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Norway Pantherinae Offline
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#46

Grate pictures and videos @Apollo that tiger from Nepal is really something! sad to se specimen of that dimention go to waste.... 
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Norway Pantherinae Offline
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#47

1930's illustrated picture of mammals from France 

*This image is copyright of its original author
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Guatemala GuateGojira Offline
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#48
( This post was last modified: 12-31-2014, 10:56 PM by GuateGojira )

@Pantherinae, can you put the same image but in a higher resolution?

I love these draws from old books, they are so professionally made and accurate, not like some modern books with ugly draws that in many times, don't even resemble accurately the form of the animals.
 
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Norway Pantherinae Offline
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#49

No sorry guate... Got this sent from a friend. This picture impresses me with The accurate hind quaters on The cat's!
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Switzerland Spalea Offline
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#50

The tiger drawing was put again in some more recent "Larousse dictionnary" ("dictionnaire Larousse" français). When I was child I also was fond of old books about nature and animals  just because of the drawings accuracy.
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Sri Lanka Apollo Offline
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#51

Old hunting records

Bengal civil servant George Yule bagged 500 tigers in 28 years, Maharaja of Surguja killed 1710, Duke of Windsor shot 17 tigers in one week in 1921, while two were shot later during the visit of Queen Elizabeth to Ranthambhor in 1961. The Cooch Behar Maharaja alone bagged 365 tigers, 311 leopards, 438 buffaloes and 207 rhinos.

The English stalked for rhinos in the terai region bordering on Assam or Nepal and Karakoram’s rare Ovis Poli. The scrapbook of a district collector in 1900 mentions the accuracy required to shoot a mugger in an crocodile hunt down the Ganges near Allahabad. "Skins were sent to leather tanneries at Cawnpore and returned as handbags and briefcases." Tiger, panther and crocodile skins were shipped ‘home’ by P&O steamers. Dead elephant’s feet held umbrellas while tusks were used for gongs.

http://www.tribuneindia.com/2003/2003040.../main3.htm




Prince of Wales, after his tiger hunt.

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Skinning a Tiger

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Photograph taken in Alwar state, Maharaj Jay Singh of Alwar can be seen standing with sola topee or hat behind the tiger.

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India sanjay Offline
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#52

An amazing photograph of chained Caracals in Jaipur during the early 1900's.

Maharajas tamed these beautiful wildcats along with the Cheetah and Leopard and used them on their hunting trips to help catch small game like deer, hares and birds.

An interesting piece of information with regard to this reads:

"To train them to attack and hunt, the keeper would put a piece of meat on the end of the bamboo cane and hold it up as high as he could, and one of the Caracals would make a prodigious spring from the ground to the top, taking the meat, before coming down again in an instant. Like Cheetahs, the Caracal too were taken out in carts blindfolded and were let out when within sight of hares and small deer, where they would creep up and spring upon them, holding them till the hunter comes and takes the animal. They are so intent on their work that they are easily blindfolded and led away again into the cart.

The Caracals were chained to rope cots (beds) or wooden poles in front of houses down the street with their keepers sitting or sleeping behind them as little children, peacocks and hens, wandered among them without the slightest fear."

Today the Caracal is nearing extinction in India. A wildcat i would love to see and photograph but not sure if i ever will.

*This image is copyright of its original author

 
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Sri Lanka Apollo Offline
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#53
( This post was last modified: 01-12-2015, 10:37 AM by Apollo )

Amur Tiger New York 1901

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The Illustration titled “The Clouded Tiger and The Horned Hen” from a German illustrator named Robert Kretschmer in 1871. We have to remember that Clouded Leopard was declared into a new species in 2007, and they are identified as clouded tiger in the past.

*This image is copyright of its original author








Clouded Tiger in Sumatra in 1854

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Circus 1913

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*This image is copyright of its original author


 
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Sri Lanka Apollo Offline
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#54

Sumatra, 1952. From T. Schilling, Tijgermensen van Anai with trophy Sumatran rhino and native guides.

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Sambar deer hunt in North India (Terai)

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The Dwarf Blue Sheep was discovered by Schaefer. The species got the scientific name pseudois shaeferi in his honor. It is perhaps the rarest of all sheep, the entire population estimated at 200 animals. This pic shows they were hunted in Himalayas.

*This image is copyright of its original author









Common blue sheep hunted in Nepal

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Sri Lanka Apollo Offline
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#55

A picture of dead Sumatran tiger, Man Eating Tiger Sibolga.

*This image is copyright of its original author









Bengal tiger cubs 1930

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This is Rampok Matjan in Java, a local tradition to put a tiger in a large square that is occupied with more than thousand men armed with long spears.

*This image is copyright of its original author









Mrs Fohwein (holding the tails of a dead Sumatran Tiger), wife of Arel Fohwein (The Ruler of the area) and her daughter Martha with a shot Tiger and Boar in Jambi, Sumatra in 1930.

*This image is copyright of its original author




 
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United States Pckts Offline
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#56

(01-23-2015, 03:14 AM)'Apollo' Wrote: A picture of dead Sumatran tiger, Man Eating Tiger Sibolga.









Bengal tiger cubs 1930









This is Rampok Matjan in Java, a local tradition to put a tiger in a large square that is occupied with more than thousand men armed with long spears.

*This image is copyright of its original author









Mrs Fohwein (holding the tails of a dead Sumatran Tiger), wife of Arel Fohwein (The Ruler of the area) and her daughter Martha with a shot Tiger and Boar in Jambi, Sumatra in 1930.




 

 

I'm not sure I want to know the answer but....
What happens next?

 
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Sri Lanka Apollo Offline
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#57

The tiger fight or Rampok Matjan was a popular spectacle with a ritual character . Tigers or leopards are killed in public . It is a time - Honoured tradition, the struggle between man and beast , with the tiger representing evil . Initially the Rampok Matjan formed part of the ceremonies of the Middle Javanese courts at the end of Ramadan . In those times the fight was more sensational , as it took place between the tigers and bulls . Then too the intention of the fight was that the tiger would lose . For many Spectators the tiger symbolized the colonial regime , whereas the bull represented the Indonesian people .

 
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United States Pckts Offline
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#58

I would love/hate to see images of the fights taking place?
I wonder where we could find them? It would be a good idea to get a sizes of Java Tigers compared to the bulls and even just see the tigers themselves. There has got to be a place or library that has them.
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Sri Lanka Apollo Offline
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#59

Rare Footage Tiger Hunting with Recurve Bow! From The Fred Bear Archive!







 
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Sri Lanka Apollo Offline
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#60

A photograph of Lt. Hofman who claimed to have shot 110 tigers. This photo was taken at Bronbeek in 12 January 1979.

*This image is copyright of its original author









Audrey Hepburn baptizing tigers in Geneva accompanied by animal trainer Louis Knee in  1974

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Tiger in a Circus, doing acrobat on elephant’s back in 1965

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A kid playing with three tiger cubs in a zoo in Netherland for the first time outside with animal keeper H. Nijdam in 1964.

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