There is a world somewhere between reality and fiction. Although ignored by many, it is very real and so are those living in it. This forum is about the natural world. Here, wild animals will be heard and respected. The forum offers a glimpse into an unknown world as well as a room with a view on the present and the future. Anyone able to speak on behalf of those living in the emerald forest and the deep blue sea is invited to join.
--- Peter Broekhuijsen ---

  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Wolf (Canis lupus)

Finland Shadow Online
Senior Member
****

(02-10-2019, 07:29 AM)Rishi Wrote: GPS Tracking Shows How Much Wolf Packs Avoid Each Other’s Range

This image of GPS tracking of multiple wolves in six different packs around Voyageurs National Park was created in the framework of the Voyageurs Wolf Project. It is an excellent illustration of how much wolf packs in general avoid each other’s range.

Image credit: Thomas Gable

*This image is copyright of its original author

In Voyageurs National Park a typical wolf pack territory is somewhere around 50-70 square miles but that can vary from year to year. So that’s about the size of the areas marked with the different colors. The white line marks the boundary of the national park.
As beautifully demonstrated by the image, wolf packs generally avoid being around each other unless they are fighting for food that may be in short supply. When that occurs, they may engage in battles with other packs in order to continue have their claim on a given location as well as the food found within it.
Wolves may need to shift their territory due to human activity as well. When people clear out part of their natural habitat they may have to find a new route to get to their food sources. This can also create conflicts among the various wolf packs due to overstepping their bounds.
Sources: Voyageurs Wolf ProjectWolfworlds

I checked a little bit, I found information about territories of wolves here from 2014-2017. It was quite different here, there was clear space between territories of packs. Interesting to see how different situation can be compared to that in this national park :) But then again what comes to wolves and bears, whole Finland is like a national park, because they are protected by law and it is forbidden to kill them without a permission from officials, and that permission is far from easy to get.
1 user Likes Shadow's post
Reply

United States smedz Offline
Regular Member
***

(02-10-2019, 07:58 AM)Shadow Wrote:
(02-10-2019, 07:29 AM)Rishi Wrote: GPS Tracking Shows How Much Wolf Packs Avoid Each Other’s Range

This image of GPS tracking of multiple wolves in six different packs around Voyageurs National Park was created in the framework of the Voyageurs Wolf Project. It is an excellent illustration of how much wolf packs in general avoid each other’s range.

Image credit: Thomas Gable

*This image is copyright of its original author

In Voyageurs National Park a typical wolf pack territory is somewhere around 50-70 square miles but that can vary from year to year. So that’s about the size of the areas marked with the different colors. The white line marks the boundary of the national park.
As beautifully demonstrated by the image, wolf packs generally avoid being around each other unless they are fighting for food that may be in short supply. When that occurs, they may engage in battles with other packs in order to continue have their claim on a given location as well as the food found within it.
Wolves may need to shift their territory due to human activity as well. When people clear out part of their natural habitat they may have to find a new route to get to their food sources. This can also create conflicts among the various wolf packs due to overstepping their bounds.
Sources: Voyageurs Wolf ProjectWolfworlds

I checked a little bit, I found information about territories of wolves here from 2014-2017. It was quite different here, there was clear space between territories of packs. Interesting to see how different situation can be compared to that in this national park :) But then again what comes to wolves and bears, whole Finland is like a national park, because they are protected by law and it is forbidden to kill them without a permission from officials, and that permission is far from easy to get.

Good, now that's what I call law enforcement!
Reply

Canada Wolverine Offline
Regular Member
***


*This image is copyright of its original author





*This image is copyright of its original author


According to the text: "first tree wolves are old or sick, they determine the speed of all pack, if they stay in the tail of the pack they couldn't keep the pace and could perish; after them 5 strong animals, in the centre - all other members of the pack; the last is Alpha male, before him 5 strongest wolves":



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author



*This image is copyright of its original author
1 user Likes Wolverine's post
Reply

India Sanju Online
Indian
****

Wolves mark their territory over Koppal’s landscape
   
*This image is copyright of its original author

Study by Wildlife Conservation Society and "Deccan" Conservation Foundation shows predator (WOLF) is present in 86% of dist.

*This image is copyright of its original author

Surviving in isolated rocky outcrops and in channels that criss-cross the landscape of black soil, wolves and striped hyenas are making their presence felt in Koppal district of Karnataka (South Indian State).

Wolves, for instance, were detected in 86% of the district’s landscape, while the rare striped hyena was found in 23% of the district, shows a two-year-long study by the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and Deccan Conservation Foundation (DCF), which concluded in December 2018.
Quote:Large carnivores have a considerable imprint in the district, with leopards and sloth bears found in 15% of the area, shows the study.

The findings can indeed push the neglected district into finding a place for itself in the Forest Department’s plans. Currently, Koppal district has neither a terrestrial protected area (sanctuaries or reserves) nor a forest/wildlife management plan.

“In some ways, the extent of wolf distribution is not surprising. Each wolf can have a territory of more than 200 sq km. While other species are confined to rocky areas, wolves are everywhere. Koppal is a good habitat for wolves,” says Iravatee Majgaonkar from the WCS, who helmed the study.

Getting absolute numbers is tricky, considering that wolves are elusive, and there are no differentiating marks to keep a count on their population.

In 2005, researchers from Mysuru University estimated there were just 555 wolves in Karnataka, with around 25 in Koppal.

However, Ms. Majgaonkar says their numbers may be considerably higher.
Quote:“In the past century, the wolf population has definitely plummeted due to hunting and their declaration as vermin during the colonial rule. In the past few decades though, in Koppal at least, numbers are steady,” she says.


To determine the distribution, WCS divided the district into 25-sq km grids, and visited alternative grids, while over 600 shepherds were interviewed to confirm sightings. The team also placed camera traps at three rocky outcrops, capturing wolves, hyenas, rusty spotted cat, jackals, foxes, and others there.

Herbivores are a concern
While the large carnivores are making a sort of comeback, with no protection from poaching or habitat loss their prey have virtually disappeared.

Chinkaras and Nilgai, which used to be found in the area, have disappeared. Wild pigs (boars) are found in just 53% of the area, but their numbers are a concern.

Similarly, blackbucks, which thrive in the black cotton plains, are found in just 19% of the area.

“The predator-prey ratio is a real concern. We didn’t know it would be so disproportionate.

There has to be a mechanism to revive the herbivore population — by protecting blackbucks or translocation of wild pigs. This would lower the livestock losses for shepherds too,” says Indrajit Ghorpade, founder of DCF.
--------------

Shepherds’ tolerance
In the land of shepherds, the wolves of Koppal are intertwined in cultural lore. The study on wolves in Koppal shows shepherds in the district as having a high tolerance to livestock losses due to wolves.

This tolerance may be linked to the traditional shepherd community, Kurubas, who believe that wolves keep their flock fit by preying on the weak and diseased Wow .
Quote:“Even if villagers lose a few sheep to a wolf pack, they just shrug it off. They truly believe the presence of wolves keeps their sheep vigilant and active. And so, much fitter,” says Vinay Shankar, project manager, Deccan Conservation Foundation (DCF).  Wow
The team from Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), which helmed the study, tracked groups of shepherds over six months, and interviewed 110 of them. Just 34 shepherds, or 31% of the shepherd population - reported losses in livestock.

Of the 115 sheep or goats reported dead in this period, just 15 were by wolves, the rest through diseases. However, in terms of compensation, just six cases of wolf-related sheep deaths were claimed in 10 years.

What helps maintain the cultural tolerance, unlike other areas where man-animal conflict is on the rise, is the vast numbers of livestock there.

The study notes that for one wolf pack in a territory of 200 sq km, even if they feed on livestock every three days, each shepherd may lose just on an average one sheep every three years.

“Koppal is blessed to have this sort of cultural belief. But in the long term, this could be a cause for concern. People’s aspirations are changing and they could become less and less accepting of livestock losses. There will be a threshold,” says Iravatee Majgaonkar from WCS.

She, however, believes that the system of compensation for losses, which is not followed by the nomadic communities, must not be encouraged in the area. “This may backfire on the wolves. After a point, people will associate the animal with money and there may be low tolerance towards losses. The cultural association with the wolf may be broken as people will start looking at the canid as a ‘species of the state’ rather than belonging to the landscape,” she says.

Conservation reserves as a solution

Quote:The study finds that for wolves and striped hyenas, these rocky outcrops were used during their breeding period and to protect their young. However, these sites have seen rampant poaching, quarrying, mono-cropping, and tree felling.


“What we need in the district are micro-habitats of community reserves. If poaching or mining is stopped here, the wolf population will come up,” says Indrajit Ghorpade, founder of DCF.

The DCF has proposed to the Forest Department to declare Mandalmari outcrop, covering 150 acres, as one such area. Similarly, Twallahalla - “steam of wolves” in Kannada as the dense bushes there provide shelter to wolves.


Quote:At least 15 wolves in two packs have been camera-trapped there. The scrub jungles of Bankapura, which is a habitat for leopards and sloth bears, are also on their wish list.


The protection of the rocky patches will be an important refuge for the creatures as there is a chance the plains will change once irrigation and other agricultural practices are introduced, says Iravatee Majgaonkar from WCS.

“What is important is for a programme that includes villagers in conservation. By just declaring reserves, there is a risk of alienating villagers from the land,” she said.

https://www.thehindu.com/news/national/k...WFAJ1CGGrU
When Need turns to Greed, our Extinction happens.
3 users Like Sanju's post
Reply

Finland Shadow Online
Senior Member
****

Nice video where wolves are protecting cubs by harassing a black bear until it leaves.




3 users Like Shadow's post
Reply

Finland Shadow Online
Senior Member
****

This was quite lucky wolf and rare incident.

https://news.postimees.ee/6528814/pictur...-for-a-dog
1 user Likes Shadow's post
Reply

Venezuela epaiva Offline
Moderator
*****
Moderators

(02-22-2019, 02:40 AM)Shadow Wrote: Nice video where wolves are protecting cubs by harassing a black bear until it leaves.





Very good video
1 user Likes epaiva's post
Reply

India Sanju Online
Indian
****




Natural World: A Wolf Called Storm

When a pack of wolves sense something wrong with a bull, they leave the healthier ones behind to chase it instead.
When Need turns to Greed, our Extinction happens.
5 users Like Sanju's post
Reply

United States smedz Offline
Regular Member
***

I watched that video, amazing how animals can sense things we somehow can't sense.
"Those who do what they must do are like fire, they fear nothing. Those who don't are like rabbits, for they have much to fear.
Reply

Finland Shadow Online
Senior Member
****
( This post was last modified: 03-11-2019, 05:33 PM by Shadow )

This morning here in Finland and Helsinki. More closely Tammisalo in Helsinki if someone wants to look at that area. Lone wolf, most probably young male wolf which has abandoned the pack and looking around to find a female for mating and to find then own territory to reproduce etc. Again newspaper article with video, so hopefully video is functional for all.

https://www.iltalehti.fi/kotimaa/a/0b163...efb20ae8f3
1 user Likes Shadow's post
Reply

Finland Shadow Online
Senior Member
****

Another wolf and bear interaction, landscapes looked so familiar in this wolf vs. bear series from Smithsonian channel, that I had to look closer. 

Here is part of description: 
"NEW YORK - February 27, 2019 - Smithsonian Channel's new special WOLF VS. BEAR brings two archenemies together in a fight for food and survival. Shot over the course of a full year across the far northern wild of Norway, Finland and Russia, this one-hour special follows the tracks of two of nature's most formidable predators and shows what makes both creatures optimal predatory machines, albeit with remarkably different strategies. Read more at http://www.thefutoncritic.com/news/2019/...Wtf8Mrr.99"




2 users Like Shadow's post
Reply






Users browsing this thread:
1 Guest(s)

About Us
Go Social  

Welcome to WILDFACT forum, a website that focuses on sharing the joy that wildlife has on offer. We welcome all wildlife lovers to join us in sharing that joy. As a member you can share your research, knowledge and experience on animals with the community.
wildfact.com is intended to serve as an online resource for wildlife lovers of all skill levels from beginners to professionals and from all fields that belong to wildlife anyhow. Our focus area is wild animals from all over world. Content generated here will help showcase the work of wildlife experts and lovers to the world. We believe by the help of your informative article and content we will succeed to educate the world, how these beautiful animals are important to survival of all man kind.
Many thanks for visiting wildfact.com. We hope you will keep visiting wildfact regularly and will refer other members who have passion for wildlife.

Forum software by © MyBB