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White, Black & Golden Tigers

United States Pckts Offline
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#76

I saw this a while ago but lost the link.
Thanks for posting.
Now lets heat it up a bit...
Why do these tigers adapt with these thick stripes?
What about this area brings it out?
Does anybody have any info on it? (Terrain, Temp, altitude, prey etc)
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United States Pckts Offline
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#77

Sanjay Shukla


Royal Bengal Tiger (Panthera tigris)

I was lucky enough to see a tiger also in Kaziranga. I was in the Agoratoli (Eastern ) Range and the sun has gone down the horizon. I just wanted to see some of the Anti Poaching Camps. The determined and committed frontline staff in these camps has fought hard with the poachers to make this a safe place for rhinoceros now. The forester driving the vehicle was narrating me many stories of ambush with the poachers. Suddenly we saw one tiger moving ahead of us on the road. The light was pretty bad and distance was much. This was the best image which I could get before the tiger suddnly disappeared in the bushes. This was clicked at 20,000 ISO and 500 mm (equivalent to 750 mm).


*This image is copyright of its original author


To my knowledge, this is the first "golden tabby" wild tiger photographed but I could be mistaken on that.
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United States tigerluver Offline
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#78

Simply put, wow. A golden tabby in the wild with such a small population. What are the chances?
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United States Pckts Offline
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#79
( This post was last modified: 01-12-2017, 05:01 AM by Pckts )

(01-11-2017, 11:08 PM)tigerluver Wrote: Simply put, wow. A golden tabby in the wild with such a small population. What are the chances?

Very rare, I have read that further north the lighter the coat, so I would think the best chances of seeing a golden tabby/white tiger would be in the Northern Parts of India.
But that may have nothing to do with the white gene, so who knows for sure.
"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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Sri Lanka Apollo Offline
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#80

WOW
This is the first golden tabby tiger Ive seen in the wild.
TFS
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India parvez Offline
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#81

Amazing @Pckts thanks for sharing.
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India parvez Offline
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#82

Three black tigers spotted in Simlipal?
BALASORE : Speculations regarding the number of Royal Bengal Tiger (RBT) in Similipal Tiger Reserve (STR), the second largest in the country, have been put to rest with forest officials claiming to have spotted at least 25 tigers, including three melanistic (black) tigers, in the recently concluded survey.

The forest officials indicated that the population may be more as the census was conducted only in 400 sq km of 1,200-sq km core area. Earlier, the STR authorities had drawn flak from various quarters for declining number of RBTs.

Using pug-mark method, the STR had counted 101 tigers in 2004 and 61 in 2009. The number was challenged by National Tiger Conservation Authority (NTCA) and Wildlife Institution of India (WII). The two organisations had estimated 23 (12-34) tigers by camera trapping method in 2010 which the forest officials had refused to buy.

Regional Chief Conservator of Forest (RCCF) Anup Nayak admitted that there was a dispute over the figure which was calculated in pug mark method that was objected by NTCA. “There is no dispute now as the census has been carried out through camera taping procedure as recommended. Altogether 126 cameras were fixed at 63 points and the population was counted as per the core within the core principle,” he said.

Sources said most of the big cats were spotted in Na’ana South and North, Meghasan, Manchabank, STR 60, STR 9, Chahala and Upper Barhakamuda ranges, which are completely restricted for the people. What has brought cheers for the forest officials is that the big cats were only counted in one third area of the tiger reserve. Efforts were on to count the tigers in other areas too where their scats were found.

The RCCF said signs and scats of the RBTs were also spotted in Kendumundi, Satkosia, Joranda, Mukabadi, Jodapal and Khadkei areas. The census was started in January 2012 and so far five sign surveys have been completed, while the last one will be held in December after which the final report would be published. “The prey base has also increased over the years in the tiger reserve which is altogether a different terrain. The prey population has increased to 28 per sq km from 7 per sq km. There are 500 water bodies and seven rivers passing through the forest. There is no shortage of food or water in the forest, which has become a good habitation for the big cats,” he said.

In 2009, the Comptroller and Auditor General of India (CAG), after reviewing the functioning of the STR, had cast doubt over the tiger census figures presented by the then State forest authorities alleging that the pug mark method was not considered a fool proof methodology by experts.

source   http://throughgoldeneyes.blogspot.in/201...igers.html
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United States Pckts Offline
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#83

As tiger numbers rise you should start seeing more uncommon characteristics. Like with the golden tabby tiger just spotted in Kaziranga, I'm hoping that a white tiger makes it's way back to India again.
"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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India parvez Offline
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#84

@Polar that is melanistic tiger. There are totally three in simlipal. I shared the link you can see. May be you are right but surely is not case in leopards. The stripes don't conglomerate in leopards.
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India parvez Offline
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#85

Black tigers in simlipal,



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India Rishi Offline
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#86

(01-18-2017, 10:50 PM)Pckts Wrote: As tiger numbers rise you should start seeing more uncommon characteristics. Like with the golden tabby tiger just spotted in Kaziranga, I'm hoping that a white tiger makes it's way back to India again.
Plz share if u have any pics or news..I couldn't find anything!!  Sad
"Everything not saved will be lost."

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United States Pckts Offline
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#87
( This post was last modified: 02-06-2017, 08:11 PM by Pckts )

(02-06-2017, 07:17 PM)Rishi Wrote:
(01-18-2017, 10:50 PM)Pckts Wrote: As tiger numbers rise you should start seeing more uncommon characteristics. Like with the golden tabby tiger just spotted in Kaziranga, I'm hoping that a white tiger makes it's way back to India again.
Plz share if u have any pics or news..I couldn't find anything!!  Sad

It's posted in the "kaziranga tiger" thread near the bottom.
http://wildfact.com/forum/topic-kaziranga-tigers?page=5
"Imagination was given to man to compensate him for what he is not, and a sense of humor was provided to console him for what he is."
-Oscar Wilde
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India Rishi Offline
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#88

(01-18-2017, 10:40 PM)Polar Wrote:
(12-31-2016, 09:16 PM)parvez Wrote: Eastern ghats tigers include those from states of Andhra Pradesh, some parts of Tamil Nadu and Orissa. 
Simlipal tigers,

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author

What the heck happened to the second tiger's stripes? 

Seems as if he is more black than orange.

It's a Melanistic tiger...Right now, Simlipal is the only place on Earth to have such genes.
"Everything not saved will be lost."

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India parvez Offline
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#89

Sorry for posting statement but I was unable to resist myself from sharing with everyone. 
The reason for black tigers may be to camaflogue during night times. It is well known that many herbivores cannot distinguish colours. To capitalize on this aspect too, they may prefer to be black. These tigers must have had low hunting success rate they must have been struggling to hunt in previous generations due to various reasons. This must have through various generations led to development of pigment responsible for black colour. With this their camaflogue during night increases with possibility of increased success rates. This is just an opinion.
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India parvez Offline
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#90
( This post was last modified: 04-26-2019, 09:23 PM by Rishi )

More good quality picture i found of the melanistic tiger,

*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author


*This image is copyright of its original author
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