
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( This post was last modified: 04-14-2020, 06:45 PM by Jimmy )

Some drone footage of Koshi Tappu wildlife Reserve in Eastern Nepal
Wild water Buffalo herd at c.3:15 & 4:15 onwards




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Can a Male Wild Water Buffalo intimidate a Female One-Horned rhino?? Especially since both of the species spend time wallowing which is their common ground. At 3:30 and 8:26 very interesting interaction.



There is no denying the itimidating factor when you see their monsterous horn and physical presence.  0:15



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( This post was last modified: 04-16-2020, 06:54 AM by Jimmy )

Koshi Tappu Reserve, Wild Water Buffalo together with Feral cattle






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Nepal Jimmy Offline
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( This post was last modified: 04-18-2020, 09:02 AM by Rishi )

Mysterious' Hard Ground Wild Water Buffalo bubalis arnee arnee from Panna Reserve in 1979

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Artist's rendition of Wild Buffaloes roaming in the ancient sal forest of Central India

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An interesting read about the origin of Wild Buffalo of Panna in this link
https://round.glass/sustain/columns/wild-water-buffalo-panna-raza-kazmi/
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