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Zoos, Circuses, Safaris... A Gallery of Captivity

United States tigerluver Offline
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#1

Captivity is an aspect of human society that cannot be ignored. We all have had some experience with the non-human at such facilities, whether it be zoos, safaris, circuses, and the like. Post any interesting photos or videos of your or others' experiences with captive animals here.
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United States tigerluver Offline
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#2
( This post was last modified: 10-16-2014, 08:15 AM by tigerluver )

An interesting bear I came across. A paradigm of gentle giant, Juuso.








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United States tigerluver Offline
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#3

Posted by Pckts:
While I'll never agree with the breeding of Captive animals for profit, the fact that so many exist today is quite sad. Hopefully more place's like Noah's Ark https://www.facebook.com/NoahsArkAnimalSanctuary continue to strive for the education of the cruelty that breeding these animals for profit does to them.
The excuse that a Hybrid Tiger or Circus bear helps educate people and decrease the chance of animal cruelty is wrong, IMO.

Noah's ark does a great job of showing us that even though these different species may never run into eachother in the wild, if they share common traumatic expierences, they need companionship to help cope with the abuse they have suffered. They make sure to Nueter their animals so no more irresponsible breeding takes place, but they make sure that the nutered animals still get to live a good quality life that they deserve.
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United States tigerluver Offline
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#4
( This post was last modified: 10-16-2014, 08:26 AM by tigerluver )

Posted by Pckts:
A couple of great Rescue stories from Noah's Ark

"I told you never to talk to me that way again in front of the guests!", stated Little Anne. Poor Doc...sometimes he just can't win. To think that this 560 lb tiger is bossed around by a 160 lb American black bear is laughable. Why he tolerates it, we'll never know. Brotherly love, paternal love...who knows. All we do know is that they do love each other, play together, sleep together....it's amazing. #tiger #bear #noahsark http://www.noahs-ark.org
Image
*This image is copyright of its original author

Noah's Ark Animal Sanctuary Little Anne is an American Black bear who was a wild caught orphan kept by a small church in North Georgia until Department of Natural Resources placed her in our care. We had no bears she could socialize with at the time and about a month later, Doc the Bengal tiger was surrendered from a private zoo that no longer wanted him because he was too old to legally be used to make money by allowing the public to pet him. Both would have been euthanized if we had not had taken them. Young animals, domestic or exotic, must have physical contact with other animals if they are to be mentally and emotionally healthy, happy adults. The two showed interest in one another so the decision was made to introduce them, and they interacted beautifully. We have and continue to carefully monitor their behaviors, both as separate species and together. They are very bonded to each other and as long as they are happy and healthy (as deemed by our full time veterinarian and keeper staff, who are certified animal behaviorists, trainers, and zoologists) they will continue to live together

Tiger Lilly and Lion Liberty
She's about to jump on me, isn't she? I'm going to sit here, looking like the awesome cat I am until she bites me, then I'm going to chase her 'round and 'round. Then I'll hold her down and pull her tail 'cause that's what awesome cats with #cattitude like me can do! Tiger Lily and Liberty are quite the pair when they're engaged in play. You never know what they'll get up to next. #caturday #lion #tiger #noahsark http://www.noahs-ark.org


*This image is copyright of its original author


Anna Lou and Angus are coming along beautifully! Anna Lou is a Syrian brown bear and Angus is an American black bear. They are in our private rehab area for now, but we have begun fundraising for their habitat. We need to build a specialized habitat just for them. Bears need a spacious area to roam as well as hammocks to play in and their trees need particular attention because they will still climb some while they are young. With your help, we can build them a habitat that they will enjoy throughout their natural lifespan to include a natural waterway and lots of room to roam.

Noah's Ark is a 501©(3) Non-Profit organization and your donations are tax deductible. We have 1,500 animals of 100 different species and it costs approximately $33,000 per month to feed and care for the animals. We are completely debt free and receive no federal or state money, which means we receive no money from any taxpayer funded programs. We rely solely on donations from the private sector. Each and every animal that calls Noah's Ark home deserves the very best that we can offer them as an exotic in captivity. Your help allows us to provide them a good life and we could not do this without you. You can help build their habitat by donating at the following link, or to paypal at noah@noahs-ark.org (please specify "Bear Habitat") or by mail to 712 LG Griffin Road, Locust Grove, GA 30248 (please specify "Bear Habitat") or Crowdrise at https://www.crowdrise.com/BabyBearHabitat #buildabearhabitat #noahsark #bear http://www.noahs-ark.org

*This image is copyright of its original author


and of course, the famous
BLT
The #BLT (which stands for bear, lion, tiger) were all born in early 2001 and came to Noah's Ark in the summer of 2001. Baloo the American Black Bear (Ursus americanus), Leo the African Lion (Panthera leo), and Shere Khan the Bengal Tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) were discovered in an Atlanta home's basement by police officers during a drug raid. At only a few months old, all three cubs were frightened, malnourished, and infected with internal and external parasites when the Georgia Department of Natural Resources brought them to Noah's Ark. Shere Khan the tiger was underweight and malnourished, but with the treatment of his parasites and a healthy diet, he began to regain his cub like energy and appetite, as well as increase in weight. He is the lowest on the BLT totem pole and the most mischievous, always pouncing Baloo and Leo. Shere Khan also seeks out affection the most and numerous times throughout the day he rubs heads and grooms his brothers, strengthening their bond. Bengal tigers are native to parts of India, Nepal, Bangladesh and Bhutan and because of habitat loss and poaching, they have a conservation status of endangered. Leo the lion had an open, infected wound on his nose from being cruelly confined to a small crate. With room to stretch his growing legs and proper diet and veterinary care, the wound on his nose healed although he still carries a scar from his abuse. He is very stoic and enjoys napping on the porch of his clubhouse. Although he seems lazy, Leo turns into a different cat during enrichment time and is always the first to grab a toy or explore a new scent. Lions are native to Sub-Saharan Africa and Asia and although their distribution area is massive, they have a conservation status of vulnerable because of the introduction of disease, habitat loss and hunting. Baloo the American Black Bear was in the worst condition of the three cubs rescued, with a severely ingrown harness digging into his flesh because it was never loosened as he grew in size. The harness was so ingrown that his flesh had begun to grow over and around it, and surgical intervention was required to remove the harness and clean his deep, infected wounds. During Baloo's surgery was the only time the three brothers have ever been separated from one another, and Shere Khan the tiger and Leo the lion became extremely agitated because of it, pacing and vocalizing for the lost member of their family to return. After his surgery, Baloo was returned to his brothers and the three have been together ever since, with hardly a quarrel between and will do anything for a sweet treat. American black bears are native to most of North America and vary greatly in both size (the largest recorded was over 800 lbs) and color (can be black, brown or blonde). They are skilled survivors and have a conservation status of "least concerned" despite the increasing number of human/bear conflicts. Baloo, Leo and Shere Khan eat, sleep, and play together and even seek out grooming and affection from one another, head rubbing and licking each other. Their terrifying early months in life bonded the three together and they are truly inseparable despite of their obvious differences.

*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author
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United States tigerluver Offline
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#5
( This post was last modified: 10-16-2014, 08:26 AM by tigerluver )

Posted by Pckts:
Noticed the Doc and Little Anne image didn't show, Ill try a couple more
Weighing Doc

*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author


@Pckts Somehow the original thread was deleted by me editting a post... I saved all this and reposted it here. I ask if you could please repost this so it is under your name, just copy and paste this text and I can re-add the pictures if needed, sorry about that.
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United States tigerluver Offline
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#6
( This post was last modified: 10-16-2014, 08:18 AM by tigerluver )





@chaos, as I said to Pckts, please repost this and I'll remove my placeholder posts, sorry about that.
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United States Pckts Online
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#7

Lion and Tiger pool time Play







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United States Siegfried Offline
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#8

I wonder if any of these videos of a youngsters playing are of the same pair just at different times.




 
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United States Siegfried Offline
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This one is just terrible.  I wouldn't really characterize this as a fight, but rather a skirmish over food.  There doesn't seem to be the same genuine affection between the species in this particular video as seen in the earlier posts.  Perhaps feeding time brings out the worst in them or maybe they were just thrown together as adults and have figured out that lions stay here and bears stay there.  The bears seem far more ok with the situation than the lions seem to be.  The lions look quite stressed.



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United States brotherbear Offline
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#10

This story is told ( but lost ) somewhere over at the old AVA. The lion cubs and bear cubs grew up together in this zoo, in Japan I believe ( could be wrong ). The bears are Hokkaido brown bears ( Ursus arctos yesoensis ). Although they are the same age, the lions are fully mature while the bears are hardly more than sub-adults. No serious fighting was ever reported among these well aquainted animals. But, I doubt that they were kept together as the bears began to fully mature. It is my understanding that the Hokkaido bears are very closely related to the Ussuri brown bears of Siberia.
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United States Pckts Online
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(10-17-2014, 03:38 PM)'Siegfried' Wrote: I wonder if any of these videos of a youngsters playing are of the same pair just at different times.




 

 


Different animals, you can follow the pair I posted on their youtube page.
 
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United States Pckts Online
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Tiger's a rescue w/what looks like a deformity in its leg possible.

Nice to rescue's find a home. Hopefully their nuetered and get to live their life out in peace. 
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United States Siegfried Offline
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Pckts, so you think there are no videos of the pair of cubs in post #6 on line as older animals?  Might that young pair and the slightly older pair in the video I posted in post #8 be the same pair?  I really can't expect you to know for sure.  Just curious as to how the relationships between different cat species raised together develop over time.
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Netherlands peter Offline
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#14
( This post was last modified: 10-19-2014, 04:18 PM by peter )

ZOOLOGISCHER GARTEN, BERLIN

Last week, I was in Berlin. This great city has two zoos, about 9 miles apart. We only had time for the 'Zoologischer Garten' in the city centre. This zoo has many animals seen nowhere else. The most remarkable were the barasingha (a large Indian swamp deer), Pere David's deer (a large deer that became extinct in the wild at the turn of the last century, but was able to survive as a a result of captive specimens in the Berlin Zoo and an estate in the UK), the fossa (Madagaskar tree predator), the Java leopard (I never saw one before) as well as many others.

The Himalayan black bear, an oldish male, was as wide as a decent truck. He was closely followed by the Indian sloth bear. The jaguars were sturdy, massive and heavy, but not large. This was not true for the lions.

I wasn't able to figure out where they came from, but the male was the most muscular I ever saw. Definitely very close to the large male in a Scandinavian zoo discussed recently, but, in my opinion, much more developed. I didn't see any fat anywhere and he has it all: a large skull, a great mane, a massive upper body, tall and, to wind it up, a long body. A classic male lion, but in the hors category. I will not forget about the hind legs. It seemed as if he had been selected to tow carts and developed even after that. The lioness was much smaller, but as robust. 

We were able to see him at close range (6 feet or a little more). As the crowd admiring his classic features had a few well over 220 pounds, I was able to get to a guesstimate. My bet for now would be 3.5-3.6 at the shoulder standing, 9.6-9.8 in total length or a trifle more and 540-570 pounds, maybe even a bit more. I don't think there was much room for big mistakes. The main thing to remember, apart from his hind legs, was, as always in lions, the body. Massive and muscular. Skull large, wide and heavy. Power.

The three tigers all belong to Panthera tigris corbetti. This subspecies isn't often seen in zoos. Compared to the lioness, the two tigresses were taller, longer, more developed in the legs and much more active. The lioness, however, could have had a few pounds on them in the end. My guesstimate would be 300-320 pounds for all and no fat anywhere. The male tiger was a very nice one. Tall, long, well-proportioned, very muscular legs, a small mane and a rounded, quite large, skull. Stripes black, narrow, long and numerous. Ground colour a trifle paler than in many Indian tigers. Between 360-400 pounds, I think. The main thing to remember, as in most tigers, was the legs and the athleticism oozing from the well-proportioned bodies. Speed and power. 

DEBATES

When my companions had a small, but heated, debate as to the possible outcome of a bout between the male lion and the male tiger, some of the Germans in the crowd overheard us and offered their opinion. It is true, they said, the lion is larger and heavier, but tigers are faster and more 'aggressive'. Advantage lion, but not a walk-over by any means, it was concluded. I was a bit surprised about the outcome of the debate, as we know it usually goes with weight in male tigers. There's no reason to assume it would be much different in engagements between male lions or males of both species, but apparently not everyone agreed.

Debates on lions and tigers compare to those on soccer. You just never know, but everyone is prepared to offer an opinion in spite of that. Could be interesting, if those involved only could have been able to refrain from teapot observations and insult. The point is things in the similar weight and age division are close to unpredictable. This is why most were not prepared to bet on the outcome of a fight.

It is a great pity animals forums keen on a long life have to refrain from offering the opportunity to debate. We could learn a lot from those who have a bit of experience or knowledge, but can't as a result of the inability or the unwillingness to debate. A debate, almost by definition, is about things that are undecided. This prospect, apparently, is too much to bear for most. The experience in the Zoologischer Garten, however, says it can be done if those involved are willing to accept a few rules.

Anyhow, we spend many hours in the zoo and the restaurant wasn't bad either. And all this in the very pleasant October sun for extras. How lucky can you get. Photographs to be posted later.
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United States Pckts Online
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(10-18-2014, 06:48 PM)'Siegfried' Wrote: Pckts, so you think there are no videos of the pair of cubs in post #6 on line as older animals?  Might that young pair and the slightly older pair in the video I posted in post #8 be the same pair?  I really can't expect you to know for sure.  Just curious as to how the relationships between different cat species raised together develop over time.

 
The video you uploaded is from 2010, the video I showed is from 2012, you can also see them as cubs as well.
They're different animals. 


 
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